Close

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 19
    1. Kit: , by (Member) upretirementman is offline
      Builder Last Online: Sep 2016 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/8 Rating:  Thanks: 0
      Started: 09-25-12 Build Revisions: Never  
      Not Supported

      Think about it! A way to make custom made parts for your model right on your own desktop. If you have the plans for it, a 3D model made with Blender can be exported to the desktop printer and printed out, part by part or the whole model at once.

      I do not have anything to do with any desktop 3D printer company, but I have been checking some out from time to time. At first the 3D printers were kits that you put together yourself, but lately some have new models that come fully assembled and ready to go from the box opening.

      Makerbot is one such company to have upgraded their 3D printer to a more professional model with larger size area to make your parts. The Makerbot2 now has a metal case and is ready to print parts right away. Their webpage is http://www.makerbot.com/

      Here is the overall size:



      The new model makes articles with a much smoother surface:



      The software that comes with it is much clearer than previous:



      Each part of the model can be larger than before:

      Show Complete First Post

      Show Your Support

      • This build may not be copied, reproduced or published elsewhere without author's permission.
        Please note: The first post will be displayed at the top of every page.
    JOIN THE SMC ALLIANCE NOW

  1. RonOC's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Ron
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    208
    I like it. Pretty soon these things will be in my price range.

    Then I suppose I'll need a 3D scanner to get the starting image.

    I'm guessing that one could scan a full size piece (within reason), use a computer to scale it, then print it out.

    RonO
    QUOTE QUOTE #2

  2. upretirementman's Avatar Member
    Name
    Paul
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    9
    I don't think you'd need a 3D scanner to make a part. If you had the part already, why would you need to scan it to make another one just like that one? Oh, I see. You made one tire and rim and you need 3-4 more? I think the idea is to make your design with software first and send a converted file to someone who has a 3D printer to make the printout. There are some libraries who have one now in house for the public to use. Also there are many 3D model files available free online. You could just download one, make your improvements, convert it for 3D printer use at whatever size you need. Some print in either ABS (what Lego® is made of) or PLA (a bio-material made from corn). The Makerbot2 3D printer uses PLA plastic to make the 3D prints. I would take a top, side, front, back view photo of the part and import them into Blender and then make a 3D file of the object.

    Here's a screenshot of my current project in Blender, the free 3D modeling application:
    This is completely scratch build Desktop Parts Constructor . It needs a lot of alignment work, so is not finished. Later versions have leather textured seats and a gear shift knob with prancing horse decal Desktop Parts Constructor on the top. It's been fun.

    Desktop Parts Constructor-myfer25055tr-jpg


    Desktop Parts Constructor
    Last edited by upretirementman; 09-28-12 at 12:44 PM.
    QUOTE QUOTE #3

  3. RonOC's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Ron
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    208
    Thanks, I'll do some more research into Blender and 3D printing services.

    RonO
    QUOTE QUOTE #4

  4. strevo's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Steve
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    463
    Home 3D printers are definitely improving, but 100 microns is not that great for layer thickness. That would leave definite visible stair-stepping between layers. Also, resolution is important. Hopefully they will continue to improve to the point that they can produce nice smooth parts at a reasonable cost. As for the 3D scanners, a half-way decent one still costs $50K+. I would LOVE to have one of those, but that is WAY out of my price range!
    "Success and failure are the same choice; only attitude determines the difference." Ross A. Halliday
    QUOTE QUOTE #5

  5. Don Garrett's Avatar Asst. Administrator
    Name
    Don
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    5,953
    You guys are probably beginning to understand why a TDR Desktop Parts Constructor part costs what it does. It's not a profit margin thing gang.......the printing costs in the resolutions that you guys want has come down some and as the technology gets better it'll eventually come down more, but still carries a hefty price tag.

    A duplicator is one thing but it still doesn't justify the hours of 'puter work it takes to convert and alter a 3D piece of art into a language the the printer can understand.......there are a lot of man hours that go into it and those are out of pocket costs. Also keep in mind that as with any piece of equipment there are maintenance and material cost involved.

    I'm not trying to burst any one's bubble but economical desktop parts printing is still a ways off. I'm sure it'll happen, just not quite yet.
    Grandpa McGurk.....Steppin' Large and Livin' easy.
    TDRinnovations.com
    QUOTE QUOTE #6

  6. upretirementman's Avatar Member
    Name
    Paul
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    9
    By the way, 100 microns is only the default layer thickness.

    9. What is the layer resolution of the MakerBot Replicator 2 Desktop 3D Printer?
    The 100 micron layer resolution setting on the MakerBot Replicator 2 Desktop 3D Printer enables users will be able to create smooth, professional-quality objects right off the build platform, with no sanding Desktop Parts Constructor or post-production needed. With MakerBot’s new user-friendly MakerWare software, experienced users have the freedom to explore even finer resolutions, down to 20 microns.

    I don't have any idea what layer thickness these items were printed at:

    green tractor



    aircraft nose wheel assembly




    Desktop Parts Constructor
    QUOTE QUOTE #7

  7. upretirementman's Avatar Member
    Name
    Paul
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    9
    The conversion software comes with this machine or you can download it for free now. In Blender after you're done with the 3D file, you export it as a .stl file or a .obj file, both of which Blender handles. You can also import a .stl file or .obj file, which is available online in various places. On their previous machine, it used a program called ReplicatorG.app. I downloaded it free from their website and tried it out on some models I had, including 2_wicked Monster Truck with 22 parts.

    Here is the webpage of the new Makeware software for conversion of .stl files to make a machine readable file for printing parts. It's free to download and try out with your own .stl files or .obj files:

    http://www.makerbot.com/makerware/

    Here is the blog that I use for models of vehicles, all custom made: Just look for posts by upretirementman. You may have to sign up free for access to posts.

    KC's Evo2 Place





    Desktop Parts Constructor
    Last edited by upretirementman; 09-28-12 at 12:48 PM.
    QUOTE QUOTE #8

  8. upretirementman's Avatar Member
    Name
    Paul
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    9
    I have downloaded the MakerWare software from their website and it has a installer that works fine. I used the Mac OSX version. Now it appears that the MakerWare app also import .obj files as well. I imported the 2_wicked.obj file I have and appeared very small, so I adjusted the size.

    Desktop Parts Constructor-makerware-2_wicked-jpg

    There is a Help Menu available:

    Desktop Parts Constructor-helpmenu-jpg

    Here's the Options MakerWare Window:

    Desktop Parts Constructor-optionsmakerware-jpg

    This screen allows one to select which Makerbot you have/ or want to convert for, and quality output for each.

    When you are ready to convert your model to Makerbot file format use the 'Export to File' ( if you don't have a Makerbot ):
    It's so fast that I thought it hadn't done anything when I tried, but later discovered the 'Things' folder, where the file was.

    Desktop Parts Constructor-notconnected-jpg

    Desktop Parts Constructor-makerwarefoldercontents-jpg

    Desktop Parts Constructor-makerwaresizes-jpg


    Desktop Parts Constructor
    QUOTE QUOTE #9

  9. strevo's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Steve
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    463
    Quote Originally Posted by upretirementman View Post
    By the way, 100 microns is only the default layer thickness.
    I don't have any idea what layer thickness these items were printed at:
    Those look like they had to be around 20 microns. You just don't get that smooth of a finish at 100 microns. I use a 3D printer that prints at 100 microns and it is far from anything I would consider ready to go without heavy sanding Desktop Parts Constructor , filling, priming, etc. Now 20 microns(roughly .0008") is something I could get on board with.
    "Success and failure are the same choice; only attitude determines the difference." Ross A. Halliday
    QUOTE QUOTE #10

  10. Egon's Avatar Moderator
    Name
    egon
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    1,282
    How long time do one use to draw something in that program ?
    My idea of 3D print is making a very complex shape in small scale like a Rochester carburator from a scan of the real thing, I saw that scaning in Jay Leno Garage.
    Otherwise I see no satisfaction in printing a modelkit by a computer vs handmade parts, that's the passion of making models.
    QUOTE QUOTE #11

  11. upretirementman's Avatar Member
    Name
    Paul
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    9
    Have you seen the Oct issue of Wired Magazine? Guess who and what is on the cover! Yes the co-owner of Makerbot2, Bre Pettis and the Makerbot2 Replicator! There is also an article about the Makerbot2 Replicator, and the direction of desktop printing inside.





    Would you not desire to share your model with everyone by allowing them to view it, touch it, see how hard you worked on it, and let them take photos of it, and possible make their own version of it for their own enjoyment?



    Tell me if you have made a tutorial on how you made your special model, step by step? It takes several years to make a 3D model on the computer using free 3D Open Source modeling software Blender. And can you actual drive your model around with a steering wheel and gas and brake pedals as well as a steering wheel, over hills, rock climbing?

    And make your own track to do the driving on, with your own buildings, trees and landscape?

    Here's mine:



    I made a special feature on my track that's unusual to say the least, it's possible to drive onto a platform that's attached to a UFO and take a round trip ride around the countryside at 700 feet above the ground. It's very difficult to stay on it all the way, but possible.



    You can race against up to 8 others, online as well, on my track, with your own truck/car which you can make and put in the game to drive.



    Is it hard, yes! does it take years of training, yes! Would I like to have a copy of the vehicle I designed and drove under simulation, Yes! Can I take pride in the work I did, yes!


    Desktop Parts Constructor
    Last edited by upretirementman; 09-30-12 at 02:48 AM.
    QUOTE QUOTE #12

  12. dpride's Avatar Active Member
    Name
    David
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    81
    "It takes several years to make a 3D model on the computer using free 3D Open Source modeling software Blender."
    Was this a quote from the magazine or personal experience?

    It is possible to "build a model" using only the computer but I hope most of the talented people on this forum continue to hand build most of the components of the interesting vehicles they post here.
    QUOTE QUOTE #13

  13. Don Garrett's Avatar Asst. Administrator
    Name
    Don
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    5,953
    Quote Originally Posted by dpride View Post
    "It takes several years to make a 3D model on the computer using free 3D Open Source modeling software Blender."
    Was this a quote from the magazine or personal experience?

    It is possible to "build a model" using only the computer but I hope most of the talented people on this forum continue to hand build most of the components of the interesting vehicles they post here.
    No worries David.........there are a lot of us old farts around that practice old school craftsmanship. The way I look at it is simply "a computer is a tool". Its not a replacement for hands on craftsmanship whether you're pounding on a keyboard or swinging a hammer.
    Grandpa McGurk.....Steppin' Large and Livin' easy.
    TDRinnovations.com
    QUOTE QUOTE #14

  14. D-Stroke's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Rick
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    210
    Just so cool.
    QUOTE QUOTE #15

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Quick Scale Calculator

 
Scale Calculator   Scale Factor   Real Size:     + Deluxe Scale Calculator
  1: th   Which equals Convert measurement: Reset or clear:  
  Any Scale   Scale Size:     + Deluxe Metric Calculator
 
Top