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Working with brass?
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Working with brass? Working with brass? Working with brass? Working with brass? Working with brass?
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    1. Kit: , by (Active Member) miked. is offline
      Builder Last Online: Nov 2011 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/8 Rating:  Thanks: 0
      Started: 11-15-08 Build Revisions: Never  
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      I am thinking of building a chassis for my 65 vette (Grand Sport) out of brass but I have never worked with it before. I was wondering about do's and don'ts of brass or is there something else I could use that will support an 1/8 scale car. Thanks.
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  1. MADD FABRICATOR's Avatar Established Member
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    Richard D. Zimmerman
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    Working with brass is just like working with any other material. Make sure all joints are a tight fit and look for ways to reinforce critical load bearing joints. Before soldering any joint, make sure the material to be soldered is CLEAN of any foreign material. Take a fine file, paper, or emery cloth and clean the area where you are wanting the solder to stick. I prefer to use a silver based solder ( Stay-Brite brand), as sold by Micro-Mark. I also use their solder flux, which helps get good solder flow and bonding to the brass. After the joints have cooled, make sure you remove any flux residue, as it will cause corrision later on which results in loss of paint in those areas. When you go to paint the brass, lightly sand Working with brass? all of the brass surfaces and rinse well with a good quality paint prep wash. I prefer to use a self etching primer Working with brass? , prior to applying the color coats of paint.
    Hope this helps. If you have any more questions, don't hesitate to ask.
    CHEERZZZZZ !!!!!! (MF).
    Oh!!, By the way, do some practice soldering on scrap pieces of brass of preferably the same thickness as you will be using for the actual build,before trying to tackle the real project. Remember PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRACTICE. Please post some results as you press on with your project.
    Last edited by MADD FABRICATOR; 11-15-08 at 09:15 PM.
    NEVER argue with an IDIOT, for he'll only drag you down to his level and beat you with experience !!!!
    QUOTE QUOTE #2

  2. Another good brand of solder is Sterling Trimec. It is the best in the plumbing Working with brass? industry. You can find it at most plumbing Working with brass? supply stores. And remember the flux!! Like MF said with some practice you will have the solder flowing in now time! Also what are you using for heat? A torch or iron?
    It's a fine line between stupid and cleaver....
    David St. Hubbins "Spinal Tap"
    QUOTE QUOTE #3

  3. miked.'s Avatar Active Member
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    I have a iron, which would be better?


    Working with brass?
    QUOTE QUOTE #4

  4. MADD FABRICATOR's Avatar Established Member
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    Richard D. Zimmerman
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    Mike, for what your doing an iron would be the answer. You didn't state what size of iron you have on hand. Regardless of the size, you'll still have to do some practice soldering to learn to control the heat needed for the size of the parts being soldered. With an iron, the worst case would be if you had one that couldn't provide enough heat.
    They do make some very small torches, but in this case I believe it would be overkill for your needs. Remember, you're not doing a plumbing Working with brass? job with large copper pipe, so a propane torch is definitely out of the question.
    Good luck, and let us know how things progress. Just holler out if you need more help.
    CHEERZZZZ !!!!!! (MF)
    NEVER argue with an IDIOT, for he'll only drag you down to his level and beat you with experience !!!!
    QUOTE QUOTE #5

  5. Don Garrett's Avatar Asst. Administrator
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    Don
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    Miked, let me just toss in a few things here in addition to M.F.s pointers that pertain more to what may help you get started.

    Regardless of the type of iron you are using you will need a good stable surface to rest the iron on.....these puppies get hot Working with brass? , can and will burn you or your working surface if you inadvertently set it where you can come in contact with it. I picked up a 16"x16" smooth surfaced floor tile at the local Home depot and permanently mounted the wire stand that usually comes with the iron to the tile. That gives me a burn proof stable rest for the iron out of harms way.

    I also bought one of those thermal cooking gloves (the kind with fingers not a mitt) to hold parts in position as they are being heated...trust me, I learned the hard way even though I know better.

    One last tip....grab a bunch of cheapo alligator clips Working with brass? in various sizes to use as heat sinks, you will find that even with silver solder soldering, 2 or more joints that are close together will undo what you have done. Simply stick a few clamps on and around the adjacent finished joint(s) to draw heat away from them while you bring the area you are working on up to temp.

    Like M.F. said.....practice....it's well worth the effort.
    Grandpa McGurk.....Steppin' Large and Livin' easy.
    TDRinnovations.com
    QUOTE QUOTE #6

  6. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Kenneth
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    Above comments all good. Also consider getting one of these, they come in various sizes. Link below:

    Also when ever joining try to incorporate a mechancial interface to hold parts together while being soldered. For example drill and pin parts with 1/32" brass rod that once soldered in place can be trimmed off and filed smooth. There are many variations of this. Binding wire can also be used, it is a very mallable (soft) wire that can be wrapped around assemblies to hold together until all soldering is done. I use this when soldering WWI plane fuselages out of 1/16th brass tube.

    Also "tin" (apply solder first to mating surfaces) and sweat solder together; just apply heat and flux; the pre "tin" surfaces will solder together.

    If you are soldering heavy stock consider a 100 watt + soldering iron or micro torch. I personally use the iron, just make sure you give it ample time to get up to temperature.

    Always keep in mind; solder will always flow to heat and tight mating surfaces are the best.

    Ken

    Tools and Supplies for Building Scale Models | Micro-Mark: The Small Tool Specialists
    QUOTE QUOTE #7

  7. Tage's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Daniel
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    Look into resistance soldering if you plan to do any quantity of brass work.
    Check it out, I love it, it is almost instant.

    Recommended by Gerold Wingrove...
    QUOTE QUOTE #8

  8. miked.'s Avatar Active Member
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    Thanks everyone for the info. I have a couple of cars on the table I want to finish first then I will tackle this project. Thanks again.


    Working with brass?
    QUOTE QUOTE #9

  9. Bob Cline's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Bob
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tage View Post
    Look into resistance soldering if you plan to do any quantity of brass work.
    Check it out, I love it, it is almost instant.

    Recommended by Gerold Wingrove...
    I've heard they do a great job, but they cost the earth to buy.

    Anyone have plans for a homemede one?

    I'm considering a brass chassis for a future project.
    No Lathe, No Mill, No CNC
    QUOTE QUOTE #10

  10. Bob Cline's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Bob
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    No Lathe, No Mill, No CNC
    QUOTE QUOTE #11

  11. Don Garrett's Avatar Asst. Administrator
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    Don
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    Great article Bob, I'm definately going to build one...this one goes right into my favorites.....thanks.
    Grandpa McGurk.....Steppin' Large and Livin' easy.
    TDRinnovations.com
    QUOTE QUOTE #12

  12. Tage's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Daniel
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    I picked up a used 1800w LUMA unit with 5 handles, for $119.00 (Ebay)
    Page Title

    then added the "Triton" pliers that are pressure activated. ($105.00) from Luma.

    Very sweet setup if a bit pricey.
    QUOTE QUOTE #13

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