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    1. Kit: , by (VIP/Sponsor) xken is offline
      Builder Last Online: Nov 2019 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/8 Rating:  (1 votes - 5.00 average) Thanks: 0
      Started: 08-27-08 Build Revisions: Never  
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      Sorry for the large picture; but the small one you could not read the words; if someone can resize the picture please do.

      Anyway here is how I generally make the 1/16 scale wheels for my planes. I have made both 40 and 64 spoke versions with different rim configuarations. To adapt to car wheels one would need to turn or fabricate the correct hubs and rims. Rims can be hand fabricated which is how these were done before I had a lathe.

      Rims can be formed using annealed .005 brass sheet strips. For the Sopwith I secured two 3/64 rods parallel to each other to a piece of plywood 1/16 inch apart taped one end of the brass strip down and burnished the strip slowly down between and over the rods using various ends of drill bits as mandrels, dragging in on direction only. Trim the sides to finished demension curl inside o-ring and butt solder, then added rings.

      This principle could applies to all sizes.





      Here is a shot of the Sopwith wheels (64 spokes), could easily become Model A wheels with different hubs in the center. Also just FYI O-rings can be laser etched for lettering and paint filled.



      Here is a picture showing the formed rim. This principle could also be applied to making motorcycle rims.

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  1. Don Garrett's Avatar Asst. Administrator
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    Don
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    There's an old hot Making Wire Wheels rod saying..........
    "THERE IS NO SUBSTITUTE FOR CUBIC INCHES".

    Same holds true for craftsmanship....there is no substitute.
    Grandpa McGurk.....Steppin' Large and Livin' easy.
    TDRinnovations.com
    QUOTE QUOTE #2

  2. Tage's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Daniel
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    Laser etched!? OMG (Oh My Grandma)
    Ken,
    you are inspireing me and killing me at the same stroke!

    Please explain the Laser Etched process so my old brain can grasp it.
    I wish I could install a camera and mic in your shop, and just watch you work. <sigh>

    Same with Modelmaker, and Mario.

    You folks are amazing.
    QUOTE QUOTE #3

  3. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Kenneth
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    I actually developed this technique myself working with Laserpoint Inc. in Detroit. They also cut my wing ribs for me in 1/32 inch plywood. I sent them the O-rings they experimented a little with the settings for depth because they never heard of this being done before. When it all worked out they did not even charge me, since they learned a new capabilty.

    Laserpoint created the artwork using a CAD program in the circular pattern and varied the type size based on an original factory drawing of a wheel that had the exact writing on it described in great detail. Inclucing the written in French; Made in England

    They then placed the O-ring on a locating fixture and laser etched to a small depth the lettering. Which by the way when finished is hard to see being black on black.

    Then I took some slightly thinned white enamel Making Wire Wheels and wiped it into the lettering let it set and wiped the excess off with a thinner Making Wire Wheels soaked piece of cloth.





    Making Wire Wheels
    QUOTE QUOTE #4

  4. Tage's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Daniel
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    Outstanding.



    thank you.
    QUOTE QUOTE #5

  5. protarguy's Avatar Active Member
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    Hello Ken,
    I noticed the wheels for the planes are spoked different to a motorcycle wheel.
    All spokes lead in one direction.
    Is it because of a better damping while landing?

    Uli
    QUOTE QUOTE #6

  6. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Kenneth
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    That is correct; however if you look closely one side goes one way while the other side goes opposite. This enabled wheels to be used on either side, left or right and the wheel itself funtioned to a point as a spring. The German wheels used 40 spokes with a narrow hub, while the British used 64 spokes and a wider hub with spokes outboard of the wheel on one side, again for left and right use. This created more of a truss structure and hence disapated the impact forces across the wider hub to the axle. Especially with the heavier engines used later in the war; for example the Hispano-Suisa used in the SE 5a's.

    I am sure there is an engineer around who can give you a more technical explanation than I can.


    Making Wire Wheels
    QUOTE QUOTE #7

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