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    1. Kit: Pocher Bugatti type 50 Coupé de Ville, by (Yearly Subscriber) ThierryD86 is online now
      Builder Last Online: Aug 2017 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/8 Rating:  (1 votes - 5.00 average) Thanks: 4
      Started: 09-10-16 Build Revisions: Never  
      Supported Includes Transkit Restoration Attribution
      Build in Progress



      Hello

      As I said in my introduction on this forum, 26 years have passed since I've begun the assembly of this precious and rare model, and 24 since I abandonned it on the shelf, gathering dust and rust.
      Recently, I woke up, and decided to re-start it, and, if possible, achieve it.
      I disassembled entirely the model and began this resurrection !


      Actually, "she" is in this state:
      - Chassis with frame rails, brakes, fuel tank, rear and front axle assembled
      - engine with many extra details ( according to the reference photos of Paul Koo's DVD and other found on the net, particularly on gallery section of Tthis website), mounted on the chassis with B002 Engine mount of MCM (Thanks Marvin )
      - Steering box installed with personal and extra detailing.
      - Engine mounted on the frame.
      - Extra detailed firewall achieved and mounted
      - Radiator with some improvements mounted too

      I've added or am going to doit, numerous parts or advanced features as:
      - Speedometer cable
      - Tachometer cable
      - Functional linkage of accelerator Pocher Bugatti type 50 Coupé de Ville: à résurrection.
      working on carburetors and supercharger
      And many others...


      As much as possible, I used bolts instead of screws, and, where not, I painted the screws in black, to hide them.
      The chassis was painted with automotive black primer Pocher Bugatti type 50 Coupé de Ville: à résurrection. , which gave it a softly grained aspect.
      For all the engine parts, I used Alclad Pocher Bugatti type 50 Coupé de Ville: à résurrection. metal paints with my airbrush Pocher Bugatti type 50 Coupé de Ville: à résurrection. , and here and there, tamiya Pocher Bugatti type 50 Coupé de Ville: à résurrection. paints with a soft or a dry brush.
      Many details are scratched with aluminium sheet (0.3 mm thickness), Styrène sheet and rods, brass or copper or alu tubes and rods (from 0.3 mm to 2 mm) , micro bolts and threaded rod, micro washers, destroyed watch parts or photo-etched parts(engine cam covers, photo-etched grill for the radiator), thanks to Ebay
      Several parts have been modified when necessary, especially to make them closer to the real ones.


      And now, some overviews of the model, in its actual state....more detailed photos of the step by step building to go later if anybody is interested


















      Ps: I didn't found the way to put an explicit picture of my building before the title of the thread.. So, if anyone could help me...

      Build Photos

      Pocher Bugatti type 50 Coupé de Ville: à résurrection.-chargement-jpg Pocher Bugatti type 50 Coupé de Ville: à résurrection.-k84-jpg 


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  1. ThierryD86's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Pocher Bugatti type 50 Coupé de Ville: à résurrection.
    I would like to show you now the re-building of the engine.

    When I bought this kit, in 1990, a few days after my youngest son was born, the Internet was just starting, I didn't own any personal computer and hadn't yet visited the Bugatti museum in Molsheim.
    My tools stock was limited and I hadn't built any model for over a decade, so, I was unexperimented and scrupulously respected the building plans... Of course, I got a poor result !

    Today , we have the Internet, forums, reference photos and a batallion of excellent modellers who share all their works, tips and tricks and methods.
    It's easiest to get a result that is closer to the prototype.

    The following pics were taken in june 2016 and show the plastic parts of the engine assembled and sprayed.
    Several parts of the engine have not tolerated the weight of years , as the right engine cam cover , that has twisted and gave me many difficulties and serious headaches.


    I've modified the 4 inspection panels, with engine-turning inside (engine-turning was applied on a thin alu sheet 0.3 mm thickness, the sheet cutted at the good dimensions and the plates finally glued in place on the plastic part).

    I began the assembly of the lubrication pipes, according to Paul Koo's DVD.
    With the difference that I did'nt use alu rods but brass ones...They are more difficult to cut and drill, but I prefer their glossy aspect .
    The parts that form connectors or banjos were joined using soldering or brazing and not CA gel, and then, each sub-assembly has been glued in place on the engine.














    Then, I scratched the extra details of the fuel supply system on the carburetors, and the levers on the carburateurs that enable to increase or decrease the acceleration.

    These levers are functionnal, i.e they can move around their shaft, and are joined together to move synchronously.
    Later, a linkage will join the acceletor system on the firewall to these levers, and the whole system will move, pressing the accelerator pedal..

    Ingredients: Alu sheet, brass M1 micro-bolts, 0.8 and 1.5 mm brass rod, micro washers, micro-nuts and threadlock





    And after building the second lever, and joining them:








    An overview:






    And finally, I've scratch-built the linkage that control the acceleration on the supercharger.
    It too is "functional" as the previous one...
    And I scratch-built too the lubrication line behind the supercharger
    Same "ingredients", plus alu rod










    As of now, that's all Folks
    Let you digest that enormous post


    Pocher Bugatti type 50 Coupé de Ville: à résurrection.
    Last edited by ThierryD86; 09-11-16 at 07:08 AM.
    QUOTE QUOTE #2

  2. Egon's Avatar Moderator
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    Pocher Bugatti type 50 Coupé de Ville: à résurrection.
    It looks fine so far, do you know there are gear and chain on the brake lines in front and the middle, I havn't found a pic of the rear brakes.
    Attached Images Attached Images Pocher Bugatti type 50 Coupé de Ville: à résurrection.-p6060214-jpg Pocher Bugatti type 50 Coupé de Ville: à résurrection.-img038-jpg Pocher Bugatti type 50 Coupé de Ville: à résurrection.-img037-jpg Pocher Bugatti type 50 Coupé de Ville: à résurrection.-br-de-jpg 
    Last edited by Egon; 09-11-16 at 09:11 AM.
    QUOTE QUOTE #3

  3. ThierryD86's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Pocher Bugatti type 50 Coupé de Ville: à résurrection.
    Here is the continuation with pics of the detailed engine, and some explanations about how and why I did things.
    These pics were taken in july and early august 2016.


    To begin, some overviews:

    Left Side:


    Right side:

    Front view:


    Rear view:

    Top view:

    Three-quaters view:




    You can see these extra details:

    - 1/ Brass bolts and nuts everywhere I could, to replace plastic ones, or added where necessary and not figured/included in the kit parts.
    - 2/ Aluminium Engine head covers bought on ebay, with extra detailing added on them
    - 3/ scratch re-built magneto with added levers and "authentic" electric wiring from MMC, and scratch-built locking latches
    - 4/ Purge valve under the water-pump
    - 5/ Oil purge valve on the upper right side inspection panel of the engine block
    - 6/ metal heat shields on the exhaust pipes
    - 7/ Alu loom guiding and hiding spark plugs ignition cables
    - 8/ Scratch-built aluminium spark plugs sockets
    - 9/ Alu plates on the front panel of the engine and on the front of the parts n° 76691-692 (cooling pump of the supercharger ?)
    - 10/ And others whose name and function I ignore !
    - 11/ The chromed watercooling manifold has been sanded and painted with Alclad Pocher Bugatti type 50 Coupé de Ville: à résurrection. chrome, then gloss cleared.

    Details in the next posts


    Pocher Bugatti type 50 Coupé de Ville: à résurrection.
    QUOTE QUOTE #4

  4. ThierryD86's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Quote Originally Posted by Egon View Post
    It looks fine so far, do you know there are gear and chain on the brake lines in front and the middle, I havn't found a pic of the rear brakes.
    Yes I do, and I'm thinking about this.
    At the moment, the brake system hasn't be installed yet on the model.. I've several ideas to intent scratchbuild this real brake system... Not sure it can be done !
    I'll see that when time comes

    The second pic you put in your post refers to the bottom of the brake pedal, not to the gears and chain near brake drums.


    Pocher Bugatti type 50 Coupé de Ville: à résurrection.
    Last edited by ThierryD86; 09-11-16 at 10:21 PM.
    QUOTE QUOTE #5

  5. ThierryD86's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Pocher Bugatti type 50 Coupé de Ville: à résurrection.
    Continuation of the previous post: details of building the engine

    1/ Brass bolts and nuts: For example on the front panne of the engine (front cover)

    In the kit, this panel is fixed on the body with 6 uggly screws, that of course don't exist in the real car, where this front cover is bolted with 12 bolts on the body !

    I glued the front cover on the body after drilling missing holes, and then inserted bolts in these slots
    I used M1 brass bolts with small size head, whose lenght was reduced.





    2/ Aluminium Engine head covers found on ebay



    These etched-parts had to be shaped on the engine plastic covers, and in view of the material hardness, it wasn't an easy job, but the result is amazing



    The etched nuts coming with these covers are of poor quality, so I replaced them by M1 brass nuts and washers, screwed on M1 brass bolts that were inserted in the slots from the inside of the covers

    On the right engine head cover, I've placed on 2 /4 nuts, two cable holders (grommets) . They'll be used for the further guiding of a cable that join the radiator and the water temperature indicator display on the dashboard, running through the firewall.




    The cable holder is scratchbuilt with a small strip of alu sheet, were I shaped, with a needle-file, a notch, that will come onto the threaded shank of the bolt, like a jumper. The strip is then rolled over a M1.5 rod to round it as a little tunnel.






    3/ scratch re-built magneto with added levers and "authentic" electric wiring from MMC, and scratch-built locking latches

    The kit's instructions show you the assembly with a long screw of two parts that form the magneto (distributor). According with the diagram, the ignition lead set comes out the magneto through a slot existing between the two parts:



    This is absolutely wrong !

    The 8 spark plug wires come out of the distributor through 8 holes located at the top of it, and regularly spaced around its circumference.
    These holes are numbered from 1 to 8 on the cover of the distributor. what I depicted with 8 silvered points (my eyes ar 58 years olds, my hands trembled and I didn't manage to paint the numeric characters)

    I filled the slot between body and cover of magneto with styrene sheet, then triming and sanding, primer and airbrush sprays, satin black for the body and hull red for the cover

    For the ignition wires, I used ignition wire provided by ModelMotorCars, yellow with thin black bands, that are really electrical wire, and that relatively well simulate the ignition cables available at this time.

    On the body of the magneto, I put a decal where we can read (with better eyes than mine) the trade mark of the supplier: SCINTILLA, that was a Swiss manufacturer of electrical apparatus.

    The decals for this Bugatti are available on a dutch website: http://www.decal-she...gatti-18-decals

    On the right of the magneto's stand, you see a T-shaped lever that ends with threaded rod.
    From what I understood, this lever permitted to act on a micrometric screw, in order to adjust the timing ignition point, according to the octane rating of the gasoline.


    On the left side, you can see a lever, that was linked through the firewall, to a lever on the dashboard, and that permitted, unless I'm mistaken, to adjust the timing ignition point according to the engine running speed...




    At last, the cover of this magneto is maintained on the body by two metallic clips, S-shaped, I scratchbuilt with iron wire 0.5 mm diameter, and micro-bolts

    ]



    4/ Purge valve under the water-pump

    While studying reference photos, I've noticed that there was a valve under the pump's body.
    So, I scratchbuilt one, with brass tubes and rods, and brass nuts. I used here glue (CA gel) to join the parts.




    5/ Oil purge valve on the upper left side pannel of the engine block

    While studying reference photos, I've noticed too that there was a second valve on the upper right inspection panel.
    So, I scratchbuilt one, with brass tubes and rods, and brass nuts. Here too, I used glue (CA gel) to join the parts.



    On this last picture, you can notice too that I've modified the connectors located at the back end of the plates that cover the crankcase, and where will connect later the copper pipes coming out of the firewall.

    6/ metal heat shields on the exhaust pipes

    They were scratchbuilt using my "all purpose" alu sheet of 0.3 mm thickness.

    I've cutted in this sheet a plate whose shape matched more or less the exhaust one, and then adjust it, try after try, with a soft cardboard file.


    Once satisfied, nothing simpler to fix it on the exhaust with a M1 brass bolt




    7/ Alu loom guiding and hiding spark plugs ignition cables

    At that time, the spark plug ignition cables rarely goes directly from the distributor to the spark plugs.
    In order to protect them of the heat of engine, and to clean up the engine compartment, they often were guided to their location in a metallic tube which carried as full of holes that there was spark plugs, each hole located in front of its respective spark plug.

    This part has been scratchbuilt, without any difficulty, in an appropriate diameter alu tube, 4 mm for mine, with 1.5 mm drill for the holes.
    To fix the loom, I've scratchbuilt two supports with my alu sheet: two thin (4 mm approximatively) U-shaped bands, fixed with a bolt on the engine head cover.
    Refer to diagram of cross section below:




    The aluminium loom has been polished and then painted with Alclad Chrome

    8/ Scratch-built aluminium spark plugs sockets

    I've replaced the uggly rubber spark plug covers by scratch-built sockets.
    They're made, for seven of the 8, from a small band of alu sheet shaped and drilled .5 mm, according to the following diagram.



    Result is correct, but very fragile..and one the 8 I've built has broken a few weeks later, when I was working on the engine nearby, so I made a new one, with another method, very much simpler and faster :


    - Take an alu tube of 2 mm external diameter, and at least 1 mm internal...
    - cut a 4mm section
    - flatten one end with a plier, over 2 mm
    - shape the flatten end to round it
    - drill it 1.5 mm on the flatten end
    - enter the ignition wire in the hole at the other end
    - flattent softly this end, to pinch the wire
    - that's all

    Result is correct too, but less than with the first method, in my opinion

    Each technic has benefits and limitations

    You can see now the differences between two technics:




    9/ Alu plates on the front panel of the engine and on the front of the parts n° 76691-692 (cooling pump of the supercharger ?)



    Does'nt need any explanation !


    10/ And others whose name and function I ignore !

    For instance this one , that is located on the middle of the curved top of engine front panel :



    I think it might be a control knob of the fan belt tension, but nothing is certain !

    I scratch-built it with brass M1 rod, brass 2 mm tube, alu sheet drilled disk and styrene Pocher Bugatti type 50 Coupé de Ville: à résurrection. 0.6 mm sheet

    That' s all for the engine as for now...




    Pocher Bugatti type 50 Coupé de Ville: à résurrection.
    Last edited by ThierryD86; 09-11-16 at 11:37 PM.
    QUOTE QUOTE #6

  6. Egon's Avatar Moderator
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    If you have any detailed reference fotos from a real car please post them in the gallery
    QUOTE QUOTE #7

  7. ThierryD86's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Hi Egon
    All I have comes from the Paul Koo's DVD and from the gallery section of This website.
    I think I have others but I cannot verify, because I'm actually on holidays in Canada and cannot access my PC.
    I'll check when back home.... However I don't think I would be authorized to share pictures that aren't free, due to copyright limitations?

    You should have a look too on this website of a French modeller: http://www.cg-models.com/moteur50.html


    Pocher Bugatti type 50 Coupé de Ville: à résurrection.
    Last edited by ThierryD86; 09-12-16 at 09:56 AM.
    QUOTE QUOTE #8

  8. sjordan's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Don't forget to check out the large historic photo archives at www.bugatti-trust.co.uk
    QUOTE QUOTE #9

  9. ThierryD86's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Quote Originally Posted by sjordan View Post
    Don't forget to check out the large historic photo archives at www.bugatti-trust.co.uk
    Done.... Very few new things for me after looking pics, but I could decide to cross the Channel to visit this Trust (sanctuary ?) and come back home with some drawings


    Pocher Bugatti type 50 Coupé de Ville: à résurrection.
    QUOTE QUOTE #10

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    Pocher Bugatti type 50 Coupé de Ville: à résurrection.
    As I am rather mad, I also wasted time to make a realistic radiator grill.

    I hated this ugly grill with its simulated holes...so, I undertook to drill them , all ....more than 4000 (four thousand) holes on the both sides, drilled to 0.8 mm...
    About 20 hours of fastidious job, over 2 weeks, and a dozen of drill bits broken.

    The result was amazing on the engine side, but less pleasant on the exterior side...so, I cut off the front drilled grill, to replace it by a photo-etched grill I found on Ebay (2000 wasted holes and many hours of lost work )






    I've replaced the kit's radiator cap by that one sold my MMC, silver plated Pocher Bugatti type 50 Coupé de Ville: à résurrection. .

    On the inside panel of this radiator, I've scratchbuilt the connector for the cable wich go through the engine compartment, (fixed on the cable holders of the engine right head cover), and then come through the firewall to join the dashboard.
    I think on the water temperature display.
    This connector has to be drilled on its center to let the cable come through later.

    Everything was a very long and fastidious work, but it was worth the effort.


    Pocher Bugatti type 50 Coupé de Ville: à résurrection.
    Last edited by ThierryD86; 09-12-16 at 09:31 PM.
    QUOTE QUOTE #11

  11. Egon's Avatar Moderator
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    That why it's so interesting to build Pocher cars, you make something and later you regret and make a new better one and a third one even better, I know all about it
    QUOTE QUOTE #12

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    Pocher Bugatti type 50 Coupé de Ville: à résurrection.
    And now, some pictures of the frame and axles, with extra details, and the engine mounted on it.
    This construction phase had already been completed when I introduced on this forum.

    A few overviews:





    ]
    ]


    Detailed views with changes and additions....stay tuned


    Pocher Bugatti type 50 Coupé de Ville: à résurrection.
    QUOTE QUOTE #13

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    Pocher Bugatti type 50 Coupé de Ville: à résurrection.
    Detailed fuel tank:
    The sides has been covered with styrene Pocher Bugatti type 50 Coupé de Ville: à résurrection. sheet to hide the separation gap between the two halves, then the tank has been primed and painted it Alclad Pocher Bugatti type 50 Coupé de Ville: à résurrection. White Aluminium.

    The kit's photo-etched thing that looks like an helix and is put on the tank has been replaced, in accordance with the reference photos, by a T "connector" scratchbuilt from brass tubes. On the real car, it seems to be a connector for two pipes, but after asking the question to an old car mechanic who had the opportunity to work on such vintage cars, this is probably a valve to enable or disable the outcome of gasoline.




    Additions have been made on the differential case:

    Some large hexagonal caps, up and down, in accordance with the references photos
    These caps has been scratchbuilt with hexagonal styrene rod.




    And on the top of the case, the cylindrical housing for the system which makes rotating the speed cable (sorry for this literal translation, I dont know the name ,of this mechanical apparatus)
    Later, this cable will be placed and connected to the dash speed display.

    This part has been scratchbuilt with styrene rod, brass tubes, alu sheet, and M1 brass bolt




    Front axle:

    I've over-detailed the leaf springs, adding 3 rebound clips on the anterior part of each (later, I noticed that I had mistaken, because there are 4 clips, but it was to late to change that, without disassembly the whole axle, and I was gutless)

    The clips were scratchbuilt , as always, with my precious and all purpose Alu sheet



    I've also added a cable holder on the arm of the exterior leaf of each shock absorber (dampers)
    These "grommets" have been scratchbuilt from M2 nuts included in the kit, which had been square-shaped, sanded and glued in place...

    These grommets served to guide the cabled which was used to adjust the amount of friction between the disks, and so adjust the amount of shock absorbing, depending of the road condition, to avoid car bouncing on damaged surfaces.
    The cables attached on the lever on the exterior disk of the damper








    This cables come from the dashboard, where two control knobs, one for the rear shock absorbers (on the left side of the dash), the other for the front (on the right side)
    These knobs are displayed on this picture...



    Dufaux et Repusseau can be read on them
    Dufaux et repusseau was an automotive supplier for brake and suspension systems. he applied for the patent of these teleadjustable dampers in 1930.
    Before, on the cars with dampers, as the Fiat Mefistofele for instance , you must adjust the tension using a five branches star located on the exterior disk of the shock absorber



    That's all for now.... Stay tuned and thanks for looking



    Pocher Bugatti type 50 Coupé de Ville: à résurrection.
    QUOTE QUOTE #14

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    Pocher Bugatti type 50 Coupé de Ville: à résurrection.
    Little flashback..... And little and pretentionless tutorial

    Concerning the engine-turning surfaces on the engine and the firewall.
    It's an tedious but very important work to do, in order to give life to this model, as for numerous cars of this time.
    I had noticed it on several big scale models of vintage cars, surfing on some websites, and have studied the method to get it, looking at Youtube videos made by guys who restore old cars.

    For our models, the idea is to apply engine-turning on a metallic Pocher Bugatti type 50 Coupé de Ville: à résurrection.
    sheet, and then to plate the part to cover with the exact shape, cutted in the metallic Pocher Bugatti type 50 Coupé de Ville: à résurrection. sheet.

    So, I own aluminium sheet of 0.3 mm thickness, provided by an orthopedic surgeon, friend of mine. These sheets protect in their boxes the prothesis he implants to his patients (really).
    I don't own a milling machine, neither a drill-press.... But I own too an Unimat Basic tool wich can be converted in lathe, drill-press, milling machine, sanding Pocher Bugatti type 50 Coupé de Ville: à résurrection. machine etc...This is almost a toy for me now, and inadequate for a precise job, but I have it. And have a lot of mini bits and tools for my Dremel Pocher Bugatti type 50 Coupé de Ville: à résurrection. , particularly metallic Pocher Bugatti type 50 Coupé de Ville: à résurrection. brushes of steel or brass, of 5 mm diameter.
    Theses brushes have been used to grab the surface of the aluminum sheet, to apply turned pattern on it.
    To prevent the diameter of the brush increasing during the rotation of the tool, I've surrounded the brush bristles with thin iron wire on the half higher of their length..
    On my Unimat, converted in a drill-press, I've installed a table that I can move with micrometric screws, in width and length.
    You put an Alu plate on the table, fix it with clamps...
    When you move down the mandrel, the brush grab a circular pattern on the alu sheet; then it's necessary to offset the table on the same rank lenghtwise to grab the next pattern and so on.
    At the end of the rank, you must offset the table crosswise, and you can go backward, pattern after pattern, and so on.
    After many tries, I found the good offsets to obtain the engine-turning you can see on the engine, and later on the firewall.


    On the pictures below, you can see my Unimat, the tools, the alu sheet and the results of my tries on a 12x12 cm alu plate.
    The pattern is approximatively correct lengthwise, but crosswise not.
    I havn't other unemployed patterned plate to show you.
    The plates were cutted at the good dimensions and glued in place with CA gel.
    I've used the same process to make the engine-turning on the engine side of the firewall, that you'll can see at the end of this reply.

    And I give you a link on the net:
    On Youtube, professionnal engine turning of a modeller:


    Enjoy












    These last pictures show you two of my tries that have not been used on the model, because the offsets were bad
    It's just to explain you the principle.




    Pocher Bugatti type 50 Coupé de Ville: à résurrection.
    Last edited by ThierryD86; 09-15-16 at 02:00 PM.
    QUOTE QUOTE #15

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