Close

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 16
    1. Kit: , by (VIP/Sponsor) hot ford coupe is offline
      Builder Last Online: Jan 2019 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/8 Rating:  (4 votes - 4.00 average) Thanks: 3
      Started: 10-11-09 Build Revisions: Never  
      Not Supported

      [B][U]The Fully Upholstered and Detailed
      Model Car Interior
      In All Scales
      [/U][/B]
      As we all know, when working in the large scale arena nowadays, a builder is faced with a greater and greater potential for increased detail and realism in his/her models. One area where such detail can be added without a whole lot of difficulty or specialized equipment is in a model's interior. Traditionally, we've been using paints, adhesives, sticky backed paper and different types of flocking The Fully Detailed Auto Interior to produce some nice "beyond the box stock The Fully Detailed Auto Interior " results, but we tend to find it's still not close enough to the real thing as we might like. With the techniques I'll show here, any modeler with a bit of experience, patience and the desire to produce something extraordinary can wind up with a unique, first class automotive reproduction well beyond the norm and with just the basic hobby tools and materials. This tutorial will be presented as a series rather than a single entity because of the large amount of information involved. This will allow me to keep the techniques organized as well as avoiding turning the tutorial into a longer version of War and Peace.

      [B][U]Table of Contents[/U][/B]

      So that we can keep things organized, and so everyone will know where things are headed, I've organized this series into a number of related tutorials. This will go a long way toward keeping this overall tutorial from turning into a modeler's version of War and Peace. We'll take things one bit at a time rather than all at once. The material will be broken up into the following individual topics

      1) Materials and Basic Tools For Interior Upholstery
      2) Seat Choice and Design
      3) The Bucket Seat - forward folding mechanism included
      4) The Adjustable Seat Mechanism
      5) The Bench Seat - forward folding mechanism included
      6) The Rear Seat
      7) Side Paneling
      8) Floor Coverings
      9) The Dash Board- Using the kit dash vs. scratch building a dash
      10 ) The Carson Top and the Headliner

      Look for these in the next few weeks as my schedule permits.

      Please note that I will be eliminating some of the comments to keep the tutorial "pure" so to speak. Questions about the procedure will be kept.

      Topic 1

      Materials and Basic Tools for Interior Upholstery

      Below is a list and photos of the tools and materials you're going to need to make pretty much all of the detail involved in your model's interior. There are a few items that may be left out, but they'll be put back in when we get to the specific procedures where they're used. The photo numbers generally coincide with the list numbers.

      1) 2 hobby knives, one with a #10 X-acto blade for skiving, the other for cutting foam padding. A good sharp pair of scissors for cutting larger pieces of leather and foam, paper, thin sheet styrene The Fully Detailed Auto Interior , etc.

      2) and 2a) Sharpening stones to keep skiving blades razor sharp.

      3) A Dremel The Fully Detailed Auto Interior tool with a drum sander (located all the way to the right) for contouring the foam padding once it's glued to its base. The other burs will be needed at one point or another.

      4) Styrene The Fully Detailed Auto Interior sheet for seat bases. This should be about 1-2mm thick for good rigidity. You don't want your seats distorting on you. Thicker styrene The Fully Detailed Auto Interior can be used if needed depending on scale.

      5)An assortment of sanding The Fully Detailed Auto Interior sticks for smoothing your plastic and final smoothing your foam padding if necessary.

      6) A good rubber adhesive. I personally use "Goo" but any adhesive good for leather, plastic, fabric etc is fine. I tend to stay away from CA because if it's not flexible, it may dry too stiff for a good result.

      7) A glue spreader which when cleaned off can double as a heated instrument. The photo shows a number of different types you can use. You can usually find them at your LHS The Fully Detailed Auto Interior .
      8) A clean flame or heat source you can use to melt plastic.

      9) and 9a) A dust mask or respirator- self explanatory

      10 ) Pin vise The Fully Detailed Auto Interior with an assortment of drills and a thick straight pin or sewing needle. This is used to make holes in your leather when you insert the buttons for the diamond tufted pattern.

      11) Good leather or vinyl. The leather and vinyl must be pliable enough to be able to be pulled over corners without distorting them.

      12) Razor saw, scroll saw, coping saw or whatever you have that can cut out styrene The Fully Detailed Auto Interior pieces. Personally I use a scroll saw from Sears. It makes fast work out of cutting my stock plastic but it's not mandatory for good results. If your plastic is thin enough, you can even cut out styrene The Fully Detailed Auto Interior patterns.

      13) and 13 a) Hobby Foam. This is a relatively dense foam rubber similar to the type they make the foam letters out of. It carves well and holds its shape under your covering while still being pliable giving it that extra bit of realism.

      14) Bare-Metal Foil or a good substitute.

      15) and 15a) Hair brushes?? Yes, hair brushes. Believe it or not, the bristles with the colored tips make excellent buttons for the diamond tufted seat. They can be bought in one of the dollar stores really cheap. They can also be painted to match your color scheme.

      16) An assortment of rulers and other measuring tools.

      Now for a very important point. One of the biggest problems I had when I was a young modeler reading all of those great articles in the model magazines was that the materials and tools they often recommended were very difficult or too expensive for me to get. They never suggested any suitable substitutes in case you couldn't find them. It made it very difficult to complete a model the way it was in the book since they never seemed to come out right no matter what you used. During all of the parts of this tutorial, if any of you have trouble getting what I've recommended, let me know. I can provide sources if your hobby shop, craft store, Wal-Mart or Hobby Lobby hasn't got them or any suitable substitute. If you find a better substitute tool or material that isn't mentioned, please let me know that also. Next installment will be Seat choice and Design

      Build Photos

      The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-det-1-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-det-2-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-det-2a-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-det-3-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-det-4-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-det-5-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-det-6-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-det-7-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-det-8-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-det-9-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-det-9a-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-det-10-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-det-11-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-det-12-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-det-13-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-det-13a-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-det-14-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-det-15-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-det-15a-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-det-16-jpg 


      Show Complete First Post

      Show Your Support

      • This build may not be copied, reproduced or published elsewhere without author's permission.
        Please note: The first post will be displayed at the top of every page.
    JOIN THE SMC ALLIANCE NOW

  1. hot ford coupe's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Jeffrey
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    7,826
    [B][U] Topic 2 [/U][/B]

    [U][B]Seat Choice and Design[/B][/U]

    Before a builder can scratch build The Fully Detailed Auto Interior a winning seat, said builder must follow a few important steps before plastic and foam is cut. Quality research is always an absolute must, since there are many different types of seat designs to choose from and not all of them will be appropriate for every model. Do you want a bucket seat, a bench type seat, a modern seat, a sports car type seat, a folding seat, an adjustable seat? Do you want a plain seat, a tuck and roll seat, a diamond tufted seat, a two tone seat, a leather seat, a leather suede combo, etc, etc.? The first thing I do is look at dozens of pictures of sports car, hot The Fully Detailed Auto Interior rod, classic and custom interiors of all kinds to figure out what looks good to my eye and what doesn't. If you Google "hot rod and custom seats" or "sports car bucket seats", you can find just about any design you could possibly want. You can also check out the cars for sale on eBay since a lot of the ads there will show great interior shots. I then sort out the style of seat I want which is usually some type of retro design to stick into a hot The Fully Detailed Auto Interior rod or custom. Once I make my final choice, out comes the ruler.

    [U]Measuring for the Seat Bases[/U]

    Once I know the style I want, I take measurements using a "go by" or guide seat which is usually one of the kit seats depending on what scale I'm working with. In short, for 1/12 scale, I take my measurements from the 57 Chevy kit custom bucket. For the same design in 1/8, either I take measurements from the Deuce or the Big T seat OR I just scale the measurements of the 1/12 seat up to 1/8 or even 1/6. Whichever way you do it is your choice. But before you start cutting, you need to make one more set of measurements. You'll need to measure the available interior area for your seat and then adjust your original measurements to fit correctly into that area. Otherwise, your seat might wind up too big or too small for your model. Remember that one kit seat might not fit into another model without a little adjustment. That's what I found out when I rescaled the 57 Chevy seat up to 1/8. The Chevy interior is wider making its seat too big for a deuce or a T so a bit of finagling is necessary. Now you're ready to start making your seat.


    The Fully Detailed Auto Interior
    Sometimes a handful of patience is worth more than a truck load of brains. Have the courage to trust your own beliefs. Don't be swayed by those with louder voices. W.S. Maugham :)
    QUOTE QUOTE #2

  2. hot ford coupe's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Jeffrey
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    7,826
    [B][U] The Detailed Interior
    Topic 3
    The Bucket Seat[/U][/B]


    Now that we have some definite measurements, we can start building the seat itself. For the purpose of this tutorial, we'll use a very simple bucket seat design in 1/8 scale for a deuce interior. See Photos 1 and 2 below. We'll be using a good quality leather and suede covering but any leather or vinyl covering that is thin and flexible can be used as well. All of the tools, materials and accessories are mentioned in Topic 1. Any extra things that come up will be included as we use them.

    [B][U]Seat Construction [/U][/B]
    Draw your base designs on a thick piece of paper, cut them out and trace them onto a 2mm thick styrene The Fully Detailed Auto Interior sheet as shown. All the measurements for this type of seat will fit the deuce. Once the bases are cut out and trimmed, you're ready to start adding your foam padding. Photo 3. Let's do the seat bottom first. Trace your seat pattern onto a piece of your thicker foam and cut it out with a sharp hobby knife The Fully Detailed Auto Interior . You'll probably need to cut out two more pieces and laminate them with your adhesive since the height of the seat will be greater than the thickness of only one piece of foam. For my seat, I cut and laminated foam pieces of different thicknesses as you can see in photos 4 to 9. Make sure when you cut your pattern, you cut larger than the tracing as shown. This will compensate for the wider contour of the seat at its top. If you look at the bottom piece before you laminate it, it should look like photos 10 and 11. When the glue has set overnight, you'll want to start contouring your foam base. When I shaped my seat cushion, I used a belt sander which if you have one, will save you some time and grief. If you don't have a sander, you can still do the job by using the sanding The Fully Detailed Auto Interior drum in the Dremel The Fully Detailed Auto Interior tool followed by some smoothing with the coarse sand The Fully Detailed Auto Interior stick. Here's how the cushion should look at this point. Photos 12 to 14. Now you need to contour the top of the seat since most bucket seats are not flat. Cut to the lines shown in photos 15 to 17.

    Your next step is to cut out the center portion which you'll do with the sharp hobby knife The Fully Detailed Auto Interior . Do this carefully but do not discard the center piece. This is what you'll make your diamond tufted or tuck and roll cushion with. Photos 18 to 20. Photo 21 shows what your foam padding looks like from the undersurface and how the leather covering will fit. Glue your padding down to the plastic seat base and let it set overnight. Photo 22 to 24. With your drum sander, you'll finish your contouring as shown in photo 25. Trim the back end of the inner cushion so there is about 4 to 5 mm from the back of the cushion to the plastic. Photo 26. The space shown is where your seat folding mechanism will go when the center section is put in place. Now we're ready to cover our padding with genuine leather. We'll do that in the next installment.


    The Fully Detailed Auto Interior
    Attached Images Attached Images The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-buck-seat-1-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-buck-seat-2-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-buck-seat-3-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-buck-seat-4-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-buck-seat-5-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-buck-seat-6-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-buck-seat-7-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-buck-seat-8-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-buck-seat-9-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-buck-seat-10-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-buck-seat-11-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-buck-seat-12-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-buck-seat-13-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-buck-seat-14-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-buck-seat-15-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-buck-seat-16-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-buck-seat-17-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-buck-seat-18-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-buck-seat-19-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-buck-seat-20-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-buck-seat-21-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-buck-seat-22-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-buck-seat-23-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-buck-seat-24-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-buck-seat-25-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-buck-seat-26-jpg 
    Last edited by hot ford coupe; 10-29-09 at 03:20 AM.
    Sometimes a handful of patience is worth more than a truck load of brains. Have the courage to trust your own beliefs. Don't be swayed by those with louder voices. W.S. Maugham :)
    QUOTE QUOTE #3

  3. hot ford coupe's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Jeffrey
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    7,826
    The Bucket Seat
    Topic 3--Continued
    Covering Your Padding With Leather

    Once your padding is done, you can start working with your leather covering. For this tutorial, we'll be making two types of bucket seats. The first one we'll do is the diamond tufted center cushion and the second is an easy tuck and roll pattern. The beauty of this technique is that you can change your pattern even after the seat is finished.


    Before we begin, I want to revisit leather skiving for a minute for those not used to the process. The most important part of the process is keeping the blade very sharp. You may want to revisit my other tutorial "Interior Upholstery--Tuck and Roll Pattern". It shows a few pictures on leather skiving and how to sharpen your blade. 'Nuff said.


    Cut your leather strips a bit wider and longer than what you want to cover. The reason for this is the most common places to get holes in the leather are at the edges. You can always cut away these areas and still have enough to cover your padding. Once the leather is skived, cut a notch as shown in photo 27 . Slip the notched area into the cut you made at the seat front. Photo 28 and 29. Apply your glue to only the top of the foam section and its corresponding area on the leather. Set the glue set about 2 minutes and secure the piece. Photo 30 to 33. Next, glue down your inner portion and then finally the outer portion. Now comes the fun part, putting down the ends without big wrinkles. Let's do the front first. Trim you leather as shown in photo 34 and glue down with a little stretching. Photo 35. Any wrinkling you have below the edge will be covered by another leather strip. Now we do the back. Trim and glue as in the photos 36 to 40. Do exactly the same for the other side. Next, we go to the front part. I decided to do the same thing as I did with the green seat shown in the previous installment. I put in a piece of red suede to match the center cushion covering. You can basically use whatever you want. The photos 41 to 43 should be self explanatory. Just don't forget to tuck the ends of your suede into the same slot your side pieces are in. Glue what you need and go on to the next step which is the outer wrapping of the seat bottom. This cures a number of ills you'll find with the seat like the small wrinkles on the sides. Take a strip of leather about an inch wide, 25 mm for those of you across the pond, but don't skiv the whole thing. Make a lengthwise line on the underside of the leather about 3/8 inch (about 9mm) and skiv the 3/8 inch part. Fold over the edge and glue it down as shown in photo 44. Glue that around the whole seat but don't do anything with the ends yet. Photo 45 You'll trim those off when you finish the seat cushion. In the next installment. we'll make both our diamond tufted and tuck and roll seat cushions.


    The Fully Detailed Auto Interior
    Attached Images Attached Images The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-buck-seat-27-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-buck-seat-28-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-buck-seat-29-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-buck-seat-30-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-buck-seat-31-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-buck-seat-32-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-buck-seat-33-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-buck-seat-34-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-buck-seat-35-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-buck-seat-36-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-buck-seat-37-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-buck-seat-38-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-buck-seat-39-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-buck-seat-40-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-buck-seat-41-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-buck-seat-42-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-buck-seat-43-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-buck-seat-44-jpg 
    Sometimes a handful of patience is worth more than a truck load of brains. Have the courage to trust your own beliefs. Don't be swayed by those with louder voices. W.S. Maugham :)
    QUOTE QUOTE #4

  4. hot ford coupe's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Jeffrey
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    7,826
    The Bucket Seat
    Topic 3--part 3
    The Diamond Tuft and Tuck and Roll Center Cushion

    Diamond Tufted Cushion

    This is the real fun part. To cover your seat section, you start with the piece of foam you cut out of the center of your foam padding and make two dots as shown in photo 1. Measure between the dots and divide by three. Then take that measurement and mark another dot that distance. Starting with the second dot, mark another dot that distance so you have 4 dots across the front end (top) of your foam piece. If you want alternating buttons, eyeball in between the dots down one row and mark the whole piece as shown in Photo 2. Take your pin vise The Fully Detailed Auto Interior and the drill bit the same thickness as one of your bristles from the hairbrush (see pictures in tools and materials Topic 1) and go straight down the holes so the drill comes out the bottom. You won't be able to see the holes in photo 2. Take the flame tipped bur you see in photo 3 in tools and materials and drill down several mm as shown in photo 3 here. This funnel shape is very important so your leather drapes correctly. In order to get that folded leather look making the diamond shapes, take the diamond disc also shown on the far left in topic 1, photo 3 and cut a V shaped slot in between all of the holes. Your pad should look like photos 4 and 5. Go lightly and don't rush this step or you will easily ruin your pad. At this point, glue a thin piece of styrene The Fully Detailed Auto Interior to the bottom of the pad and trim to pad dimensions. You can see the styrene The Fully Detailed Auto Interior under the pad in photo 6. Take a sharp pointed punch of some type and put it into the hole and press down. This will put a dimple for you to drill your holes in the styrene The Fully Detailed Auto Interior backing from the underside. Photo 7 and 8. You can drill through the prepared holes from the top but I found the foam wraps around the drill bit and will tear up your holes ruining your funnel shape. Once all the holes are cut, take your suede piece and put it over the pad in the same position as photo 9 but do not glue leather down. Now for the hard part. Take one brush bristle, make a small hole in the leather with a needle, pin or your sharp punch and thread the bristle into the hole so it comes out the bottom. Photo 10 and 11. Squeeze your foam pushing the bristle further down into the hole and with a flame heated flat instrument and melt the end of the bristle. Photo 12 and 13. Do this over the entire piece until all the holes are filled. Photo 14 and 15. The underside should look like photo 16. Trim the corners of the leather as shown in photo 17. Now you can glue the edges down. Photo 18. Once you've done that, push your center back into the main part as in Photo 19. You can also see how the outer strip is trimmed and how it looks in place. Make your seat back exactly the same way you made the bottom part.

    Tuck and Roll Pattern

    If you so choose, you can make a tuck and roll center cushion. It's way easier than the diamond tuft. Take your center pad, measure out your rolls, mark them and cut down the lines about 5mm deep the whole length of the pad. Glue your leather center piece at one edge as shown in photo T. Then with a thin edge (not sharp) push the leather down each slot one at a time and glue a portion down so when you push your next bit of leather into the slot you don't pull your leather out of the previous slot. Photo U. Do this for the entire piece and then trim. Photo W and X. When you put your center piece in place, it should look like photo Y. Now finish off your seat back and the next installment will show how to attach the two parts together with a folding mechanism for added realism.


    The Fully Detailed Auto Interior
    Attached Images Attached Images The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-diamond-1-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-diamond-2-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-diamond-3-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-diamond-4-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-diamond-5-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-diamond-6-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-diamond-7-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-diamond-8-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-diamond-9-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-diamond-10-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-diamond-11-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-diamond-12-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-diamond-13-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-diamond-14-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-diamond-15-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-diamond-16-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-diamond-17-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-diamond-18-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-diamond-19-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-tr-1-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-tr2-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-tr3-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-tr4-jpg  The Fully Detailed Auto Interior-tr5-jpg 
    Sometimes a handful of patience is worth more than a truck load of brains. Have the courage to trust your own beliefs. Don't be swayed by those with louder voices. W.S. Maugham :)
    QUOTE QUOTE #5

  5. Mario Lucchini's Avatar Super Moderator
    Name
    Mario
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    790
    Quote Originally Posted by hot ford coupe View Post
    The Bucket Seat
    Topic 3--part 3
    The Diamond Tuft and Tuck and Roll Center Cushion

    Diamond Tufted Cushion

    This is the real fun part. To cover your seat section, you start with the piece of foam you cut out of the center of your foam padding and make two dots as shown in photo 1. Measure between the dots and divide by three. Then take that measurement and mark another dot that distance. Starting with the second dot, mark another dot that distance so you have 4 dots across the front end (top) of your foam piece. If you want alternating buttons, eyeball in between the dots down one row and mark the whole piece as shown in Photo 2. Take your pin vise The Fully Detailed Auto Interior and the drill bit the same thickness as one of your bristles from the hairbrush (see pictures in tools and materials Topic 1) and go straight down the holes so the drill comes out the bottom. You won't be able to see the holes in photo 2. Take the flame tipped bur you see in photo 3 in tools and materials and drill down several mm as shown in photo 3 here. This funnel shape is very important so your leather drapes correctly. In order to get that folded leather look making the diamond shapes, take the diamond disc also shown on the far left in topic 1, photo 3 and cut a V shaped slot in between all of the holes. Your pad should look like photos 4 and 5. Go lightly and don't rush this step or you will easily ruin your pad. At this point, glue a thin piece of styrene The Fully Detailed Auto Interior to the bottom of the pad and trim to pad dimensions. You can see the styrene The Fully Detailed Auto Interior under the pad in photo 6. Take a sharp pointed punch of some type and put it into the hole and press down. This will put a dimple for you to drill your holes in the styrene The Fully Detailed Auto Interior backing from the underside. Photo 7 and 8. You can drill through the prepared holes from the top but I found the foam wraps around the drill bit and will tear up your holes ruining your funnel shape. Once all the holes are cut, take your suede piece and put it over the pad in the same position as photo 9 but do not glue leather down. Now for the hard part. Take one brush bristle, make a small hole in the leather with a needle, pin or your sharp punch and thread the bristle into the hole so it comes out the bottom. Photo 10 and 11. Squeeze your foam pushing the bristle further down into the hole and with a flame heated flat instrument and melt the end of the bristle. Photo 12 and 13. Do this over the entire piece until all the holes are filled. Photo 14 and 15. The underside should look like photo 16. Trim the corners of the leather as shown in photo 17. Now you can glue the edges down. Photo 18. Once you've done that, push your center back into the main part as in Photo 19. You can also see how the outer strip is trimmed and how it looks in place. Make your seat back exactly the same way you made the bottom part.

    Tuck and Roll Pattern

    If you so choose, you can make a tuck and roll center cushion. It's way easier than the diamond tuft. Take your center pad, measure out your rolls, mark them and cut down the lines about 5mm deep the whole length of the pad. Glue your leather center piece at one edge as shown in photo T. Then with a thin edge (not sharp) push the leather down each slot one at a time and glue a portion down so when you push your next bit of leather into the slot you don't pull your leather out of the previous slot. Photo U. Do this for the entire piece and then trim. Photo W and X. When you put your center piece in place, it should look like photo Y. Now finish off your seat back and the next installment will show how to attach the two parts together with a folding mechanism for added realism.
    Jeff....congratulations!!............this is plain fantastic!

    Mario
    QUOTE QUOTE #6

  6. hot ford coupe's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Jeffrey
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    7,826
    Thanks Mario. I did something like this before but the seats came out awful. this time I'm fairly happy the way they came out. The key to a successful seat is in the foam and the thinness of the leather covering. The original seat tutorial had backer rod as the foam. The open cells were just too big and the foam didn't really hold its shape correctly. If you go to Hobby Lobby, Michael's or a regular craft shop, you can find this foam in so many shapes like large alphabet letters, circles, sheets and even flip flop shoes. The decoratable flip flops come in thicker sections. All you need to do is remove the texture from the bottom of the soles unless it doesn't interfere with your purpose.


    The Fully Detailed Auto Interior
    Sometimes a handful of patience is worth more than a truck load of brains. Have the courage to trust your own beliefs. Don't be swayed by those with louder voices. W.S. Maugham :)
    QUOTE QUOTE #7

  7. hmaia's Avatar Active Member
    Name
    Hermilio
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    40
    Hello Jeffrey,
    I did a search for a tutorial on seats and to my joy found this jewel. I will copy, print it and add it to my instructions for the Pocher K91.
    This is a fantastic help for any modeler. Thank you so much for posting.
    Much obliged,
    Hermilio
    QUOTE QUOTE #8

  8. hot ford coupe's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Jeffrey
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    7,826
    Hey Hermillio. Thanks for the compliment. If you need any more info, Let me know and I'll get it to you. The techique applies to any scale. You just have to fiddle with the measurements. Welcome to the site.


    The Fully Detailed Auto Interior
    Sometimes a handful of patience is worth more than a truck load of brains. Have the courage to trust your own beliefs. Don't be swayed by those with louder voices. W.S. Maugham :)
    QUOTE QUOTE #9

  9. ewaskew's Avatar Active Member
    Name
    Earl
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    23
    I read this and it's a great tip and thank you for opening some door's that will be a big help to other's.
    Earl
    QUOTE QUOTE #10

  10. hot ford coupe's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Jeffrey
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    7,826
    Hey Earl. Thanks and your welcome. The tutorial actually is not completely finished. I intended to do a lot more upholstery in the interior but I caught a really bad case of burn out and stopped building for a while. At some point I will put in more info.


    The Fully Detailed Auto Interior
    Sometimes a handful of patience is worth more than a truck load of brains. Have the courage to trust your own beliefs. Don't be swayed by those with louder voices. W.S. Maugham :)
    QUOTE QUOTE #11

  11. ScaleMotorcars's Avatar Administrator
    Name
    Daniel
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    2,969
    Promoted to the Tutorial Articles.
    QUOTE QUOTE #12

  12. ewaskew's Avatar Active Member
    Name
    Earl
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    23
    Quote Originally Posted by hot ford coupe View Post
    Hey Earl. Thanks and your welcome. The tutorial actually is not completely finished. I intended to do a lot more upholstery in the interior but I caught a really bad case of burn out and stopped building for a while. At some point I will put in more info.
    Your welcome,yea burn out stops all of us sometimes.
    I'll be looking out for more as it come's along.
    Earl
    QUOTE QUOTE #13

  13. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
    Name
    Roger
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    2,200
    As I noted in my own post, I just had the curiosity this morning to look into the Tutorial section. Your way of doing seats is totally different as what I did; however, it's a good inspiration of my actual project. Your method allows the use of a rather thick lether like 0.6 to 0.8 mm; what I did on the Avanti and toronado seats required a much thinner The Fully Detailed Auto Interior leather, between 0.2 and 0.3 mm, which is more difficult to find.

    Avanti seats:


    Toronado seats:
    QUOTE QUOTE #14

  14. strevo's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Steve
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    463
    Those seats look fantastic Roger! If I didn't know better, I would swear the Toronado picture is of a 1:1 The Fully Detailed Auto Interior car.
    "Success and failure are the same choice; only attitude determines the difference." Ross A. Halliday
    QUOTE QUOTE #15

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Quick Scale Calculator

 
Scale Calculator   Scale Factor   Real Size:     + Deluxe Scale Calculator
  1: th   Which equals Convert measurement: Reset or clear:  
  Any Scale   Scale Size:     + Deluxe Metric Calculator
 
Top