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    1. Kit: , by (Active Member) bills69camaro is offline
      Builder Last Online: Sep 2019 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/8 Rating:  (2 votes - 5.00 average) Thanks: 4
      Started: 03-03-12 Build Revisions: Never  
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      I use styrene Making a tire from scratch sheet to make my tires. I like styrene Making a tire from scratch because it's easy to machine. I start by<br>cutting 4" x 4" pieces.<br>Hosted on Fotki<br>I glued 11 pieces together and drew a circle to the diameter of the tire. In this case 3.250", I make it .080" smaller because the tread thickness is .040". That will make it 3.330" final diameter.<br>Hosted on Fotki<br>I cut out the rough shape on a band saw and drill a .250" hole for the arbor.<br>Hosted on Fotki<br>The tire blank chucked in the lathe and turned to size.<br>Hosted on Fotki<br>The tire blank in the lathe and center opening started.<br>Hosted on Fotki<br>The center cut to size.<br>Hosted on Fotki<br>These are the cutters I made to profile and hollow the tire. The one on the left is the tire profile. and the two on the right are used to hollow out the tire<br>Hosted on Fotki<br>First side profile.<br>Hosted on Fotki<br>Second side profile cut and the tire hollowed out.<br>Hosted on Fotki<br>Here's an illustration of the tire treads. I do all my illustrations in Adobe Illustrator. It takes a little adjusting to make the treads wrap around the tire blank. It needs to fit end to end.<br>Hosted on Fotki<br>After the illustration fits to the tire I cut out the treads from .040" styrene. I then place each tread in it's place on a copy of the illustration (the first one got destroyed cutting out the treads).<br>Hosted on Fotki<br>This was taken on a light box. On the left are the treads placed loosely on the illustration<br>in their respective position. On the right is another illustration with a sheet of .005" styrene on top. You need to see the illustration through the styrene in order to glue the treads in position. Hence the reason for the light box.<br>Hosted on Fotki<br>The treads being glued to the styrene.<br>Hosted on Fotki<br>The treads glued in place.<br>Hosted on Fotki<br>The treads cut into strips and applied to the tire blank.<br>Hosted on Fotki<br>The tire almost finished, applying the side treads.<br>Hosted on Fotki<br>The tire sanded and painted, ready to mold and cast. The raised lettering was applied with<br>adhesive vinyl. I took an Illustrator file to a sign shop and they cut them out for me on their vinyl cutter (for a nominal charge).<br> Hosted on Fotki<br>Thats it in a nutshell. Hope you like.<br><br>Bill


      Making a tire from scratch
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  1. bills69camaro's Avatar Active Member
    Name
    bill
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
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    81
    Yes!


    Making a tire from scratch
    QUOTE QUOTE #17

  2. ThierryD86's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Thierry
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    May 2016
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    319
    Very impressive, really stunning
    QUOTE QUOTE #18

  3. tricknology's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
    Name
    Stephan
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    Oct 2015
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    7
    You want to use something at least nail hard like nail plates (not sure
    of exact name) that they use to shield wall studs where electrical wires
    go through, so you can't drive a nail through your wiring. You can use
    any piece of malleable soft steel, as given a contest between it and
    styrene Making a tire from scratch , styrene Making a tire from scratch will lose, but to cut anything efficiently, one wants
    the cutter to be sharp, and even styrene Making a tire from scratch will dull common flat stock
    sold in hardware stores. Corner braces seem to be a bit better than nail
    hard, and are a good choice, and not too expensive for making a tool.
    Old tools that are not collectable and not serviceable / restore-able
    are good choices as well. Old smooth files are great material for
    cutting tools, as we all should know given the abundance of videos on
    making high end knives out of them! Cutting any hardened metal is best
    with an abrasive wheel. While a hacksaw will cut nails and corner
    braces, it wears them quickly, and tool hard metals will just laugh at a
    hacksaw. You can use a hacksaw if you anneal the metal, but then you're
    back to metal that isn't hard. If you can shape it strictly by
    grinding, and you do not discolor it in the slightest from the heat from
    grinding it, then it will remain hard and give you a great sturdy
    cutting edge. Make CERTAIN you use full coverage eye protection. Face
    shields are really best, but full coverage goggles are a minimum. Never
    gamble on cool looking "safety glasses" that leave any gaps at all
    around the perimeter! How cool are you going to look with one or both
    eyes blinded!<br>
    QUOTE QUOTE #19

  4. tricknology's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Stephan
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    Oct 2015
    Posts
    7
    Hi Bill,
    I think I asked you this several years back, and can't find the post, but how did you cut the treads? Did I miss something in your post?
    QUOTE QUOTE #20

  5. bills69camaro's Avatar Active Member
    Name
    bill
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    81
    Hi tricknology.

    l cut the treads with my x-acto knife. Not too difficult just took a little time.


    Making a tire from scratch
    QUOTE QUOTE #21

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