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    1. Kit: , by (Yearly Subscriber) Roger Zimmermann is offline
      Builder Last Online: Jun 2019 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/12 Rating:  Thanks: 1
      Started: 02-25-19 Build Revisions: Never  
      Supported Scratch Built

      People here know that I was doing for a long time a Continental Mark II; most may not know that prior to that model, I have also a 1963 Studebaker Avanti and a 1966 Oldsmobile Toronado, both also at the scale 1:12.
      If the Avanti is a pure static model, the Toronado has an electric motor, centrifugal clutch and a 2-speed transmission plus reverse. Window, seat and headlamp doors are electrically operated, but that's far from reliable as you will discover the next few days.
      The goal was to finish the model, but, like every old thing you are dealing with, surprises arrise, usually to our dismay. It will be the same here.


      Now that the Mark II is ready, I have to really finish the Toronado. Why did I not finish it many years ago? Probably because I was very busy with my real cars; anyway, the fact is that the electrical system was not completed and the seat was no more functioning.

      In the seventies or eighties, a neighbors did for me a voltage reducer: the electrical motor for the traction is fed with 6V, but the motors for windows, seat and headlamps are fed with 2V. I had no idea if this device would still function, I never tried it.

      During the break in January, I did a case for four 1.5V batteries, (it could be that I did not completed the model because I had no 6V source) similar to the box I did for the Mark II.

      The first thing I did was to hook that voltage reducer and try if the windows would work. Nothing! However, the inside illumination was on, so I knew that the voltage reducer was active.

      As I had nothing to lose, I tried with the 3V box from the Mark II. The LH window came up, but with a high pitch noise! The RH window came up and down without noise, but very slowly. The quarter windows were OK too, but much slower than I had in memory. The seat would not move and the headlamps would not come up.

      The first work was to open the LH door and remove the motor.



      In retrospect, I did a very good job as everything is attached with screws. Once the motor was out, I separated the motor from the reduction gear and let it run with 1.5V. I had then the confirmation that the vibration came from the motor and not from the reduction!



      I put some oil at the output shaft, without difference. The back is closed; I tried anyway to put a drop of oil on it. I assume that the capillarity from the construction let some oil come at the right place as with the time, the motor went to a quiet mode.



      It’s now back in place, without noise. With 1.5V, it barely goes up and down when connecting the battery directly to the motor. Therefore, I tried again with 3V; it goes somewhat quicker, but you can almost get asleep in between. That’s a design flaw: to improve the situation, I should use the same motors as the ones from the Mark II; this would require heavy modifications at the doors because the transmission (or reduction gear) is square.

      To understand what was happening and continue the electrical work, I had to remove the rear seat. I discovered the electrical mess under it; if I have the schematic of the system, I don’t have identified the wires with the proper color, so I’m lost. There will be some detective work to find out.



      As some elements covered with leather were out, I cleaned them with a leather product. Despite the age (about 40 years old), they are in good shape; I must add that the mileage is maybe 10 yards!




      Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12
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  1. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    As I was away from home for 2 weeks, I sent yesterday some texts and pictures. Let see what happens with this material!


    Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12
    QUOTE QUOTE #77

  2. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    A few vacation days in France plus some maintenance work on my 1:1 Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12 cars delayed the work on the Toronado. As I’m waiting parts for my ’57 Eldorado Brougham, I had time to finish the second front fender’s brace.
    After installing the LH front fender, I checked the alignment with the pumper. Surprise! The first brace was touching the brace tying the bumper end to the main bumper. What to do? Modify the brace? No! I adapted it to the other side without too much hassle and I did another one for the RH fender.



    The installation of the front bumper will not be easy: there is little distance between the bumper and the frame; unfortunately, I don’t have captive nuts inside the frame but a plate in two parts with threaded studs. How did I install the bumper years ago?
    Another element is now getting my attention: the gas tank. I will do like with the Mark II: the current for the main motor will be by inserting a “fuel hose” into the tank neck.




    Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12
    QUOTE QUOTE #78

  3. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    The spare wheel had to be secured in the trunk compartment. From the owner’s manual, I did a bracket, a strut which is anchored at the channel under both “Y” and a nut. From my old pictures, there is a cardboard on both sides of that structure. There is nothing in the middle; the spare wheel is hiding the view to the seat back’s construction. For a luxury coupe, the trim in the trunk compartment was minimalist compared to what is done now on most cars.






    Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12
    QUOTE QUOTE #79

  4. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    As the trunk’s inside is done, I found it was the time to install the lid. Only 4 screws and it’s done. Really? Well, I went just a hair away from the catastrophe: Since I did the paint many years ago, I had to slam the trunk lid to close it. I expected the same after the lid installation. It was, but I had to slam the lid much stronger. I did various experiments to improve the issue, all failed. The last slamming was almost fatal: I could no more open it: the “key”, in fact a screwdriver, went to the maximum rotation but the lid stayed closed. Trying to open it with a lot of force stayed without result. However, after a while, by lifting one end of the lid, the lid disengaged itself from the lock, without damage other than my ego. It was obvious that I had to remove the lock to see what’s wrong. Of course, I had to undo the trim near the lock…and I had to remember how, years ago, I installed the lock into the body. When it was out of the car, I opened it and saw nothing wrong. But, what is that small shiny bit of chromed metal lying on the desk? The first picture is showing the inside of the lock, without the cam.
    The lock is functioning that way: a cam, operated by the key, is pushing the detent lever. Obviously, I removed too much metal to that lever when I did the lock in the past century and, to save the detent lever, I soft soldered a very thin bit of brass. The bond decided to strike and the cam had no effect anymore. With a new detent lever, that misshapen is now solved. I also had to elongate the holes in the body to position the lock assembly higher. I can now close the lid without to slam it. The last image is the “new” lock, with some grease to lube it.






    Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12
    QUOTE QUOTE #80

  5. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Clever mechanism

    Micro-locksmithing!
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #81

  6. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Well, not quite! Indeed, I should have redesigned the system to be more efficient. With a painted body, I'm limiting the necessary work or improvements which may be dangerous for the paint.


    Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12
    QUOTE QUOTE #82

  7. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    As the trim in the trunk is ready, I think it would be time to go into the passenger compartment. As the carpet was destroyed when I began this overhaul, a new one must be done with velvet, as usual. I first covered the floor with paper, cutting the excess to have a pattern to cut the velvet. I did it in one piece; I saw later from my pictures that originally I did it in 2 pieces. The main concern with that carpet is to cut away as exactly as possible the indentation which will be occupied by the chrome/rubber trim under the driver’s feet.
    This time, I used a not too strong glue in case the carpet must be removed in a distant future!



    With the carpet installed, I could assemble the side arm rests in the back as well as the fillers Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12 between the side trim and seat back. Those fillers Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12 are attached to the side panel with two screws, but they can only be installed when the side panel is secured to the body. The last picture is showing that detail.




    Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12
    QUOTE QUOTE #83

  8. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Installed the front bumper back. Not quite easy because I have no captive nuts inside the frame. Instead, I silver soldered studs on 4 plates. To secure the bumper, I glued first a bit brass to both rear most plates and inserted that assembly in the frame’s channel and searched for the hole. When I found it, I pushed on that assembly to let emerge the stud and put the nut on it. Then I did the same with the front place using the same procedure.




    Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12
    QUOTE QUOTE #84

  9. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    I am so glad you chose to revisit this model!


    Until you started to peel back this particular onion, I had no idea what to expect.


    It isn’t bad.
    QUOTE QUOTE #85

  10. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Thanks Don!
    That's the difference between vehicles till the thirties compared to the more recent ones: the newer vehicles are hiding almost everything under a body; the early ones are showing almost everything.
    Recent cars are less spectacular as, to name a model, a Duesenberg from the thirties.


    Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12
    QUOTE QUOTE #86

  11. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    The clamps are now added to the upper radiator hose; it was time after so many years without them!



    I had a look at the hood lock; I cannot resist showing it to you, with the lock itself on the passenger side and the security catch on the driver side. Both are released by pulling the catch lever through the bumper aperture, like the original.





    Before the hood can be installed, I will sand Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12 and buff it to remove the orange peel Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12 . I did this treatment to most of the body. The orange peel Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12 can be clearly seen on the attached older picture.




    Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12
    QUOTE QUOTE #87

  12. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #88

  13. markus68's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Great craftsmanship.
    QUOTE QUOTE #89

  14. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Thanks Don and Markus!


    Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12
    QUOTE QUOTE #90

  15. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    The hood was sanded and installed. If the picture is dark, it’s on purpose because the one with a good light was less effective. You can compare the hood with the front fender’s sides; these curved surfaces will not be sanded and buffed because the risk here is too great to go through the clear coat Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12 .



    The floor mat structure was also installed; its shape is an elegant design as it makes an uninterrupted line with the dash. The junction can be seen on the picture; it’s the spot near the heater outlet. I will put some black leather paint to have it less obvious. The rubber mat itself is not yet glued on the metal part; on the picture the fit near the gas pedal is objectionable.




    Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12
    QUOTE QUOTE #91

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