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    1. Kit: , by (Yearly Subscriber) Roger Zimmermann is offline
      Builder Last Online: Jun 2019 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/12 Rating:  Thanks: 1
      Started: 02-25-19 Build Revisions: Never  
      Supported Scratch Built

      People here know that I was doing for a long time a Continental Mark II; most may not know that prior to that model, I have also a 1963 Studebaker Avanti and a 1966 Oldsmobile Toronado, both also at the scale 1:12.
      If the Avanti is a pure static model, the Toronado has an electric motor, centrifugal clutch and a 2-speed transmission plus reverse. Window, seat and headlamp doors are electrically operated, but that's far from reliable as you will discover the next few days.
      The goal was to finish the model, but, like every old thing you are dealing with, surprises arrise, usually to our dismay. It will be the same here.


      Now that the Mark II is ready, I have to really finish the Toronado. Why did I not finish it many years ago? Probably because I was very busy with my real cars; anyway, the fact is that the electrical system was not completed and the seat was no more functioning.

      In the seventies or eighties, a neighbors did for me a voltage reducer: the electrical motor for the traction is fed with 6V, but the motors for windows, seat and headlamps are fed with 2V. I had no idea if this device would still function, I never tried it.

      During the break in January, I did a case for four 1.5V batteries, (it could be that I did not completed the model because I had no 6V source) similar to the box I did for the Mark II.

      The first thing I did was to hook that voltage reducer and try if the windows would work. Nothing! However, the inside illumination was on, so I knew that the voltage reducer was active.

      As I had nothing to lose, I tried with the 3V box from the Mark II. The LH window came up, but with a high pitch noise! The RH window came up and down without noise, but very slowly. The quarter windows were OK too, but much slower than I had in memory. The seat would not move and the headlamps would not come up.

      The first work was to open the LH door and remove the motor.



      In retrospect, I did a very good job as everything is attached with screws. Once the motor was out, I separated the motor from the reduction gear and let it run with 1.5V. I had then the confirmation that the vibration came from the motor and not from the reduction!



      I put some oil at the output shaft, without difference. The back is closed; I tried anyway to put a drop of oil on it. I assume that the capillarity from the construction let some oil come at the right place as with the time, the motor went to a quiet mode.



      Itís now back in place, without noise. With 1.5V, it barely goes up and down when connecting the battery directly to the motor. Therefore, I tried again with 3V; it goes somewhat quicker, but you can almost get asleep in between. Thatís a design flaw: to improve the situation, I should use the same motors as the ones from the Mark II; this would require heavy modifications at the doors because the transmission (or reduction gear) is square.

      To understand what was happening and continue the electrical work, I had to remove the rear seat. I discovered the electrical mess under it; if I have the schematic of the system, I donít have identified the wires with the proper color, so Iím lost. There will be some detective work to find out.



      As some elements covered with leather were out, I cleaned them with a leather product. Despite the age (about 40 years old), they are in good shape; I must add that the mileage is maybe 10 yards!




      Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12
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  1. ScaleMaster's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Mark
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    Absolutely stunning!!!! Just incredible!!!
    Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... - Mark D. Jones
    QUOTE QUOTE #92

  2. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger
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    Thanks Mark; your own construction is not bad either!


    Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12
    QUOTE QUOTE #93

  3. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    don
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    Beautiful photograph!
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #94

  4. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger
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    Thanks Don! I used a trick: with the camera's flash Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12 , it was just black. By using a small torch illuminating the dash and the flash Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12 , I had a much better result.


    Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12
    QUOTE QUOTE #95

  5. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger
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    Lately, Iím busier with real cars than with scale models. Ah! The joy working on an underdeveloped air suspension system (1957 Cadillac Eldorado Brougham)!
    Recently, I ordered small connectors for the external battery pack. Unfortunately, those connectors are too small to be practical; I ordered yesterday two different types; one will be the right one. The lack of suitable connectors is the reason why the rear seat is not yet into the model. To diminish the number of laying parts, I assembled the dash. If the attachment of the right portion of the dash is now known with the left radio knob screwed in the structure, I discovered that the left part is attached in a similar manner: the assembly is attached with a screw behind the A/C & heater control which is then glue at its place.
    The fillers Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12 under the dash are in place too; the left one is needed a bit of glue to stay in place.






    Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12
    QUOTE QUOTE #96

  6. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    don
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    Hello Roger,

    Again, more fascinating images from Switzerland!

    I have been working in the concept car field for about twenty years now, and I have assembled many dash boards, (IP)'s, over the years, especially clusters, instrument clusters, and the styling evolution is interesting!

    Some early cars had just the minimum, then inspired by the racecars, -instrumentation became more busy, even confusing. The "Jet - Age", with streamlined dials, and the huge speedometer of the early sixties, - a friends '64 Chevy had a speedometer that must have been 12 inches wide! Then the monolithic "cliff face" of your model and a few others.

    Now, heads-up displays are the fashion.

    -I have not gotten to it yet, of course, but the Ford Model A has an interesting dash-board. It doubles as the fuel tank!

    Thank you for all you show and share!

    -Don
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #97

  7. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    don
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    Hello Roger, any news on the magazine?

    Iíll have to subscribe to get a copy.

    -Don
    QUOTE QUOTE #98

  8. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger
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    As you asked for, I contacted the president, telling him that I sent some material to the whatever manager. Since that, no reaction.

    As far as the model is concerned: I just have a small problem with the wire moving the front seat. Fortunately, it's much more easy to work at that as it was for the quarter windows!


    Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12
    QUOTE QUOTE #99

  9. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Hello Roger,

    Are the seat cushions made in the same way as those in the Continental? -and did you use Brass to the same extant as you did with the Continental? Interior trim panels, . . . ? I am assuming the head-liner is fiber-glass? -Don

    PS, I have also shown this model to a few friends at work, and your fan base is growing!
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #100

  10. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger
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    Thanks for increasing my fan base! Fortunately, I'm not (yet) submerged with letter or emails!
    To your question about the material used for that model: the Mark II was the first model to use extensively brass. The Toronado seats and door panels are made with polyester and, like the Mark II, covered with leather. If you remember, I used wood as a ground material for the Mark II seats!
    The headliner is either a thin piece of polyester glued to the body and covered with leather or the shape of the headliner was carved at the roof inside, I don't remember and I cannot see it unless I'm taking it apart, which I would avoid!


    Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12
    QUOTE QUOTE #101

  11. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Obviously, that overhauling process is coming to an end. I bought recently small connectors and modified that large battery box changing the output from 6V to 3V and therefore I can eliminate the smaller box.
    The energy for the traction engine is done with the “fuel nozzle” inserted into the filler pipe. As the space to insert the nozzle is rather limited, I could construct a system which is satisfactory; therefore, I could reinstall the fuel tank.







    With this positive experience, I will replace the system I did for the Mark II with a similar design. Due to different filler tube diameter, I cannot use the same nozzle for both cars!
    The electrical engine is connected to a centrifugal clutch and to a 2-speed transmission providing also a reverse, park and neutral. The gears are selected by the lever at the steering column. With the front seat and steering wheel installed, it’s very cumbersome to move that lever, plus the bracket in the engine compartment acting as a relay is way too weak. This will stay as an experiment, totally useless!
    The current for the windows and headlamps will come from the battery box; a connector is laying into the trunk. To operate the various systems, it will be necessary to open the trunk and connect the battery box. With that in place, the rear seat was installed as well as the front seat for which I had to replace the string. I’m also satisfied how the seat is functioning.





    I still have to glue the back window in place. Who knows, maybe I will find another small repair to perform!


    Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12
    QUOTE QUOTE #102

  12. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    don
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    More WOW!,

    So? all the panel details, like in the floor panels. was carved into a plaster master, waxed, and then had fiber-glass laid into it? -to form that panel?

    Was de-molding a destructive process, or could you pull several panels if desired?

    -And for the electrical connections, I have, (A long time ago) run multiple connections at hard-points, where the model would rest upon while displayed. -then, of course "jack stands" disguising the electrical connections, down into a display base. This presumes planning for this style of circuitry.

    I love this model!
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #103

  13. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Yes, Don, they were made that way. Sometimes I used wax as a positive mold, then silicone rubber for the negative, mostly plaster for the body and floor. The body was a positive mold; the negatives ones were done with polyester/fiberglass. The master for the floor was done as a negative mold with plaster. It did not survive the separation! However, I may still have the negative molds for the body. Do you want them?
    Good idea with the jack stands to get the juice into the model!
    I have a different approach: the doing is interesting, like the windows or seat. When it's done, I rarely "play" with the models; they are really static objects.


    Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12
    QUOTE QUOTE #104

  14. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    I assume that Switzerland is nearing summer? Our spring showers are continuing still, here in the states.

    Have you gone any further in having a professional photographer photograph your Continental?

    Again, I assume that your countryside is beautiful this time of year.
    QUOTE QUOTE #105

  15. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    You are right, Don. However, the weather is not very stable this period of the year. May was cold, wet, sometimes nice but not often. For the next few days, the forecast is telling that we will get as much as 28įC!

    About the pictures: I spoke with somebody who is probably not so interested. As I have other duties for the moment (trying to find an air leak at the '57 Brougham suspension), I dit not went further with that idea.


    Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12
    QUOTE QUOTE #106

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