Close

Page 8 of 8 FirstFirst ... 3 4 5 6 7 8
Results 106 to 115 of 115
    1. Kit: , by (Yearly Subscriber) Roger Zimmermann is online now
      Builder Last Online: Oct 2019 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/12 Rating:  Thanks: 2
      Started: 02-25-19 Build Revisions: Never  
      Supported Scratch Built

      People here know that I was doing for a long time a Continental Mark II; most may not know that prior to that model, I have also a 1963 Studebaker Avanti and a 1966 Oldsmobile Toronado, both also at the scale 1:12.
      If the Avanti is a pure static model, the Toronado has an electric motor, centrifugal clutch and a 2-speed transmission plus reverse. Window, seat and headlamp doors are electrically operated, but that's far from reliable as you will discover the next few days.
      The goal was to finish the model, but, like every old thing you are dealing with, surprises arrise, usually to our dismay. It will be the same here.


      Now that the Mark II is ready, I have to really finish the Toronado. Why did I not finish it many years ago? Probably because I was very busy with my real cars; anyway, the fact is that the electrical system was not completed and the seat was no more functioning.

      In the seventies or eighties, a neighbors did for me a voltage reducer: the electrical motor for the traction is fed with 6V, but the motors for windows, seat and headlamps are fed with 2V. I had no idea if this device would still function, I never tried it.

      During the break in January, I did a case for four 1.5V batteries, (it could be that I did not completed the model because I had no 6V source) similar to the box I did for the Mark II.

      The first thing I did was to hook that voltage reducer and try if the windows would work. Nothing! However, the inside illumination was on, so I knew that the voltage reducer was active.

      As I had nothing to lose, I tried with the 3V box from the Mark II. The LH window came up, but with a high pitch noise! The RH window came up and down without noise, but very slowly. The quarter windows were OK too, but much slower than I had in memory. The seat would not move and the headlamps would not come up.

      The first work was to open the LH door and remove the motor.



      In retrospect, I did a very good job as everything is attached with screws. Once the motor was out, I separated the motor from the reduction gear and let it run with 1.5V. I had then the confirmation that the vibration came from the motor and not from the reduction!



      I put some oil at the output shaft, without difference. The back is closed; I tried anyway to put a drop of oil on it. I assume that the capillarity from the construction let some oil come at the right place as with the time, the motor went to a quiet mode.



      It痴 now back in place, without noise. With 1.5V, it barely goes up and down when connecting the battery directly to the motor. Therefore, I tried again with 3V; it goes somewhat quicker, but you can almost get asleep in between. That痴 a design flaw: to improve the situation, I should use the same motors as the ones from the Mark II; this would require heavy modifications at the doors because the transmission (or reduction gear) is square.

      To understand what was happening and continue the electrical work, I had to remove the rear seat. I discovered the electrical mess under it; if I have the schematic of the system, I don稚 have identified the wires with the proper color, so I知 lost. There will be some detective work to find out.



      As some elements covered with leather were out, I cleaned them with a leather product. Despite the age (about 40 years old), they are in good shape; I must add that the mileage is maybe 10 yards!




      Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12
      Show Complete First Post

      Show Your Support

      • This build may not be copied, reproduced or published elsewhere without author's permission.
        Please note: The first post will be displayed at the top of every page.
    JOIN THE SMC ALLIANCE NOW

  1. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
    Name
    Roger
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    2,463
    You are right, Don. However, the weather is not very stable this period of the year. May was cold, wet, sometimes nice but not often. For the next few days, the forecast is telling that we will get as much as 28ーC!

    About the pictures: I spoke with somebody who is probably not so interested. As I have other duties for the moment (trying to find an air leak at the '57 Brougham suspension), I dit not went further with that idea.


    Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12
    QUOTE QUOTE #107

  2. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
    Name
    don
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Posts
    1,045
    Hello Roger,

    I know you are busy, and laying up some fiber glass parts is an inconvenience, but to demonstrate your technique to others who thought that they would have to invest in RTV Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12 for molds might be appreciated.

    If you have any resin Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12 laying around?
    QUOTE QUOTE #108

  3. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
    Name
    Roger
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    2,463
    Don, I cannot/will do that! It's not because I'm too busy; in fact I would have the time. What I could show is totally useless to others because the shape of the part to reproduce will be different, requiring maybe another approach with the mat. The main reason I will not show it is when I'm doing that, I have resin Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12 on both hands ; manipulating a camera under those circumstances is a no go!
    Further, my "technique" is far from perfect.
    Without picture and the smelling:
    Using the negative mold, cut the mat by avoiding tight bends, the mat will stay rather rigid even when wet with the resin Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12 . Usually, 2 layers of mat is enough to have a good thickness; the larger the part (or scale), the more layers are needed.
    Spray the mold with separating wax.
    Prepare the resin Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12 according to the specifications. As usual for 2 components stuff, the higher the temperature, the quicker it will set.
    In the real life, a gel coat is to be applied first. This is only interesting when the mold is perfect. Otherwise, it's a waste.
    Wet the mold surface with the resin Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12 (which will run everywhere, on the table, on your shoes) and put on that the pre-cut mat. Tap on it with a tool to be sure it will be wet with the resin Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12 . Fight with the air bubbles; no matter what you do, you will loose.
    Add so much mat as prepared looking that every layer is wet.
    Wait until the resin Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12 is set; it can be hours or less, depending the product and hardener quantity.

    If possible, don't do that inside the flat/house, you may have problem with your other half or wait until he/she is out for a long time!


    Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12
    QUOTE QUOTE #109

  4. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
    Name
    don
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Posts
    1,045
    Hi Roger,

    -So, the desk that you work on, is your "work bench". You paint in the kitchen, obviously, but all of your work is done on that one, average sized office desk?

    I have to have at least one 4 foot by 8 foot space, or two if I can spread out. I am constantly reminded by you and a few other modelers, of what is actually necessary and what is excess.

    I have over the years met several modelers who worked on folding "TV" tables, and / or worked on the kitchen table, and had to clear everything up so that meals could be eaten.

    The desire and focus to do the work are the greatest necessity, a place to work? -could be almost anything.

    -Don
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #110

  5. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
    Name
    Roger
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    2,463
    Yes Don! Plus, from time to time the kitchen for the paint work as you noted! To carve the wood model, I used my garage as my desk was not practical for rough work. To have more place is always good; necessary? Not for 1:12 scale model. For 1:8, my desk would probably be too small.

    As noted previously, the transmission is hardly to operate with the shift lever. Is a look inside the transmission useful? Who knows…
    The 13 screws were quickly removed; I just noticed that I did a gasket with blue RTV Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12 material, a product I do hate since I restored real cars. The transmission itself is very simple: a group of gears is sliding on the output shaft, allowing reverse, first and second gear. They are moved with the help of a cart, guided with two rods. The problem is at the steering column; I noticed during installation that the tube for the transmission is not moving freely. To improve it, I should remove again the steering column, carpet, dash…Sounds “d駛 vu”!
    As it makes no sense, the transmission pan was installed again, and the gear put in neutral.
    I still have to glue the back window (not a big deal); I can say that the Toronado is now completed and ready to sleep another 50 years!






    Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12
    Last edited by Roger Zimmermann; 06-09-19 at 08:21 AM.
    QUOTE QUOTE #111

  6. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
    Name
    don
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Posts
    1,045
    Thanks for sharing these insights to a remarkable model!

    So?

    Do you have anything more to do with the Avanti? or is it back to your 1:1 Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12 Cadillacs?
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #112

  7. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
    Name
    Roger
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    2,463
    No, nothing more to do! The maintenance work on the 1:1 Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12 cars will be done next; however, I have a small project in the back of my head, but it's too early to develop now.
    What I will do soon is to relate the changes I did on the Avanti. As I have more pictures about that, it may interest people.


    Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12
    QUOTE QUOTE #113

  8. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
    Name
    don
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Posts
    1,045
    Yes! Please do, your Avanti looks like a jewel!
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #114

  9. Jens Andersen's Avatar Active Member
    Name
    Jens
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    23
    Roger ..your in a league of your own !
    You dont know me but I have known of your work for a very long time. Im a fan !!
    Jens Andersen
    QUOTE QUOTE #115

  10. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
    Name
    Roger
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    2,463
    Thanks Jens! You saw probably what I'm doing on another forum because you are here since less than two years!


    Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12
    QUOTE QUOTE #116

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Quick Scale Calculator

 
Scale Calculator   Scale Factor   Real Size:     + Deluxe Scale Calculator
  1: th   Which equals Convert measurement: Reset or clear:  
  Any Scale   Scale Size:     + Deluxe Metric Calculator
 
Top