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    1. Kit: Pocher Bugatti type 50 Coupé de Ville, by (Yearly Subscriber) ThierryD86 is online now
      Builder Last Online: Feb 2019 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/8 Rating:  (1 votes - 5.00 average) Thanks: 6
      Started: 09-10-16 Build Revisions: Never  
      Supported Includes Transkit Restoration Attribution
      Build in Progress



      Hello

      As I said in my introduction on this forum, 26 years have passed since I've begun the assembly of this precious and rare model, and 24 since I abandonned it on the shelf, gathering dust and rust.
      Recently, I woke up, and decided to re-start it, and, if possible, achieve it.
      I disassembled entirely the model and began this resurrection !


      Actually, "she" is in this state:
      - Chassis with frame rails, brakes, fuel tank, rear and front axle assembled
      - engine with many extra details ( according to the reference photos of Paul Koo's DVD and other found on the net, particularly on gallery section of Tthis website), mounted on the chassis with B002 Engine mount of MCM (Thanks Marvin )
      - Steering box installed with personal and extra detailing.
      - Engine mounted on the frame.
      - Extra detailed firewall achieved and mounted
      - Radiator with some improvements mounted too

      I've added or am going to doit, numerous parts or advanced features as:
      - Speedometer cable
      - Tachometer cable
      - Functional linkage of accelerator Pocher Bugatti type 50 Coupé de Ville: à résurrection.
      working on carburetors and supercharger
      And many others...


      As much as possible, I used bolts instead of screws, and, where not, I painted the screws in black, to hide them.
      The chassis was painted with automotive black primer Pocher Bugatti type 50 Coupé de Ville: à résurrection. , which gave it a softly grained aspect.
      For all the engine parts, I used Alclad Pocher Bugatti type 50 Coupé de Ville: à résurrection. metal paints with my airbrush Pocher Bugatti type 50 Coupé de Ville: à résurrection. , and here and there, tamiya Pocher Bugatti type 50 Coupé de Ville: à résurrection. paints with a soft or a dry brush.
      Many details are scratched with aluminium sheet (0.3 mm thickness), Styrène sheet and rods, brass or copper or alu tubes and rods (from 0.3 mm to 2 mm) , micro bolts and threaded rod, micro washers, destroyed watch parts or photo-etched parts(engine cam covers, photo-etched grill for the radiator), thanks to Ebay
      Several parts have been modified when necessary, especially to make them closer to the real ones.


      And now, some overviews of the model, in its actual state....more detailed photos of the step by step building to go later if anybody is interested


















      Ps: I didn't found the way to put an explicit picture of my building before the title of the thread.. So, if anyone could help me...


      Pocher Bugatti type 50 Coupé de Ville: à résurrection.

      Build Photos

      Pocher Bugatti type 50 Coupé de Ville: à résurrection.-chargement-jpg  Pocher Bugatti type 50 Coupé de Ville: à résurrection.-k84-jpg 


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  1. PROPELLER's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Dan
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    I totally agree with Egon and Roger...
    Once the drilling done, forget the mill! Files, sweat and time will be your friends!

    Dan.
    QUOTE QUOTE #407

  2. ThierryD86's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Thierry
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    You're probably right saying that.....But, my first attempt of this lever has been made quite entirely on the milling machine, and hasn't broken.

    Why ?
    I do think that for this first attempt, the finest end of the lever was situated on the free end of my brass bar, and the thickest (and so, the strongest) one in the middle of the bar.
    For my second attempt, I've incorrectly reversed the lever's matrix , and the finest end of the lever (so, the weakest ) became situated in the middle of the bar...the vibrations induced on the lever while milling have probably provoked the fracture....

    Well, third attempt tomorrow.....If it breaks another time, I'll think to try the filing method

    Thanks guys for your help and c omments


    Pocher Bugatti type 50 Coupé de Ville: à résurrection.
    QUOTE QUOTE #408

  3. ThierryD86's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Thierry
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    Well guys
    This third attempt of the brake lever has been entirely rough shaped and then refined on the milling machine.
    I've used the files only for rounding off sharp edges of top part of the lever:



    

    Once separated from the rod, I got this part, on which a lot of work remains to do:



    Essentially to round off the bottom of the lever, and then polish I before making a second one, and nickel plating them

    Stay tuned if you like and thanks for watching



    Pocher Bugatti type 50 Coupé de Ville: à résurrection.
    QUOTE QUOTE #409

  4. ThierryD86's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Thierry
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    The best is the enemy of good

    I was rounding off the bottom of the lever on the milling machine, when suddenly, the tiny bit , quite achieved, said bye bye to the pin on which I had fixed it and has flown somewhere in my workshop
    It has been impossible to find it after 1 hour in kneeled position on the floor





    Fortunately, tonight, I've found my lever on the floor, enlightening it in the dark

    Here it is; it remains a little bit of work on the milling machine to decrease the thickness at the bottom, and then filing and polishing it:



    Stay tuned if you like




    Pocher Bugatti type 50 Coupé de Ville: à résurrection.
    QUOTE QUOTE #410

  5. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    don
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    Kit
    Pocher Bugatti type 50 Coupé de Ville
    Thierry,

    I am very glad you found that part! It looks like you had taken a lot of care in making it.

    Your work is always nice, and loosing a part every now and then is something we all experience! -and it was for a very short time very exciting I'm sure!

    Then of course one hour on your knees! (I have gone longer, only to find the part somehow got into a pocket!!)

    Thank you for all that you have shown, and shared!

    -Don
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #411

  6. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger
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    Sounds familiar to me! Your incident was programmed: while turning, the cutting tool has a tendency to lift the part. I never machine such details, only by hand with a file.
    QUOTE QUOTE #412

  7. ThierryD86's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Thierry
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    Well Roger, now you can see that it's possible !
    Probably it's not the better nor easier way to make this kind of job, but I wanted to experiment a method and see if I was able to succeed.
    Now I know !
    I've a second front lever to machine.
    And hopefully, my mishaps with the first one will help me to do the job quicker, safer and better....

    For the rear brake levers, it will be another challenge, because, as we can see on reference pictures and looking at the amazing work of PROPELLER, they have a "S" shape


    Pocher Bugatti type 50 Coupé de Ville: à résurrection.
    QUOTE QUOTE #413

  8. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger
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    In that situation, I would turn a tool with an head (like a screw, without thread) and clamp it into the chuck. That way, it cannot fly away. In your picture, the lever is too far away from the chuck, you have a lack of rigidity; the part to be worked on should be as near as possible from the chuck.
    QUOTE QUOTE #414

  9. ThierryD86's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Thierry
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Zimmermann View Post
    In that situation, I would turn a tool with an head (like a screw, without thread) and clamp it into the chuck. That way, it cannot fly away. In your picture, the lever is too far away from the chuck, you have a lack of rigidity; the part to be worked on should be as near as possible from the chuck.
    Excellent advice, Roger, Thanks a lot


    Pocher Bugatti type 50 Coupé de Ville: à résurrection.
    QUOTE QUOTE #415

  10. ThierryD86's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Thierry
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    Here is the lever quite achieved (remains to opening the upper "eye", polishing and nickel plating), with its bolt, washer and nut:



    Stay tuned if you like and thanks for watching



    Pocher Bugatti type 50 Coupé de Ville: à résurrection.
    QUOTE QUOTE #416

  11. ThierryD86's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Thierry
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    Hi chaps and gentlemen...
    There will be a little break for this construction, because I'm on holidays since half an hour, and I leave France for Canada tomorrow evening, for three weeks.
    See you soon.


    Pocher Bugatti type 50 Coupé de Ville: à résurrection.
    QUOTE QUOTE #417

  12. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    don
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    Pocher Bugatti type 50 Coupé de Ville
    ​Have a Great Vacation!
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #418

  13. ThierryD86's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Thierry
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    Hi gentlemen !

    Well..back home 10 days ago, and had no time to work on my Lady Bug, because a lot of work at my office.

    During the following weeks, I'll try to work on her from time to time, particularly making my second front brake lever, and then the rear ones.

    However, I took advantage of my free time during my - quite - four weeks of holidays in Canada, thinking about how converting my milling machine (a little Proxxon MF70) in a CNC milling machine.

    And finally, I did succeed in getting a CNC working one, without the need to buy an already-built solution as the "Go-CNC", and saving at least 250 euros.

    Hereunder are pictures of my modified Proxxon, and a (very bad) sample of what we can get with such a tool





    Now, I'll be able to machine complex parts, with curves and circles or engraved letters, and to machine parts in several identical copies

    And I've a head full of ideas...

    Stay tuned if you like


    Pocher Bugatti type 50 Coupé de Ville: à résurrection.
    QUOTE QUOTE #419

  14. Egon's Avatar Moderator
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    egon
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    Cool machine, give it a try on these letters on the plates in brass, the lower one is 15mm wide.
    Attached Images Attached Images Pocher Bugatti type 50 Coupé de Ville: à résurrection.-plader-jpg 
    QUOTE QUOTE #420

  15. ThierryD86's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Thierry
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    Hi gentlemen

    For those who are interested, I'm posting a topic about my recent job.
    It's not modeling, but it will help to...

    You now that I've converted my micro - milling machine Proxxon MF70 in a CNC one.
    At the moment, I have motorized 3 axis: X, Y, Z.
    An Arduino board drives actually 3 motor drivers A4988 implanted on a CNC shield.
    My motors are NEMA 23, 24V, 1A each, and the minimal rotation angle is 1.8 degrees. 200 steps make 1 revolution, and move each axis of the milling machine of 1 mm.....So, the precision of this system is - theoretically of course - of 5 microns.



    My vectorial drawings are made with Inkscape, and are 2D or 2,5D, but I've a full licence for Fusion 360, and I've purchased on Ebay America a RINO rotary motorized gearbox...
    So, it remains to adapt on it a 3 or 4 jaws chuck, and learn how to drive the 4 axis with Mach 3, for instance.

    At the moment, my drawings are converted in CAM projects by ESTLCAM V11. This software manages too the G-Code conversion and send it to the Arduino Uno control board.

    When I've installed all the wiring, the power supply, USB cable etc, my workbench looked a bit messy, and it was impossible to use my CNC toy without cleaning it.



    So, I've organized this merry mess, storing the wirings in corrugated tubing between motors and CNC shield.
    I began then to see my world more clearly !
    Hum, in a way of speaking:





    So, then, I've started the construction of an electronic housing for the Arduino, CNC shield, various plugs (USB, power supply, wiring cable entries etc), and a fan.
    I've planned to install an Emergency Stop button, on the top of the case.

    I decided to make the box with 3mm MDF, because I had it in my stash, and hadn't black plexiglas (I would have preferred this material)

    So, I drew up the plans of 6 faces/panels and for feet, with Inkscape, exported them as .dxf files.
    The panels were cut with a Proxxon table circular saw, and then, all the apertures in each panel were cuted on my CNC milling machine, using my six dxf files via Estlcam.

    It has been a real pleasure to mill, some 52 identical slots on front and side panels, perfectly regularly spaced, and some 66 5 mm diameter round holes on the top and bottom faces, including the other cuts, rectangles or circles.

    The case's dimensions are 60 mm tall (without feet), 100 mm wide and 126 mm long.

    Some panels :



    During assembly:



    Panel have received a grey filler (Alclad) coat, and the fan has been placed:



    To prevent insubordinate fingers to meet the fan, a grill has been installed between the fan and the read panel. For the curious, I've used mosquito netting



    Following of the assembly

    :


    How it will look when finished:




    It remains a lot of hours to spend on this project:

    - I'm waiting for final paint: Tamiya Pocher Bugatti type 50 Coupé de Ville: à résurrection.
    Green olive drab, that I'll use for the final color (it looks like the Proxxon color), 2 or 3 coats
    - Lettering yellow: "CNC Controller"
    - Final coating with Alclad Pocher Bugatti type 50 Coupé de Ville: à résurrection. semi-gloss, 2 coats
    - And all the final wiring for On/Off with green indicator light, Emergency stop, Fan etc
    - Testing, and then install ballast weight under the case, if possible,
    - Furthermore, I'm waiting for a zeroing touch plate that I ordered in China for less than nothing, Its wiring will take place into the tiny hole pin the left of USB plugging, on front panel.

    Well, I've been very chatty this evening, thanks for watching, and stay tuned if you like.




    Pocher Bugatti type 50 Coupé de Ville: à résurrection.
    QUOTE QUOTE #421

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