Close

Page 5 of 8 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 LastLast
Results 61 to 75 of 115
    1. Kit: , by (Yearly Subscriber) Roger Zimmermann is offline
      Builder Last Online: Jul 2019 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/12 Rating:  Thanks: 1
      Started: 02-25-19 Build Revisions: Never  
      Supported Scratch Built

      People here know that I was doing for a long time a Continental Mark II; most may not know that prior to that model, I have also a 1963 Studebaker Avanti and a 1966 Oldsmobile Toronado, both also at the scale 1:12.
      If the Avanti is a pure static model, the Toronado has an electric motor, centrifugal clutch and a 2-speed transmission plus reverse. Window, seat and headlamp doors are electrically operated, but that's far from reliable as you will discover the next few days.
      The goal was to finish the model, but, like every old thing you are dealing with, surprises arrise, usually to our dismay. It will be the same here.


      Now that the Mark II is ready, I have to really finish the Toronado. Why did I not finish it many years ago? Probably because I was very busy with my real cars; anyway, the fact is that the electrical system was not completed and the seat was no more functioning.

      In the seventies or eighties, a neighbors did for me a voltage reducer: the electrical motor for the traction is fed with 6V, but the motors for windows, seat and headlamps are fed with 2V. I had no idea if this device would still function, I never tried it.

      During the break in January, I did a case for four 1.5V batteries, (it could be that I did not completed the model because I had no 6V source) similar to the box I did for the Mark II.

      The first thing I did was to hook that voltage reducer and try if the windows would work. Nothing! However, the inside illumination was on, so I knew that the voltage reducer was active.

      As I had nothing to lose, I tried with the 3V box from the Mark II. The LH window came up, but with a high pitch noise! The RH window came up and down without noise, but very slowly. The quarter windows were OK too, but much slower than I had in memory. The seat would not move and the headlamps would not come up.

      The first work was to open the LH door and remove the motor.



      In retrospect, I did a very good job as everything is attached with screws. Once the motor was out, I separated the motor from the reduction gear and let it run with 1.5V. I had then the confirmation that the vibration came from the motor and not from the reduction!



      I put some oil at the output shaft, without difference. The back is closed; I tried anyway to put a drop of oil on it. I assume that the capillarity from the construction let some oil come at the right place as with the time, the motor went to a quiet mode.



      It’s now back in place, without noise. With 1.5V, it barely goes up and down when connecting the battery directly to the motor. Therefore, I tried again with 3V; it goes somewhat quicker, but you can almost get asleep in between. That’s a design flaw: to improve the situation, I should use the same motors as the ones from the Mark II; this would require heavy modifications at the doors because the transmission (or reduction gear) is square.

      To understand what was happening and continue the electrical work, I had to remove the rear seat. I discovered the electrical mess under it; if I have the schematic of the system, I don’t have identified the wires with the proper color, so I’m lost. There will be some detective work to find out.



      As some elements covered with leather were out, I cleaned them with a leather product. Despite the age (about 40 years old), they are in good shape; I must add that the mileage is maybe 10 yards!




      Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12
      Show Complete First Post

      Show Your Support

      • This build may not be copied, reproduced or published elsewhere without author's permission.
        Please note: The first post will be displayed at the top of every page.
    JOIN THE SMC ALLIANCE NOW

  1. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
    Name
    don
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Posts
    1,017
    Good question
    QUOTE QUOTE #62

  2. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
    Name
    Roger
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    2,200
    The knob at the dash operates the motor to open the headlamps and control also the light. When I pull the button, the light are immediately on and the motor is opening the lamps. When I push the button, the lights are immediately off and the motor closes the headlamp doors.
    In other words: the switch at the dash has two separate functions: controlling the lights and operating the motor.


    Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12
    QUOTE QUOTE #63

  3. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
    Name
    Roger
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    2,200
    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Bartrop View Post
    He had an Austin Princess, but it was lost in a crash when I was too young to remember.
    Unusual car in North America. OK, Canada had once more English brands than the US, Commonwealth heritage!


    Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12
    QUOTE QUOTE #64

  4. Richard Bartrop's Avatar Active Member
    Name
    Richard
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    54
    Oh yes, growing up in the '60s and '70s in British Columbia, they were everywhere here, but they're pretty much vanished from the face of the earth since then.
    QUOTE QUOTE #65

  5. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
    Name
    Roger
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    2,200
    Some days ago, I had to remove the RH front fender: the upper pin for the door hinge was protruding too much and was pushing against the fender, creating a bulge in the polyester. Retrospectively, it explain why I had difficulties to have the lower part of the fender aligned with the door.
    After one hour, everything was back in place and after a while, the bulge disappeared.
    There is another part which I always wanted to do, but delayed and delayed: the front air dam. I had not too much documentation about that; I found in Google 2 decent pictures how the dam should look like. There are still more parts I will not do: left and right from the main dam, there are 2 smaller dams which are following the inner side of the frame.
    As I have no more 0.2 or 0.3mm brass, I took 0.1mm material. This thin brass is giving about the same flexibility than the real one which is made with plastic!




    Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12
    QUOTE QUOTE #66

  6. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
    Name
    don
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Posts
    1,017
    OK! I've seen enough, Roger did you ever document this model before? A magazine article, or enter a national club contest? or something? In addition to being a superb model maker, you are also a modest man!

    I have studied model making and modelers my whole adult life. I have been lucky enough to be able to examine one of Mr. Wingrove's Blower Bentleys, holding it in my gloved hands. I have seen a completely rapid prototyped model of Honda's first grand prix car, made by and with all the resources of America Honda. My shop had many scratch-built IPMS Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12 USA National contest winners in our displays. -and in other fields, nautical and aviation, and also museum, especially some of the Natural History Museum displays, I have seen a lot! -and I was obviously looking in the wrong direction!

    To recreate anything in miniature is the definition of model making, and to do anything however simple, but to do it complete is all that anyone can expect. But most of the professional modelers, worked in racing cars. Some of those are rather complicated, Sr. Olive's Maserati Birdcage Type 61, Mr. Wingrove's Type 59 or his "Tulip-Wood" Hispano-Suisa. But its not until you look at Mr. Baigent's 250 GT, or Sr. Olive's BMW 507 that we see something approaching your work!

    I hereby declare you, Roger Zimmermann the King of Modelers!

    -Don
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #67

  7. happyfreddy's Avatar Active Member
    Name
    freddy
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    93
    Don, I fully agree and nothing to Your last sentence is worth to be added
    Chapeau Roger !!
    QUOTE QUOTE #68

  8. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
    Name
    Roger
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    2,200
    Ah! Don, I will have trouble to go from one room to another: the doors are not high enough, the crown will hit the upper frame!
    If I had to work so quickly as the men you cited in your response, I could never have added so many details.
    In response to your question: I wrote years ago something in the magazine from a French car club. During the construction from the Toronado, a friend working for a car newspaper wrote an article, with many pictures (I did the pictures, he wrote the text in French). That's all I did. At that time, I as in a perfect isolation because, with the exception of a few strange people, who is putting so much tim in a "toy"? I did it because I liked it, period.
    I'm not a guy who likes to be in the front; I'm so well when I can silently do what I have to do. Th difference between then and now: Internet. With that medium, I could show without much effort what I did or what I'm doing. Strangely enough, I'm totally unknown in Europe (with the exception of the Europeans coming here) but when I see that I will have soon 400'000 views in the AACA forum (the number of views here is not bad either) which is not at all scale models relative, I'm wondering why so "popular" in the US and no one from Switzerland is interested? We have a sentence in French describing this paradox, like "nobody is a prophet in his own country"
    Do I care from this situation? Not at all! I'm enjoying to correspond here with people as mad as me, or answering to people who ask questions in the other forum, that's all!
    By the way, I was invited to come here by Dougritt.

    Oh! thanks Freddy, I saw your answer when I sent my comments!


    Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12
    QUOTE QUOTE #69

  9. happyfreddy's Avatar Active Member
    Name
    freddy
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    93
    Roger , donīt worry about that . Many filmstars become more popular first, when
    have made a film in foreign countries - not at home !
    You can ask why is it so - but You never will get any answer. Iīm sure that in your
    country are many "scale-model-makers" , but itīs hard to find out where they are
    located. Perhaps they only like to work for theirselves and donīt want any publicity.
    Others present their buildings at steam engine shows like in Friedrichshafen or
    Sinsheim in southern Germany.
    Today with Internet itīs much easier to find out where those people are located.
    So same way I did when searching for informations about scratch bulding of cars,
    ie how to form such things from brass sheets.
    The first pictures I found have been those from Markus68 with his Mercedes.
    He told me about Your work in this forum , so I got my account here. But to read
    and get needed informations here doesnīt mean thatīs all. Even when interested
    it also means to post any ideas about any problems others have and I surely know
    that Your level is not the same as mine. So be sure that all You let us be part of it
    You posted with text and pictures are more helpful to anybody than You can imagine.

    So when Don says : You are the King of Modelers
    it means same like an OSCAR in film industrie or like a STAR on walk of fame.
    ie those words are only small words of any thanks for Your engagement to let us be
    part of it.
    Thanks again
    Last edited by happyfreddy; 04-02-19 at 11:45 AM.
    QUOTE QUOTE #70

  10. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
    Name
    don
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Posts
    1,017
    Hello Roger,

    When you were building your Toronado, or since, had you tried to contact any of the owners groups, or clubs, that exist? At that time, pre-web, it would not have been easy for you, but now? I'm sure that those people would be amazed to see your work!

    www.toronado.org

    They have a magazine, the FRONT WHEEL DRIVER

    -Don
    Last edited by MODEL A MODEL; 04-06-19 at 10:50 PM.
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #71

  11. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
    Name
    Roger
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    2,200
    Oscar, star, king...That's too much! I'm just me, a guy who fall on his head with 15!

    Don, I believe someone having a Toronado asked me years ago if he could tell that group about my model. Never heard anything anymore.
    Indeed, I could try to contact that club directly to see if there is some interest. I'll do that soon.


    Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12
    Last edited by Roger Zimmermann; 04-03-19 at 03:28 AM. Reason: Comment added
    QUOTE QUOTE #72

  12. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
    Name
    Roger
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    2,200
    Don, I just wrote to this owner association; let see what they will answer!


    Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12
    QUOTE QUOTE #73

  13. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
    Name
    don
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Posts
    1,017
    Hello Roger, -did you include any of your pictures? I cannot imagine them not being impressed! -Don
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #74

  14. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
    Name
    Roger
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    2,200
    Unfortunately, I could not do that in the contact "window", or I did not see the possibility. If they are curious, they will answer, if not, I will survive!


    Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12
    QUOTE QUOTE #75

  15. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
    Name
    Roger
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    2,200
    Recently, I got an answer from the Toronado. I will send some text and pictures as they seems interested to see what I did.


    Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12
    QUOTE QUOTE #76

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Quick Scale Calculator

 
Scale Calculator   Scale Factor   Real Size:     + Deluxe Scale Calculator
  1: th   Which equals Convert measurement: Reset or clear:  
  Any Scale   Scale Size:     + Deluxe Metric Calculator
 
Top