Close

Page 2 of 28 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ... LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 411
    1. Kit: , by (VIP/Sponsor) xken is offline
      Builder Last Online: Nov 2022 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/8 Rating:  (1 votes - 5.00 average) Thanks: 2
      Started: 02-15-09 Build Revisions: Never  
      Not Supported

      This build will be intended to aquaint those interested in working with brass. I will also keep it simple so as no sophisticated equipment is required. Everything will be hand built with hand tools. So of course if you have equipment you can build quicker. This will be a 1/8th scale Model T racer when completed. I have a picture posted in another thread. And I will find tune as I post.


      Brass Model T Tutorial by XKen

      Build Photos

      Brass Model T Tutorial by XKen-model_t_finished_car_15-jpg 


      Show Complete First Post

      Show Your Support

      • This build may not be copied, reproduced or published elsewhere without author's permission.
        Please note: The first post will be displayed at the top of every page.

  1. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Kenneth
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    2,405
    You know one of the hardest things I run into is symmetry. Getting the camber the same on both sides or getting the bend into a spring the same on each side.
    That is why I have learned to stack Identical parts after being rough cut and then finish file as needed all together. Having identical parts to begin with reduces tremendously the margin for error. That is how I did the axle ends.

    As for springs that is just fine tuning and tweaking with ever so slight adjustments. The first time I did these I must have had them on and off half a dozen times due to the the clamping force of the center clamps once tightened up. Some times it just takes a great deal of fussing and patience. Also there are times it is just best to walk away and do something else for a while. I gave up being the absolute perfectionist years ago; it is all about enjoying what you are doing and learning for the next time.

    Ken


    Brass Model T Tutorial by XKen
    #17

  2. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Kenneth
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    2,405
    . Here is a link for those who may want to order one. In checking around others have indicated that I would best to start with this one first.


    Texas T Parts: Model T Ford Service

    Keeping my fingers crossed and hope it has good images.

    Ken;';;';


    Brass Model T Tutorial by XKen
    Last edited by hot ford coupe; 02-02-10 at 09:31 PM.
    #18

  3. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Kenneth
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    2,405
    Dan inquired about whether or not to make the rearend work. Here is a great little tutorial for all you gear heads who want to sink your teeth into cutting gears.

    Tip 27--Cutting bevel gears

    Enjoy! This is a good one. Grab a favorite beverage and study it.

    Ken


    Brass Model T Tutorial by XKen
    #19

  4. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Kenneth
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    2,405
    Yes I would really appreciate a set of pictures and drawings. You should post them in the gallery to share with others.

    I plan to use wood for the wheels; in fact there is a sample in the "Off Topic" Thread of this site under Model T site. Here is a picture of the spoke.



    I understand the photo etch process and have used Tom's Model Works parts in the past. Unfortunately he passed away last week. I will probably use aluminum for the body.

    Your English is very good and the explaination I am sure will be useful for others to learn.

    I will let you know how the Model T bible is when it arrives.

    Ken :)'


    Brass Model T Tutorial by XKen
    #20

  5. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Kenneth
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    2,405
    Here is a great way to build small parts and assemblies. Kind of a stick building technique where the last thing you do after you have soldered everything is to cut it off the stick. The stick (a rod, or strip) provides a working handle.



    As one reads through this build I will from time to time mention a mechanical interface or connection between parts to be soldered. This is especially critical with tiny parts and assemblies. Here the yoke will will have to sustain the pressure of the drag rod when turning the wheels; so on these kind of parts I try and have a threaded connection to one hold in place while soldering and two provide the strength needed. Solder joints can break at times under pressure or extreme force.



    If you plan to work with brass and nuts, bolts and threaded rod yellow ochre is a must. This powder when mixed with water creates a paste that solder will not flow to under heat of the soldering operation. If you do not use it and use to much solder the solder will flow right up the threads. Once cool it cleans right off by chasing it with a nut or bolt.






    Before cutting off strip cut through the end of the yoke tube and collar to represent the clamp opening and then just kiss cut across the bolt tube for the detail line of the clamp.

    Then cut off of strip and round the ends of the yoke where the connecting bolt goes through.





    Here is the finished yoke connected up. Now to build the next one. This is a great technique for making very samll parts and not burning your fingers or not being able to hold the part while you build it.





    Ken


    Brass Model T Tutorial by XKen
    #21

  6. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Kenneth
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    2,405
    Another little part that required some fussing.







    Here is the finished front end linkage. I will spare Dan the video;
    so you will have to trust me that it really works.



    Ken


    Brass Model T Tutorial by XKen
    #22

  7. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Kenneth
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    2,405
    Here is an overall view of chassis components to date (3/7/09). All the steering linkage works. I contacted the people at Hawk and still no date on the introduction of the 1/6th scale Model T 1927 engine.

    Now on to the rear end which will be more of a challenge. Still have not received the Model T "Bible" from Texas, they must have put on a mule heading north.




    Everyone have a great day modelling!

    Ken


    Brass Model T Tutorial by XKen
    #23

  8. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Kenneth
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    2,405
    I use 0000; 000; 00; 0; #1 and #2 sizes. The 0000's are for really fine work and I use candle wax or beeswax as a lubricant. The 0000's would be really good for cutting plastic. I bought a bulk pack with all these sizes in it a few years back from a local Hobby store going out of business; the counter person did not know what they were and sold me the entire pouch fo $3.

    I tried to find them online but could only find packs of 12 by size at MicroMark.

    Hope this helps. Use the lubricant often keeps the tiny teeth from guming up.

    Ken


    Brass Model T Tutorial by XKen
    #24

  9. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Kenneth
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    2,405
    Here is the first half of the differential. The shoulder is there to be able to hold the piece in the lathe to core out the inside; then the shoulder will be cut off.



    The other side cored out.



    The two parts press fitted together, eventually will be soldered.



    These are the parts that you need a lathe to make. The axle shaft had to be bored with a 5/32" drill from each end.

    Ken


    Brass Model T Tutorial by XKen
    #25

  10. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Kenneth
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    2,405
    Lubrication is the real trick when working with jeweller's saws; as amoung other things. The wax keeps the teeth from guming up. Also a drop of cutting fluid down the blade now and then does not hurt.

    The lathe cutting was all done slowly freehand just using a small gouge cutter I ground myself. By no means am I a machinist. I am self taught; therefore dangerous to myself, also being able to read helps and my learning curve is not a circle.

    I get real close with the gouge tool and then do the final dressing with a half round file; just stay away from the head of the lathe or you will hurt something and pay attention to what you are doing. It is kind of like target fixation; you get so focused on the part you tend to forget what is happening around you. When doing this with a file sprinkle talcum powder on the file and that will help release the brass filings in the teeth and use a file card to clean. To sharpen a course file lay it in a glass tray with some battery acid and check every 30 minutes; you can tell just by the feel of the teeth with your finger. Rinse clean with water; dry very well and hit with some WD-40 to stop the rusting. If you try this with a real fine tooth file it can eat off the teeth. When working with brass you can never have enough files and they can be pricey too.

    As for the brass I get most from K&S Brass Model T Tutorial by XKen or the local recycling yard for the big stuff like the 1 1/2" bar that the differential is turned out off. Soft brass is harder to machine. Most stuff is what is refered to as half-hard. And don't go there!

    Hope this helps. Ken


    Brass Model T Tutorial by XKen
    #26

  11. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Kenneth
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    2,405
    Lots of honey-do's to get done after work yesterday; but did manage to get the second differential half made, and then thinned up both for final detailing. Need to mill slots and drill bolt holes on both. The shoulder is still on for fixtureing purposes for milling. The shoulder will be the last thing cut off of the halves. But first need to do the other axle as well. This picture shows more of a side view of the axle. Once I have the second axle to this point I will then do the final trueing and clean up to both at the same time. The parallel surfaces towards the narrow end on the right is where the wheel hub will slip on.



    Nortley I like the chaulk idea, one thing with the talc is that after acid sharpening the files are more prone to rusting and the talc absorbs moisture to. I wonder if the chaulk will do that as well. With the chaulk you could even color code the files.

    Ken


    Brass Model T Tutorial by XKen
    #27

  12. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Kenneth
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    2,405
    Here is a picture you may have seen already of the test one I did. That is why I made extra blanks to doing a little experimenting like you have described. I cut out poplar because the test piece I made first was using bass wood which kind of shreded rather than cut when turning. I will also make a brass pattern to cut the angles with a sharp xacto knife.



    Earlier in this thread there is a great link one the building of a real wheel which is in essence the same way I will proceed, except I have to make the parts first. I will try and find and post later. Here is the link that is on page one of this thread. It is a slide show and the picture changes every 10 seconds.

    http://www.modelt.org/regans_wheels_web/

    Here is the test spoke trimmed and wood rim. I think I will have to do a liminate for the rim to get the required strength in it. I am concerned that the rim if made from one piece will split with the grain over time under the weight of the car.


    No I have not heard back yet from Javier; but my Model T "bible" is to be delivered either today or tomorrow by UPS. My wife has eye surgery Monday morning and they said to plan on a 3-4 hour wait; so bring a good book. Guess what I will be reading.

    Ken


    Brass Model T Tutorial by XKen
    #28

  13. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Kenneth
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    2,405
    I was planning to trap the center with the brass hubs and use brass bolts and nuts to hold them together. The bolt heads will be turned round like the original carriage bolts were. I can easily put a 1/64th plywood disc front and back under the hubs. I have plenty of 1/64th and 1/32 plywood for my plane building.

    Good heads up! Ken


    Brass Model T Tutorial by XKen
    #29

  14. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Kenneth
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    2,405
    Here is the second axle half done and both cleaned up ready to mill for bolts on the differential halves, locate and add rivets on axle end to the differential.

    Then the axle and differential half will be soldered to each other. Then the center flanges will be fabricated using 1/32" sheet stock pinned and soldered in place. I could no find a piece of bar stock 1 3/4" diameter otherwise they would have been cut in on the lathe. Just a work around to solve the problem. Then at some point the hole will be cut in for the drive shaft; once my service manual arrives. Did not come today.



    Ken


    Brass Model T Tutorial by XKen
    #30

  15. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Kenneth
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    2,405
    Here is a picture showing the riveting process. First I layed out a pattern on card stock with 30 degree segments and then set the part in the center and transferred to location using a .5 mechanical pencil. Then marked each location with a scribe point and then carefully drilled by hand the holes at required angle for heads to lay flat. After all the holes were drilled I carefully inserted the rivets without bending the shafts with needle nose pliars. Then with the big iron soldered soldered from the backside to keep the front as clean as possible. Trimmed shafts off with cutters and filed smooth.



    The Model T book arrived today. It is a reproduction of an original with some pictures too dark to make out details; some others are good enough. I will be taken Javier up on his offer if the books he has are not reproductions as well. Anyway there is enough to keep going.

    Ken


    Brass Model T Tutorial by XKen
    #31

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Quick Scale Calculator

 
Scale Calculator   Scale Factor   Real Size:     + Deluxe Scale Calculator
  1: th   Which equals Convert measurement: Reset or clear:  
  Any Scale   Scale Size:     + Deluxe Metric Calculator
 
Top