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    1. Kit: , by (Yearly Subscriber) Roger Zimmermann is offline
      Builder Last Online: May 2019 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/12 Rating:  Thanks: 1
      Started: 02-25-19 Build Revisions: Never  
      Supported Scratch Built

      People here know that I was doing for a long time a Continental Mark II; most may not know that prior to that model, I have also a 1963 Studebaker Avanti and a 1966 Oldsmobile Toronado, both also at the scale 1:12.
      If the Avanti is a pure static model, the Toronado has an electric motor, centrifugal clutch and a 2-speed transmission plus reverse. Window, seat and headlamp doors are electrically operated, but that's far from reliable as you will discover the next few days.
      The goal was to finish the model, but, like every old thing you are dealing with, surprises arrise, usually to our dismay. It will be the same here.


      Now that the Mark II is ready, I have to really finish the Toronado. Why did I not finish it many years ago? Probably because I was very busy with my real cars; anyway, the fact is that the electrical system was not completed and the seat was no more functioning.

      In the seventies or eighties, a neighbors did for me a voltage reducer: the electrical motor for the traction is fed with 6V, but the motors for windows, seat and headlamps are fed with 2V. I had no idea if this device would still function, I never tried it.

      During the break in January, I did a case for four 1.5V batteries, (it could be that I did not completed the model because I had no 6V source) similar to the box I did for the Mark II.

      The first thing I did was to hook that voltage reducer and try if the windows would work. Nothing! However, the inside illumination was on, so I knew that the voltage reducer was active.

      As I had nothing to lose, I tried with the 3V box from the Mark II. The LH window came up, but with a high pitch noise! The RH window came up and down without noise, but very slowly. The quarter windows were OK too, but much slower than I had in memory. The seat would not move and the headlamps would not come up.

      The first work was to open the LH door and remove the motor.



      In retrospect, I did a very good job as everything is attached with screws. Once the motor was out, I separated the motor from the reduction gear and let it run with 1.5V. I had then the confirmation that the vibration came from the motor and not from the reduction!



      I put some oil at the output shaft, without difference. The back is closed; I tried anyway to put a drop of oil on it. I assume that the capillarity from the construction let some oil come at the right place as with the time, the motor went to a quiet mode.



      It’s now back in place, without noise. With 1.5V, it barely goes up and down when connecting the battery directly to the motor. Therefore, I tried again with 3V; it goes somewhat quicker, but you can almost get asleep in between. That’s a design flaw: to improve the situation, I should use the same motors as the ones from the Mark II; this would require heavy modifications at the doors because the transmission (or reduction gear) is square.

      To understand what was happening and continue the electrical work, I had to remove the rear seat. I discovered the electrical mess under it; if I have the schematic of the system, I don’t have identified the wires with the proper color, so I’m lost. There will be some detective work to find out.



      As some elements covered with leather were out, I cleaned them with a leather product. Despite the age (about 40 years old), they are in good shape; I must add that the mileage is maybe 10 yards!




      Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12
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  1. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger
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    Well, Don, on that body style, there was no other way. But I was junger and had better eyes (I mean no glasses)! On the Mark II, I could fabricate many interior parts when the roof was not yet installed, it was a nice help.

    What was I thinking when I began this model in the sixties? I found notes about brake light and I remember doing a functional directional signal lever. The fact is that I installed tiny bulbs at the back together with larger ones. I did also a strange electrical circuit with a 6V wire connected to a derivation box and from that box, a wire going into the trunk. For what purpose? Brake lights? It could be. Anyway, there is no brake switch at the brake pedal and I have no intention to do one. I removed that wire and the black wires which were connected to the large bulbs are now cut because I have no idea where they are ending towards the front of the model. And, of course, there is no documentation.

    I rewired the small tail bulbs as I explained previously and did a functional test. 2 bulbs were hardly lit when current was applied. If all bulbs would be connected in parallel, there would hardly be a difference. But with 2 bulbs in serie, if the internal resistance is not near the same, the brightness of each bulb is considerably different. I had to match at least two bulbs to have an acceptable result. If I remember well, some bulbs have a resistance of 8 Ohm and other near 10 Ohms.

    Now, the back is ready, I can go to the front and find how the system should be functioning.



    As you can see, the end panel was made with brass, like the gutter for the trunk. The license plate is of course installed on hinges.


    Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12
    QUOTE QUOTE #47

  2. Betto's Avatar Member
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    Benedetto
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    Hi Roger.... my jaws keep dropping to the ground
    Wonderful report from sixties, I was just a kid.
    QUOTE QUOTE #48

  3. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Thanks Betto! I was not much older than you at that time!


    Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12
    QUOTE QUOTE #49

  4. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Indeed, the electrical system for the retracting headlamp is OK. Again, I had to search a bit; I had current to the motor but only if I added a ground. Then, I remembered that there is a ground wire at the inside switch. As I was not sure if I had to remove again the dash surround, I put only one screw; the nut was embedded in the polyester, therefore, I could not have a ground! Once the proper screw was torqued, the motor for the headlamps turned in the desired direction depending to the position of the headlamp switch. As the motor is now fed with 3V, it may too much voltage for this application. At first, I tried with 2 x 30 Ohm resistors in serie, but the motor could hardly open the doors. With just one, it’s better but I had to “massage" the actuating rod to have the proper tension (either open or closed) at the LH headlamp door. As the rod actuating it is double the length from the RH side, it’s no wonder why it’s a bit tricky.
    The pictures are showing the actuating rod, the bell crank and finally the actuating motor and the hidden resistor.








    Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12
    Last edited by Roger Zimmermann; 03-27-19 at 06:15 AM. Reason: spelling
    QUOTE QUOTE #50

  5. markus68's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    QUOTE QUOTE #51

  6. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Before I soldered the headlamp wires to the main lead, I tested several times the headlamp system. It’s functioning well now that I solved the problem created by the LH headlamp door going too far inside the front panel and jamming.
    The light provided by the 4 headlamps is not very bright; the purpose was not a great illumination but a functioning one.
    The orange/white wire is for the parking lamps located in the front bumper.
    Now, most problems are solved, it’s time to install the parts lying around and do a new carpet.






    Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12
    QUOTE QUOTE #52

  7. happyfreddy's Avatar Active Member
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    Great work Roger

    Donīt worry about brightness of headlamps . When I remember You had registrated the Toronado in the mid 70ties in France first.
    At that time all headlights of french cars had yellow lamps - much better for the eyes than the horrible LED / XENON light of today cars
    QUOTE QUOTE #53

  8. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Interesting answer, Freddy: on another forum, somebody wrote "tell that the car was registered in France!"
    The first 2 Cadillac I bought, the 1956 Sedan de Ville and the 57 Eldorado Brougham had yellow headlamps. I can understand for the first one, as the owner went in France on a regular basis. Why the Brougham had yellow lamps is a mystery. Maybe the first owner, a professor in Basel, went also in France with that car. To your dismay, one of the first things I did was to discard those yellow lamps. And, funny enough, I could sell them!


    Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12
    QUOTE QUOTE #54

  9. happyfreddy's Avatar Active Member
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    Roger , when You remember the 70ties many cars had extra headlights just for fog
    situations and the colour of this light was YELLOW. With yellow light itīs more
    efficient to have a good sight than with white light.
    With white light lamps You only look at a big white wall and You never will registrate
    anything. Same situation today all the night when You meet a car with LED or Xenon
    headlight specially if itīs a SUV or pickup :
    You always have problems to look not directly in this light. If it happens You will see
    NOTHING for seconds - just the same when looking direct in the sunlight and Iīm sure
    You wonīt do this. So the only method today is using special yellow glasses to protect
    yourself against such headlights.
    Iīll think itīs only a question of time till first medical problems will happen caused of
    LED/Xenon headlight. The second problem today is the permanent "driving light".
    In result You only pay attention if there is any light in traffic which You must recognise .
    So often walking people or others will not been seen because
    " there was no upcoming light" , ie You donīt pay same attention like in years without
    the "driving light" . I still remember the 70ties when in France it was allowed to drive
    in cities with no headlight or even parking light. You drove with less speed
    and even with MORE ATTENTION.
    Last edited by happyfreddy; 03-28-19 at 06:50 AM.
    QUOTE QUOTE #55

  10. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Well, Freddy, you may be right. I'm not too disturbed by the Xenon or LED lights but I don't drive too often during the night.

    Now, I'm really finishing the model: there are small parts I never did for an unknown reason. For example, when the headlamps are closed, a shield is protecting them against dirt. On my past pictures from the front end, it’s obvious that the shields are missing. They are now added. Today, I installed the RH front fender. Another part was never done: the small braces securing the lower front end from the fenders to the radiator cradle. One is now added, I will paint it when the other one is done.




    Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12
    QUOTE QUOTE #56

  11. Richard Bartrop's Avatar Active Member
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    My dad had a burgundy '67 Toronado. Even in the '70s it still looked like something out of the future. I remember the doors were like closing a bank vault, especially when it was parked on an incline.
    QUOTE QUOTE #57

  12. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Your father had a good taste! '67 models were at 98% identical to the '66 models. The most notable differences: the grilles front and rear had small squares and the false air intake above the headlamps were gone. There were also minor trim differences. And yes, the doors were extremely long and heavy, compared to the other 2-door models!


    Finishing my 66 Olds Toronado, scale 1:12
    QUOTE QUOTE #58

  13. Richard Bartrop's Avatar Active Member
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    I think I actually prefer the look of the '67 to the '66, but the original is still a sweet set of wheels.

    And yes he did. He had an Austin Princess, but it was lost in a crash when I was too young to remember. The first one I remember was 1955 Cadillac. Dad liked the land yachts for the room, and Mom insisted on two doors as she was convinced me and my sister would hurl ourselves into traffic at the first opportunity, so I got used to putting my back into closing a car door. I still have to watch myself when I'm in something more compact.
    QUOTE QUOTE #59

  14. happyfreddy's Avatar Active Member
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    Roger , do You switch the headlights when closed off automaticly or are they permanent shining ?
    QUOTE QUOTE #60

  15. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Good question
    QUOTE QUOTE #61

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