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    1. Kit: , by (VIP/Sponsor) Old Busted Hotness is offline
      Builder Last Online: Jun 2019 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/8 Rating:  Thanks: 0
      Started: 07-27-06 Build Revisions: Never  
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      This is gonna be a fairly short tutorial. The Deuce Barn Baby was weathered with a simple technique known as washing.



      Start with a flat black base coat Barn Baby weathering- it's dead easy! . Washes Barn Baby weathering- it's dead easy! stick best to a matte surface, they tend to roll off a glossy finish. I used Tamiya Barn Baby weathering- it's dead easy! acrylics Barn Baby weathering- it's dead easy! , flat brown, flat red and red brown, with some flat black and a few grays, diluted heavily with water.

      Start with a fresh palette and a wide brush. Dip the brush into the paint, then onto the palette. Dip the brush into water, as if you're going to clean it, then go back to the palette. Three or four loads of water should be enough to create a suitably thin wash. Then go to town on the body, being careful NOT to apply it evenly. You want it splotchy and uneven. Do the whole body, frame, etc in brown, then wait for it to dry. Then go back and do it over, this time in red. A few splotches of red-brown, dripped into the wash while it's still good & wet, will give a nice extra splash of rust where you want it.

      Brake drums, backing plates, exhaust pipes and other highly-rusted areas I just painted with red-brown, with a few red highlights, then treated to a black wash to bring out the details.

      Mix some fine sand Barn Baby weathering- it's dead easy! with the red-brown if you want really heavy rust, like on the headers and pipes. Tamiya Barn Baby weathering- it's dead easy! clear blue and clear yellow adds some heat-treating to the chrome pipes, since the real ones never stay chrome for very long.

      Tamiya Barn Baby weathering- it's dead easy! smoke works well for dulling headlight reflectors. Those of you with long memories will recall sealed-beam headlights that went dark with age, and Tamiya Barn Baby weathering- it's dead easy! smoke on the reflectors simulates this perfectly. Smoke mixed with brown makes a realistic oil leak.

      That's about it. Told you it was easy :)

      Oh, the voltage regulator was cut from the chrome firewall, and wired with Detail Master Barn Baby weathering- it's dead easy! 1/24 scale spark plug wires.
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  1. Don Garrett's Avatar Asst. Administrator
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    Don
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    Thanks a million for the tips hotness...hope you're planning on sticking around for awhile.:)
    Grandpa McGurk.....Steppin' Large and Livin' easy.
    TDRinnovations.com
    QUOTE QUOTE #2

  2. Old Busted Hotness's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Stu
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    Oh, I'll be in & out. If y'all aren't opposed to RC projects, I'll post up a couple of mine that may be worthy.


    Barn Baby weathering- it's dead easy!
    This don't look like no expressway to me! - Jake Blues
    QUOTE QUOTE #3

  3. ScaleMotorcars's Avatar Administrator
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    Daniel
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    Please do. I think I speak for most of the guys here that we enjoy just about anything car related. Models, 1/1 Barn Baby weathering- it's dead easy! 's, die-cast, R/C you name it. If its got wheels its cool with me. :D

    I still want to RC that Miller Racer I have. Old school all the way... :D
    QUOTE QUOTE #4

  4. Old Busted Hotness's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    I could see a project on that. Use RC18T bits to drive the front wheels (it's a Miller, after all) and a servo mounted back on the chassis to operate the steering through the drag link. Plenty of room under the hood for the electronics and a small battery pack.

    You'd have to fab a new front axle to use the RC18T knuckles (which are available in aluminum) and drill the wheels for a 3mm shaft with a small cross-pin for driving. Nothing terribly complicated there. You'd have the only one on your block! :)

    I get a real kick when I show one of my creations. Folks think it's a plastic model, and then I put it down and drive it. Really blows their minds, and brings the project to life.

    I'm thinking about an RC Big T now, thanks to you guys :)


    Barn Baby weathering- it's dead easy!
    This don't look like no expressway to me! - Jake Blues
    QUOTE QUOTE #5

  5. hot ford coupe's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Thanks so much for the weathering Barn Baby weathering- it's dead easy! info. I intend to use it on my T build. It will be lightly weathered.

    One great thing about this scale is, it's big enough to do static or motorized models. The bigger the better. R/c is more than welcome here.
    Sometimes a handful of patience is worth more than a truck load of brains. Have the courage to trust your own beliefs. Don't be swayed by those with louder voices. W.S. Maugham :)
    QUOTE QUOTE #6

  6. ScaleMotorcars's Avatar Administrator
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    Daniel
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    Its funny you brought up the Rc18T. Actually have an old rc10 I was eyeballing Dh for its gearbox. Sounds like you've seen it first hand. Did someone on the other forum try the same thing?
    QUOTE QUOTE #7

  7. Quote Originally Posted by ScaleMotorcars
    Please do. I think I speak for most of the guys here that we enjoy just about anything car related. Models, 1/1 Barn Baby weathering- it's dead easy! 's, die-cast, R/C you name it. If its got wheels its cool with me. :D

    I still want to RC that Miller Racer I have. Old school all the way... :D

    Wow Dan I like !! 0) leave it just the way it is beautiful did you make that ?
    QUOTE QUOTE #8

  8. Old Busted Hotness's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Nobody's chopped up a Miller yet that I'm aware of. If your RC10 has the old six-gear tranny, it's best left on the shelf. The more modern Stealth 3-gear tranny will do a much better job in a smaller package. Or you could use a TC3 diff, if you have room in the Miller's case. It's certainly more robust than the RC18T's. Tear that puppy apart and let's have a look inside


    Barn Baby weathering- it's dead easy!
    This don't look like no expressway to me! - Jake Blues
    QUOTE QUOTE #9

  9. ScaleMotorcars's Avatar Administrator
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    Daniel
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    Heres with the clockwork removed. Looks like a standard pitch gear like they used on the RC10 gearbox. haven't actually put them together yet to see if Its a match. Also would like to go with a motor mounted in-line with the frame rather then across it. Any ideals? :D
    Attached Images Attached Images Barn Baby weathering- it's dead easy!-dsc03258-jpg 
    QUOTE QUOTE #10

  10. Old Busted Hotness's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Well, this just got a lot easier. I thought it was a static model, but if it's already got a drive mechanism, you're halfway there :D

    Your first task is to measure the gear pitch. And then figure out how fast you want it to go. We can probably do it with off-the-shelf bits. As far as an inline motor goes, an electric airplane gear reduction unit would do the job.

    What's the width between the frame rails, tire diameter, and tooth count on the drive gear?


    Barn Baby weathering- it's dead easy!
    This don't look like no expressway to me! - Jake Blues
    QUOTE QUOTE #11

  11. ScaleMotorcars's Avatar Administrator
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    Daniel
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    OK. so Ive got the Old RC-10 and the spur gear seams to mesh up well with the gear in the diff. Pitch ???? haven't a clue. Any ideals?

    Between the rails its 1 1/2" Max width under the hood is 2" And Ive got 3 1/2 in length and about 3" tall still under the hood. :D
    QUOTE QUOTE #12

  12. ScaleMotorcars's Avatar Administrator
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    Daniel
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    And while Ive got you here OBH Did you see the Bugatti model in the Workbench thread. I'm going to get that one going also. Looks like all I need is a 540 motor mount. Something that just hold the motor and is adjustable. The axle runs through the frame. Spur is also the same as the RC-10.
    QUOTE QUOTE #13

  13. Deuces-wild's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Guido
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    Quote Originally Posted by ScaleMotorcars
    OK. so Ive got the Old RC-10 and the spur gear seams to mesh up well with the gear in the diff. Pitch ???? haven't a clue. Any ideals?

    Between the rails its 1 1/2" Max width under the hood is 2" And Ive got 3 1/2 in length and about 3" tall still under the hood. :D
    Count the # of teeth on the ring gear and divide by the # of teeth from the pinion should give you your gear ratio. :D
    Be nice or else ~1~**
    QUOTE QUOTE #14

  14. ScaleMotorcars's Avatar Administrator
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    Daniel
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    Got a trick for figuring out the pitch? :rolleyes:
    QUOTE QUOTE #15

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