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    1. Kit: , by (VIP/Sponsor) xken is offline
      Builder Last Online: Nov 2022 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/8 Rating:  (1 votes - 5.00 average) Thanks: 2
      Started: 02-15-09 Build Revisions: Never  
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      This build will be intended to aquaint those interested in working with brass. I will also keep it simple so as no sophisticated equipment is required. Everything will be hand built with hand tools. So of course if you have equipment you can build quicker. This will be a 1/8th scale Model T racer when completed. I have a picture posted in another thread. And I will find tune as I post.


      Brass Model T Tutorial by XKen

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      Brass Model T Tutorial by XKen-model_t_finished_car_15-jpg 


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  1. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Kenneth
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    Thank you for your kindness and of course I will reimbuse you for any expenses.

    I have this unit and it works very well for small items, unfortunately in all my years I have not seen these for sale very often. I had to breakdown and buy one a couple of years ago. However, for some jobs that require a sensitive touch I do by hand, saves breaking drill bits and is faster in the long run. Plastic guys could use this with a drill press instead of a milling machine. It lays flat or stands on one edge.

    ROTARY TABLE

    Ken


    Brass Model T Tutorial by XKen
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  2. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    This came to me in the middle of the night, so I set this up for Tage and others interested in wood turning spokes. Amazing how one's brain keeps working when you are asleep.

    Here I am using a 11/32" 6 point socket in which a 1/4" piece of wood indexes into perfectly. I cut a piece of square stock and inserted down the socket end to set the depth for the blank. Now the socket will drive the blank and is a quick change and be the same for every setup. This principle can work for various sizes of stock.

    When I get to doing the spokes I will just now need to cut the steel profile cutter; but that will be down the proverbial road.



    Ken


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  3. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Here is the first differential half being milled. My intent is not to teach machineing other than to show the process. I am self taught so it would be like the blind leading the blind.

    Javier here is a great example of using the rotary table. This is one I pickup from Harbor Freight on sale. I am sucker for tools on sale, got the other one from MicroMark on sale as well.

    Asuming you have a lathe and no mill; cut the shoulder off and just file in the location with a small needle file. I will be dressing the cut edges with files.



    Ken


    Brass Model T Tutorial by XKen
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  4. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Here is a picture of how I transfer recess locations from on half to the other and assuring that they line up when complete. The larger gap is where the driveshaft will attach.



    Here are the trimmed halves after being soldered together ready for the bolt flanges. Flanges normally could have been machined in; but I could not easily fine a 1 3/4" diameter piece of bar stock so this is a work around solution.



    Ken


    Brass Model T Tutorial by XKen
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  5. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Here they are bolted together for the first time. Now on to the wheel hubs and drive shaft attachment on the front of the differential. I just set the chassis on it for a feel; springs will still need adjustment once the wheel hubs are made.



    Here is a closeup of the detail.



    Mario, thank you for your kind words. Dan, here is a challenge in symetry, I even did my best to get the rivets to line up.

    Ken


    Brass Model T Tutorial by XKen
    #36

  6. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Here is the start of the wheel hubs and brake assembly.







    Had a little time today to get some work done. I am still toying with the idea of working brakes if I can find enough details.

    Ken


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  7. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    I had 2 1/2 hours in the waiting room this morning while my wife had catarct surgery and was able to piece together how the brakes look and work; so I am going to have functional rear brakes on this build.

    Here is the brake plate after being soldered to end of axle. In operation I had to use the torch due to the thickness of the axle end. The two large bolts are where the trailing arm attaches.



    Here is one side done and working cam. Cam was hand filed to shape.



    Here is the first step in turning the brake shoe cam. Note using point to locate and hold end in place while cutting. This is like using a live center except when getting small the live center is to big. I have tuened pieces down as thin as 1/32" using this technique. Also use cutting fluid on the cutter and point as lubricant.




    Here is the cam shape being cut off. Made in one piece for strength.




    Now to finish up the other half.

    Ken


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  8. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    The Model T service manual clearly shows the brakes as internal to the wheel drum; but in looking at this picture the brakes also appear on the outside of the drum. Is this setup what is refered to the "Rocky Montain brake" and works in tandem with the internal (standard) set up as well? For example, expanding on the inside and contacting on the outside at the same time. I have looked at picture of the Rocky Mountain Brake system and it does not look like this either. Perhaps this is a homemade setup????



    By the time I am finished with this build I think I will be qualified to restore a Model T.


    Ken


    Brass Model T Tutorial by XKen
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  9. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Where have you been hiding all this automotive genius for so long?
    I have not been hiding it, I have had a lifelong interest in cars and have rebuilt and restored the following over the years: VW kit car for my wife, 1919 490 Chevrolet Touring, 1963 Thunderbird, 1986 Porsche 944 Turbo, 1977 911 Porsche Targa, 1962 Jaguar XKE OTS my current toy. Here is a picture of it a consistant 99.97 point car at Jaguar Concours. This car was restored from a rusted out hulk with holes large enough to put your leg through. However, it was complete, original and had been disassembled for 10 years when I bought it in 1979 for $1,100. Here I was at a Vintage Race weekend at mid-Ohio, Saturday I took Best Jaguar and Sunday all marques competed and I got Best of Show.



    Here is the engine compartment, I have been told by judges that I will never have a 100 point car because I drive it too much. Oh well, I never was much of a trophy hound anyway. Cars are to be driven and enjoyed, not admired in a garage.



    I just have never built a model car before other than the 1/24 plastic ones when I was a kid. So this Model T is my first attempt at scratch building a 1/8th scale model car. Whether a full size car or model, God is still in the details.

    Ken


    Brass Model T Tutorial by XKen
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  10. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    1. Make parts or assembly. Hand fabricated or machine.

    2. If soldering together use Staybrite solder and flux.

    2. Clean off excess solder by scrapeing,(back edge of xacto blade), file or sandpaper. If part is made in lathe some sanding Brass Model T Tutorial by XKen and polishing can be done before cutting part off. Axle halves were done this way.

    3. Brush parts with steel parts brush about the size of a large tooth brush.

    4. Brush parts with brass parts brush about the size of a large tooth brush.

    5. Buff using ""course" to "fine" Scotchbrite pads.

    6. Go to a sink, turn on the water (warm) take an ordinary toothbrush, put a drop of dish detergent on it and scrub part; then with wet tooth brush dip into a small bowl of pumice and brush vigorously until part is satisfactory.(NOTE of Caution here. Run water into a large bowl and work over bowl in case you scrub the tiny part out of you grip; it will fall in the bowl instead of going down the drain). This is where the Staybrite solder comes into play because it tends to blend nicely with the brass. Powered pumice is available at jewelry suppply houses like OttoFrei. (Google them) Here is a link http://www.ottofrei.com/store/produc...4&cat=0&page=2 this is the fine mesh they also have a couple of more meshes.

    7. Big parts can be buffed using a buffing wheel and rouge red to white; smaller parts with a dremel buffing wheel and rouge.

    8. (Optional) spray with clear laquer, or dip into Jax Instant Brass Cleaner; link http://www.jaxchemical.com/jaxshop/shopexd.asp?id=93 which can slow down the tarnishing for awhile. So far on this thread #7 and 8 have not been done.

    This is the process in a nutshell. The real trick is to use as little solder as possible and still get a good strong joint.

    Ken


    Brass Model T Tutorial by XKen
    #41

  11. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Here is a build sequence for the emergency brakes that will work off the handbrake.

    The inner section was cut out of 1/32" brass sheet first; then the outside cut and filed to correct demension. The layout was done with dividers to scratch circles; hole centers were located using a sharp point and the hand started and then finished up on drill press.


    Here I added the washers for strength and the outboard side will have an angle cut to the center of the washers to provide spring action. Then locate shoe up against washer.





    Here is where a really hot Brass Model T Tutorial by XKen iron with a puddle of solder on it functions; you kind of carefully pour the liquid solder onto the joint while holding the strip in place and if you are hot Brass Model T Tutorial by XKen enough the solder flows instantly across the tight joint. Guys this takes a little practice to learn "the touch", so be patient with yourselves.


    The springs were formed around a drill bit end held in vise and the work hardening by wrapping provided the brass with enough spring action to work. The spring wire is .020 brass rod not wire, rod is harder. The hole still there in the upper right is the location for the rear spring hanger.




    Now to make the other side.

    Ken


    Brass Model T Tutorial by XKen
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  12. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    No brake work last night, based on OBH's feedback visited a hobby store in Strongsville, Ohio (1 hour from where I live) and found this gear set that was the closest to having the potential to work. Unfortunetly the spider gear was too large to fit in. Now back to the brakes. Thanks OBH for the heads up.



    Ken


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  13. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Here is a close up of the finished working brakes. I changed out the springs with .010" rod instead of the .020" rod that I first used. The .020" just did not look right.



    Here is an overall look of the axle with the brakes in place.



    Don,

    The spider gear assembly would have to be half the size of the one I got to fit inside the housing. Trust me if there was a way of shoe horning it in I would have.

    Dan, if all goes well with the engine build the pistons will go up and down too when the crank is turned on the front of the engine, not only the rear wheels. I have been eyeballing the engine pictures kind of building it in my mind first. Maybe if I can pull it off there might be some interest in reproducing it; will have to see when I get that far.

    Now to build the rear spring hanger attachment that goes in the top hole of the brake plate.

    Ken


    Brass Model T Tutorial by XKen
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  14. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Here is the rear axle attached for the first time. Now to fine tune and cleanup a couple of solder joints when it come apart to cut in the driveshaft opening in the housing and fit the gears. Don't you just love it when a plan comes together.



    Here is a closeup, here you can see the hanger solder joint needs a little work. The real challenge which you cannot see was the inside reinforcement angles that stradle the hanger arm. Just time consuming fussing with tine peices.



    Will now have to take a part to move on. The stands are just temporary to take the photo. They may end up becoming the wheels for the quick lift jack.

    Ken


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  15. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Here is a tricky operation. We have two axle halves bolted together and we want to solder the front bolt face to them that first have to be hand fitted, then cut in half and each piece soldered to its respective axle without soldering them or the axles together.



    Here is a close up of the alignment piece that the drive shaft bearing housing will eventually bolt to.




    Here is a close up, solder like tight joints. Hand fitting these takes patience and remember you are filing to fit a compund curve. Also note the hole will become an oval due to saw blade, will need to be redrilled later back to round.



    Here is the secret to not having assemblies or parts being soldered together. Yellow ochre powder mixed with touch water painted on the surfaces not to be soldered. In effect you are painting on dirt to muddy up the surfaces.



    Here is the solder joint completed. As I have mentioned earlier they can look pretty ugly at times. Here I am using 50/50 solder that melts and flows at a lower tempurature than StayBrite solder; do not want to chance remelting existing joints. Once intial solder is done let unit cool down a little and then just puddle up the joint by adding solder to help built a little transition radii around both sides.



    Finished and clean up ready for next operation, the bearing housing that will bolt to the flat front surface just added. The drive shaft will pass through the hole with the pinion gear inside.




    Ken


    Brass Model T Tutorial by XKen
    #46

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