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    1. Kit: , by (Yearly Subscriber) Roger Zimmermann is offline
      Builder Last Online: Oct 2019 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/12 Rating:  Thanks: 1
      Started: 06-10-19 Build Revisions: Never  
      Supported Scratch Built Completed

      Since a boy, I was always fascinated by cars. There were some cars in the small village at the countryside where I grow up, especially VWs (I will never understand why this ugly thing, noisy, unpractical was sold in such quantities). I believe that one of both grocers from the village had a early fifties green 2-door Chevrolet; this was probably the king of the village!

      Ironically, my parents had no car et never had one. If by chance a Studebaker was parked at one of both cafés from that 300 inhabitant's village, I could stay hour(s) to look at it. The 1950 model was the one which started it all.

      We are going forwards for some years: in 1963, the Studebaker Avanti was shown at the Geneva Show; I'm sure that I was a nuisance for the stand's personal as I could not away from this stand!

      I will not relate here all my attempts to recreate cars during my youth using cardboard and a frame done with the Meccano kit. The last vehicle done with this hybrid material was a 1963 Chrysler. I did for this model an innovation: by wetting the cardboard, it could be better shaped in both directions at once.



      After the Geneva show adventure, I had to replicate this Avanti. At that time, I was 18 years old; my father, a wood worker, had not the right tools for my needs. Anyway, I began to do a frame using as a guide the image from the sales catalog I reluctantly got in Geneva. My father had some galvanized sheetmetal; I used that for that frame.
      Why did I choose the scale 1:12? Probably because the available skinny Meccano wheels were suitable for that scale. The construction went muck quicker than what I did in the recent years; there were less details and the resemblance was...marginal at best!



      I was proud from my front suspension and steering system miles away from the reality:



      The main idea was to do again a body using my "new" technique with wet cardboard. However, one of my colleague at the apprenticeship told me that I would get much better results using polyester and fiberglass (he was living in a town and me in the countryside, what a difference!). It was totally new for me and I had to do my experiences with that product. A small story about it I still remember: the instructions stated that it was important to have about 25°C to allow the polyester to set. I waited that my parents went away a Sunday afternoon to heat like hell the furnace in the living room using wood to get the desired temperature, even more, for my first experience. As it was probably autumn or winter, all windows were closed. I still hear the exclamations from my parents about the heat and the bad smelling when they came back!
      I learned quickly enough that a positive mold was necessary as first. Then, as a second step, a negative form should be done using the positive mold. Finally, the negative mold is to be used to get the final part. How easy it was with cardboard: not overheating needed, no bad smell and quickly done!
      How could I do the positive mold? I choose probably by accident the plaster. Not the one used by the sculptors but the cheap one to do walls and ceilings!
      It's easy to work with once it's dry (sometimes too easy) and it's doing a lot of dust. This later aspect was not important, the shop from my father was full of wood dust. A little more did not matter.

      The first result:



      Me at work, probably 1965 or 1966:




      The story about my 1:12 Studebaker Avanti
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  1. Egon's Avatar Moderator
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    Congratulation on your Birthday Roger, have a nice day
    QUOTE QUOTE #47

  2. markus68's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Happy Birthday, Roger.
    QUOTE QUOTE #48

  3. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Thanks to Egon and Markus!
    It's already over, was anyway a good day, doing planning on the V-16 frame!


    The story about my 1:12 Studebaker Avanti
    QUOTE QUOTE #49

  4. happyfreddy's Avatar Active Member
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    happy birthday too Roger. all the best and of course good health anyway
    QUOTE QUOTE #50

  5. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Thanks Freddy! Only 363 days to wait for the next one!

    March 09, 2008
    Here we are ! Here is the almost finished door panel.



    Missing are both moldings and the locking lever (wich is not functional). Those parts must be chromed first.

    The door’s bottom is not ready either : the carpet (velvet) is not yet glued. This will be done at the final assembly because the velvet is attracting the dust I’m producing in quantity.
    Now, I can do the other side.

    When all parts will be ready, all will be removed for the paint preparation.

    April 06, 2008
    What is that strange part? a misrepresented elk?



    Yes, this part will go into the model ; two accessories are missing. If they were there, the answer would be evident. On the real car, this is covered with vinyl. On the model, I will use some leather because of the thickness.


    The story about my 1:12 Studebaker Avanti
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  6. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    April 24, 2008
    It’s not a surprise that my question stayed unanswered! The strange part is the inner molding assembly with the overhead switch module. It’s not the nicest part of the model but will be hardly visible.



    The sunvisors can be lowered, as you can see.



    The leather on the frame is not yet glued ; it will be done at the final assembly.

    After the windshield molding, I did the rear ashtrays. They are not large : the outer frame is measuring 6 x 5mm. They are polished, ready to be chromed.



    The lids can be opened, of course.




    The story about my 1:12 Studebaker Avanti
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  7. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    May 19, 2008

    The jewellery
    There are just a few chromed parts on this vehicle; the hood emblem is one among them and its shape is particular. It seems easy to fabricate, but the difficulties are coming when starting the build! .

    Here it is, polished and ready to be chromed. The surface around the "S" will be black painted, like the real one which can be seen on the picture in the background.




    The story about my 1:12 Studebaker Avanti
    QUOTE QUOTE #53

  8. markus68's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    I love the details. Markus
    QUOTE QUOTE #54

  9. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Thanks Markus!


    The story about my 1:12 Studebaker Avanti
    QUOTE QUOTE #55

  10. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    July 18, 2008
    No, we are not yet in December, but what I will show to you is similar to the Christmas tree The story about my 1:12 Studebaker Avanti : we have a frame and we put the shiny things on it!
    Most certainly you guessed that I'm writing about the parts from the Avanti model which will go to the plater. It would be too risky and tedious to give the parts individually, therefore they are arranged on a frame made with heavy copper wire.

    People who are building plastic scale model will understand as all the parts are grouped on a similar system; it was the inspiration to do the same.
    The tree The story about my 1:12 Studebaker Avanti , pictured with a different position from the camera.





    There are 56 parts on this tree The story about my 1:12 Studebaker Avanti ; 3 parts do not belong to the Avanti; maybe some of you will discover which ones. This is only a part from the parts to be chromed. The next serie will include the bumpers, window frames and so on. I hope that all will go on that second tree The story about my 1:12 Studebaker Avanti .

    There will be a third one for parts having a dull chrome like the exhaust tubes, brake rotors and other small parts.


    The story about my 1:12 Studebaker Avanti
    QUOTE QUOTE #56

  11. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Toronado badging
    QUOTE QUOTE #57

  12. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Two steering wheels?
    QUOTE QUOTE #58

  13. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Quote Originally Posted by MODEL A MODEL View Post
    Toronado badging
    Good eye Don! This is absolutely correct. However, I don't see 2 steering wheel. It's the same tree The story about my 1:12 Studebaker Avanti on both photos, pictured from a different angle.


    The story about my 1:12 Studebaker Avanti
    QUOTE QUOTE #59

  14. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    August 05, 2008
    It’s is time to build the windshield wipers! Those parts are really small: the first picture is showing it. At the right, a part polished, ready to be chromed. On the left, the various parts needed to do the other wiper: the arm, which is articulated and the wiper blade, articulated too. Both large parts are shaped like a U, but the section is not constant, which is common to each wiper blade. Each complete wiper has a weight of a third of a gram, not enough heavy to have any effect on the suspension!
    On the model, the wipers will be attached with a screw from the inside; therefore, they will not be movable; a spring will maintain them against the windshield.



    August 24, 2008

    Details, details !

    You can see on the picture the battery, similar to the ones installed on 1953 to 1956 Cadillacs, then two horns. On their right, the voltage regulator; down on the left the relay for the horns; the last part is the relay for the starter motor which is independent from the motor, like on the Ford (and others) products.

    I’m slowly coming to the end with the fabrication of the parts; soon all the assembled parts from the body will be removed to prepare it for the paint. The same process will happen to the engine and the frame.



    The first batch from the parts to be chrome dis not yet ready; I’m getting nervous!


    The story about my 1:12 Studebaker Avanti
    QUOTE QUOTE #60

  15. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    August 29, 2008
    Finally, it’s done ! I could pick-up the finished parts. They will be stored until their definitive installation. However, some will be installed without delay: the moldings for the door panels, the ash trays for the rear and other small parts. The costs ? About $ 50.00. If those parts would have been at scale 1:1 The story about my 1:12 Studebaker Avanti , the costs would not be the same!





    This week, I began another large part: the name plate for the front end panel.



    This part is about 20 mm (0.8 ») in length; sorry, I forgot to use a coin for comparison). On a screen, this part is really rough but, seen in real life, the irregularities are not disturbing.
    This is one more part to be chromed!

    November 14, 2008

    Another tree The story about my 1:12 Studebaker Avanti was just completed. Those parts will not be shiny but mat chromed. As you can see, there is the complete exhaust system together with the clamps; the clamps for the radiator hoses and the brake rotors, plus other small parts.



    The second picture from this tree The story about my 1:12 Studebaker Avanti is from the back side.



    For all those who not guess how all that is done, I’m showing my machine « park ». First, the lathe. It’s not a large machine, but ideal to machine the brass.

    Turning steel is already more difficult due to a lack of rigidity.

    The lathe is used a milling machine or press drill with few changes.



    Here too, the lack of rigidity is not ideal for some milling work; therefore just little metal is removed each time and there is a forced break to let cool the motor. Sometimes, a more robust machine would help a lot but for that I would need more space which I don’t have!

    My first machine was more primitive and rather “flexible”. This machine is used (at the time of the report) as a flexible shaft or to polish the parts to be chromed.



    The other tools I have: some files, a small vice, some watchmaker tools and some dexterity!


    The story about my 1:12 Studebaker Avanti
    QUOTE QUOTE #61

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