Close

Page 1 of 7 1 2 3 4 5 6 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 92
    1. Kit: , by (VIP/Sponsor) whodaky is offline
      Builder Last Online: Sep 2015 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/8 Rating:  (1 votes - 4.00 average) Thanks: 0
      Started: 08-27-08 Build Revisions: Never  
      Not Supported

      I mentioned in a post on my '36 3W last weekend that I had had a bit of a brain wave regarding making some narrow aluminium rims. Well here is how I went about it.
      I had an empty coke can on my bench and for some reason was looking at it and could see the makings of a wheel rim.

      I cut the top of the can just below the rolled edge at the top of the can. See the dotted line in the image below.

      I made this cut with a junior hacksaw. Which I infact use for all my modeling cuts!

      Here is the 2 pieces after cutting

      The piece we are interested in is the top of the can. Now we have to remove the centre of the top of the can, to end up with what will be half of our wheel rim.
      I remove the unwanted section by filing along the area that is indicated by the black dashes.

      I suggest filing along the edge, rather than across it. because when you start to break through, if you were filing across the edge, because the aluminium is so thin the file may grab and distort where you are cutting. Of course this may not be a problem if you are using an ultra fine file.

      OK, we have to do this to 2 cans; so we end up with 2 rims halves.


      As I will be joing these together with JB weld I needed to come up with a way to hold the rims in alignment for the joining process. There are all sorts of ways this could be done. But I want something simple, easy and didn't introduce any stress into the joint that may allow the joint to become misaligned.
      I came up with a simple piece of cardboard that goes on the inside of the rim. Also the beauty of the cardboard, is that if any JB weld oozes out of the joint onto the cardboard the cardboard is still easily removed after the JB weld has set!


      Here is a shot of the rim with the JB weld applied. Basically you are putting a layer of JB weld in the rim that bridges the 2 halves.

      Because the can has a protective coating, if you want to polish the rim as I have done in this case. You will need to sand Article: Narrow 1/8th Scale Aluminium Rims off the coating, prior to polishing. Even unpolished the finish is quite nice.



      Because I am such a lousy photographer, some of these images are pretty ordinary, but I can tell you this; the polished rim here in real life is like a piece of jewellery.
      Something you have to be awhere of, is that not all aluminium cans are the same. The outside diameter on the big diameter of these rims is 2 1/8" ( 53mm ) and the inside diameter on the small diameter ( ie where the join occurs ) is 1 3/4" ( 44.5mm ). The Coke cans I used also have a real nice conical shape in the transition section going from top to bottom ( of this rim section that is ).
      These rims fit beautifully into the Big T Michellin's. It's just a matter of fitting a centre. I am working on a centre for mine.
      These rims would make ideal rims for use on motorcycle models as well.
      They don't even need to go on a model, they are just neat to look at.
      Geoff aka whodaky
      Show Complete First Post

      Show Your Support

      • This build may not be copied, reproduced or published elsewhere without author's permission.
        Please note: The first post will be displayed at the top of every page.
    JOIN THE SMC ALLIANCE NOW

  1. Deuces-wild's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Guido
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    2,209
    That's a cool idea. Thanks Geoff!
    Be nice or else ~1~**
    QUOTE QUOTE #2

  2. Don Garrett's Avatar Asst. Administrator
    Name
    Don
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    5,953
    WOW!

    Geoff.....what a creative use of a dumpster find, and recycling too! You get this weeks gold star.
    Grandpa McGurk.....Steppin' Large and Livin' easy.
    TDRinnovations.com
    QUOTE QUOTE #3

  3. whodaky's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Geoff
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    419
    Ah ha, I wasn't after the gold star; I wanted the elephant stamp!
    If you guys make yourselves some, you'll be impressed. They look like they were spun on a lathe.
    Minimum work for maximum results and all that with out resorting to the plastic welder. Oh hang on a minute I broke that plastic welder out for the centres I am working on!
    Geoff ak whodaky


    Article: Narrow 1/8th Scale Aluminium Rims
    Last edited by whodaky; 08-27-08 at 06:27 AM.
    QUOTE QUOTE #4

  4. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Kenneth
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    2,402
    Great tutorial and work! Now turn the can upside down and make a set of [B]moon hub caps [/B] out of the dish in the bottom of the can.

    Use an aluminum polish or jeweller rouge to get a high polish with a buffing wheel and dremel Article: Narrow 1/8th Scale Aluminium Rims tool, careful to have the buff spin from center to edge. You do not want to catch an edge with a buff pad or wheel could go flying, start with a slow speed(red rouge) and gradually increase to polish (white rouge). Should look great when done.
    QUOTE QUOTE #5

  5. Don Garrett's Avatar Asst. Administrator
    Name
    Don
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    5,953
    Hang on to the center section of the can too. Cut it the long way, flatten it out and save, the aluminum is thin enough to tool interior or trunk panels...all that stuff.
    Grandpa McGurk.....Steppin' Large and Livin' easy.
    TDRinnovations.com
    QUOTE QUOTE #6

  6. Mario Lucchini's Avatar Super Moderator
    Name
    Mario
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    790
    Quote Originally Posted by Don Garrett View Post
    Hang on to the center section of the can too. Cut it the long way, flatten it out and save, the aluminum is thin enough to tool interior or trunk panels...all that stuff.
    Right!....the floorboard tranmission tunnel of my Alfa was treated that way (See pics)
    It can also be polished to a mirror like finish...

    Mario
    QUOTE QUOTE #7

  7. Rick's Avatar Member
    Name
    Rick
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    1,699
    Don't throw away the bottom of the can either. Properly cut, it makes a great spun aluminum moon hub cap.
    QUOTE QUOTE #8

  8. hot ford coupe's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Jeffrey
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    7,833
    Unbelievable!!!!!!!!! And all of those parts for the price of a couple of six packs of soda. Brilliant.
    Sometimes a handful of patience is worth more than a truck load of brains. Have the courage to trust your own beliefs. Don't be swayed by those with louder voices. W.S. Maugham :)
    QUOTE QUOTE #9

  9. whodaky's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Geoff
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    419
    Yeah a lot of uses to be made out of aluminium from drink cans.
    So I did some more thinking and came up with the beginnings of another 1/8th wheel. A long way to go before I am happy with them but I see the potential.
    Basically am doing a no hole Halibrand as well as a small window Halibrand.. The front half of the wheel is formed using the bottom of an aluminium drink can.
    Does any one know where I can get mag wheel nuts in 1/8th scale or acron nuts to suit?
    Geoff aka whodaky





    Article: Narrow 1/8th Scale Aluminium Rims
    QUOTE QUOTE #10

  10. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Kenneth
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    2,402
    For those who wish to make aluminum can stock easier to work with and form; [B]anneal it like this. [/B]

    Take an ordinary Sharpie black pen and draw a cross hatch pattern on the aluminum.

    Now slowly heat the aluminum evenly until the black ink turns brownish all over.

    Then quench in water; now the aluminum should be very mallable and bend and form very easy.

    If you see tiny bumps raised on the surface of the aluminum you heated too hot Article: Narrow 1/8th Scale Aluminium Rims .

    Practice on a few pieces to you get the feel; even if you have formed a piece you can still anneal it again and work it some more.

    For those who wish to purchase [B]SOFT[/B] metal materials follow this link. Be advised they have a $20 minimum.

    http://www.specialshapes.com/tools.asp?product=BRASS2

    Last edited by xken; 08-28-08 at 08:33 AM.
    QUOTE QUOTE #11

  11. hot ford coupe's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Jeffrey
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    7,833
    Thanks Ken. Looks like you really come up with some great tips. Keep 'em comin'. Quality info like that from an expert like yourself is why we're all here.
    Sometimes a handful of patience is worth more than a truck load of brains. Have the courage to trust your own beliefs. Don't be swayed by those with louder voices. W.S. Maugham :)
    QUOTE QUOTE #12

  12. slingshot's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    530
    What an excellent tutorial and looks like a fairly easy job to do. The tips on using the aluminum and making it easier to work with are great and I will definitely give it a try. I'm definitely going to try this for at least the outer rim on my Chaparral. The wheel centers you came up with look like some photos I have seen race cars use in the 40s and 50s if memory serves me right.
    QUOTE QUOTE #13

  13. whodaky's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Geoff
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    419
    Thanks xken for the thoughts on the mag wheel nuts. I got to thinking about a couple of toys I bought a while back. The wheel rims of which I am using on some 1/6th rims I have on the go. Damn I need to make time to do that tutorial. Anyhow I was thinking about the centres from those toy's wheels. Turns out each wheel has 8 wheel nuts that will be suitable for use in the 1/8th wheels shown in my last post on this thread. Just got to dissect them from the centres.
    Also annealing the thin aluminium is interesting. I have annealed thicker aluminium ( 1.2 to 1.6 mm ). But I think I will give it a try on the really thin stuff. It may alleviate some of the tearing that occurs when pressing the thin aluminium into a die.
    Slingshot the wheel shown above is actually one piece, that is it includes the rim. But it is only the front half of the wheel. A rim is required for the rear half.
    You are right a lot of early race cars and in fact hot Article: Narrow 1/8th Scale Aluminium Rims rods used this no hole style of mag wheel and in fact were generally made of magnesium.
    I have a lot of big scale irons in the fire at the moment. So I am going to have to set these wheels aside for now and concentrate back on my 1/6th 3W window and the injection setup for the small block Chev. But rest assured I will be thinking more about how I am going to go about improving my method for making these no hole and also small window aluminium Halibrands


    Article: Narrow 1/8th Scale Aluminium Rims
    Last edited by whodaky; 08-29-08 at 06:42 AM.
    QUOTE QUOTE #14

  14. whodaky's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Geoff
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    419
    Xken, just had a look around the scale hardware site. Lot of neat stuff. Did an order for some carraige head threaded bolts and nuts, nickel plated Article: Narrow 1/8th Scale Aluminium Rims . The size may be a touch on the small side, but I want to see what they look like.
    Thanks again for the link.
    Geoff aka whodaky


    Article: Narrow 1/8th Scale Aluminium Rims
    QUOTE QUOTE #15

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Quick Scale Calculator

 
Scale Calculator   Scale Factor   Real Size:     + Deluxe Scale Calculator
  1: th   Which equals Convert measurement: Reset or clear:  
  Any Scale   Scale Size:     + Deluxe Metric Calculator
 
Top