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    1. Kit: , by (VIP/Sponsor) whodaky is offline
      Builder Last Online: Sep 2015 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/8 Rating:  (1 votes - 4.00 average) Thanks: 0
      Started: 08-27-08 Build Revisions: Never  
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      I mentioned in a post on my '36 3W last weekend that I had had a bit of a brain wave regarding making some narrow aluminium rims. Well here is how I went about it.
      I had an empty coke can on my bench and for some reason was looking at it and could see the makings of a wheel rim.

      I cut the top of the can just below the rolled edge at the top of the can. See the dotted line in the image below.

      I made this cut with a junior hacksaw. Which I infact use for all my modeling cuts!

      Here is the 2 pieces after cutting

      The piece we are interested in is the top of the can. Now we have to remove the centre of the top of the can, to end up with what will be half of our wheel rim.
      I remove the unwanted section by filing along the area that is indicated by the black dashes.

      I suggest filing along the edge, rather than across it. because when you start to break through, if you were filing across the edge, because the aluminium is so thin the file may grab and distort where you are cutting. Of course this may not be a problem if you are using an ultra fine file.

      OK, we have to do this to 2 cans; so we end up with 2 rims halves.


      As I will be joing these together with JB weld I needed to come up with a way to hold the rims in alignment for the joining process. There are all sorts of ways this could be done. But I want something simple, easy and didn't introduce any stress into the joint that may allow the joint to become misaligned.
      I came up with a simple piece of cardboard that goes on the inside of the rim. Also the beauty of the cardboard, is that if any JB weld oozes out of the joint onto the cardboard the cardboard is still easily removed after the JB weld has set!


      Here is a shot of the rim with the JB weld applied. Basically you are putting a layer of JB weld in the rim that bridges the 2 halves.

      Because the can has a protective coating, if you want to polish the rim as I have done in this case. You will need to sand Article: Narrow 1/8th Scale Aluminium Rims off the coating, prior to polishing. Even unpolished the finish is quite nice.



      Because I am such a lousy photographer, some of these images are pretty ordinary, but I can tell you this; the polished rim here in real life is like a piece of jewellery.
      Something you have to be awhere of, is that not all aluminium cans are the same. The outside diameter on the big diameter of these rims is 2 1/8" ( 53mm ) and the inside diameter on the small diameter ( ie where the join occurs ) is 1 3/4" ( 44.5mm ). The Coke cans I used also have a real nice conical shape in the transition section going from top to bottom ( of this rim section that is ).
      These rims fit beautifully into the Big T Michellin's. It's just a matter of fitting a centre. I am working on a centre for mine.
      These rims would make ideal rims for use on motorcycle models as well.
      They don't even need to go on a model, they are just neat to look at.
      Geoff aka whodaky


      Article: Narrow 1/8th Scale Aluminium Rims
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  1. Don Garrett's Avatar Asst. Administrator
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    Geoff........isn't this BIG stuff fun....are you thinking salty 1/4 scale, flathead powered belly tanker yet?
    Grandpa McGurk.....Steppin' Large and Livin' easy.
    TDRinnovations.com
    QUOTE QUOTE #17

  2. whodaky's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Yes it is Don. I have always had a lot of 1/8th stuff (actually a whole heap more on it's way from Rick), not that I needed anymore. But I like the idea of a lucky dip type purchase!
    The thing with the times in which we live and the technology of today, is the ability to be able to communicate with others anywhere in the world and to access so much information and new ideas. As well as being able to see before hand and then purchase stuff online at home.
    I have tended to become a bit reclusive these days and have been throwing myself into this big scale stuff. But I have so many ideas, I seem to be bouncing around between different projects and aspects of those projects.
    I had better stop here or this will turn into a novel.
    Ah ha Don I did purchase a 1/4 Hemi from e-bay a while back. Got a single 4 barrel intake manifold on the go for that. Tells one's self, I don't need to start a 1/4 scale lakes car !!!!!!!!!!!!!
    Geoff aka whodaky


    Article: Narrow 1/8th Scale Aluminium Rims
    Last edited by whodaky; 08-30-08 at 05:35 AM.
    QUOTE QUOTE #18

  3. whodaky's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    So much for working on the 1/6th fuel injection today. What xken wrote about annealing aluminium in a thread above got the better of me. So today I decided I would have a play with heating and quenching. It does work, but I think it tended to make the aluminium to soft for what I am doing with the no hole halibrands. Although I did produce a second rim using aluminium I did anneal. So at least now I have the beginnings of a pair.
    The last couple of days I have been thinking of a better way of going about making these no hole halibrands, a way that will be easier and get me better unifromity and consistency.
    I think the go will be to make a wooden buck. When I get this happening I will do a tutorial on it.
    But seeing as I now have two partially completed no hole Hallibrands, I thought I would do a series of inspirational mockups. I like looking at images and I am sure you guys do also. The rims in the images haven't been polished they have been sanded and then rubbed with a scotch brite scouring pad!
    Geoff aka whodaky

















    Article: Narrow 1/8th Scale Aluminium Rims
    QUOTE QUOTE #19

  4. Don Garrett's Avatar Asst. Administrator
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    They really look fantastic on the chopped 3 window.....
    Grandpa McGurk.....Steppin' Large and Livin' easy.
    TDRinnovations.com
    QUOTE QUOTE #20

  5. whodaky's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Yes they do Don. When I took the shots of the phaeton, I thought they looked good. Then I set up the 3 window, looked through the view finder and went WOW.
    I have been messing with aluminium cans all day. Finding out a lot of subtle differences in different brands. Subtle differences that I think can work in my favor. Then you have the smaller aluminium cans to add into the mix as well. It's going to be hard to hold back on these wheels! I will never see drink cans in the same light again! The great thing is you don't have to go looking for them. Just have to have the vision and put the time into them to produce a neat wheel. Can't wait for the nuts and bolts to get here from the US.
    Geoff aka whodaky


    Article: Narrow 1/8th Scale Aluminium Rims
    Last edited by whodaky; 08-30-08 at 06:53 AM.
    QUOTE QUOTE #21

  6. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    The wheels look great!!! Yes annealing does make the aluminum soft; actually dead soft and as you work it it will harden up again.

    Now for your next adventure in aluminum. Not sure about Austrailia stores; but here in the US one can go to a DIY center suchas Lowe's or Home Depot and obtain what is called roof flashing pretty cost effectively. One roll could be a lifetime supply for most modellers. However, there are various suppliers that offer various hardnesses of the flashing which is already mallable. What I do in the store is to hand bend the corner to test the mallability of it. It should bend easily with just your fingers; if it does buy it. If you want some a little harder; buy the pre bent pieces of flashing for butting up against walls and chimneys.

    The beauty of the roll stock is cost, size, thickness and mallability. It is thicker than can stock so can be used to hammer shapes, can be made softer by annealing above and buffs up beautifully. Look at my Sopwith Camel model; all the aluminum cowl panels are made using the roll flashing. Another good thing since it is so cheap and easy to work with you can experiment and try different things or parts and if not correct try again.

    Another trick I use to make patterns is to get overhead presentation films from an office suppliy store; usually 8.5 x 11 inches. One side is textured to receive ink, cut a piece and lay it over the area trying to be covered and draw (you can see through the film and trace perfectly) on the frosted side; cut and trim with knife or scissors to make a pattern. Mark hole locations as needed to. Then transfer to aluminum sheet cut and trim, also good to make duplicate and opposite pieces, opposite pieces (left and right) just turn pattern over. Keep the grain of aluminum in mind when matching pieces.

    Now go shopping.

    QUOTE QUOTE #22

  7. whodaky's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Thanks xken, I will check out the local hardware store here tomorrow. I have used some of the angles and extrusions from the hardware store for various stuff!
    Will also dig out some of the images of some of my aluminium work, in both model cars and full size.
    Geoff aka whodaky


    Article: Narrow 1/8th Scale Aluminium Rims
    QUOTE QUOTE #23

  8. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Looking forward to seeing pictures....I am a picture kind of person.

    Ken
    QUOTE QUOTE #24

  9. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Here is a handy tool to have if you are thinking of doing some aluminum forming. My wife has a steel version of this for her silver smithing work. I have this wooden for my work. This would be really goood for doing hub caps. Can be purchased from MiroMark.



    QUOTE QUOTE #25

  10. Deuces-wild's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    I've seen something like that in a harbor freight catalog... Might be worth looking into.
    Be nice or else ~1~**
    QUOTE QUOTE #26

  11. Don Garrett's Avatar Asst. Administrator
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    One of these days, maybe, someone will come up with a hobby size English Wheel.
    Grandpa McGurk.....Steppin' Large and Livin' easy.
    TDRinnovations.com
    QUOTE QUOTE #27

  12. Deuces-wild's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Should be easy to make one..... That is if you work at a machine shop.. I'll ask one of the guys at work to set me up with all the stock. This one should be small enough to clamp in a bench vise.
    Be nice or else ~1~**
    QUOTE QUOTE #28

  13. whodaky's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    xken, that wooden block with the concaved depressions looks interesting. I may have to look into getting one of those. For what I am planning for the no hole Halibrands I will be doing something with a convex shape. But that I will make.
    Went looking for images. Some of these I have shown before. The first is a GMP 1/18th diecast of the So Cal coupe that I modified. The hood is hand formed from 1.2mm aluminium and polished after metal finishing. Pretty straight forward stuff, but very affective. The reason I use 1.2mm for some stuff, is it allows for easier metal finishing where required. That is file and sanding Article: Narrow 1/8th Scale Aluminium Rims any imperfections that have been introduced from the forming of the pieces.
    Geoff aka whodaky





    Article: Narrow 1/8th Scale Aluminium Rims
    Last edited by whodaky; 03-07-10 at 05:14 AM.
    QUOTE QUOTE #29

  14. whodaky's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Next is a Hot Article: Narrow 1/8th Scale Aluminium Rims Wheels 3W 1/18 diecast. I am building this to resemble a real car, the Super Bell Axle Company coupe. A lot more work in the front of this one. The nose is made from a few shaped sections that I TIG welded together. The hood was a lot easier. Again all done in 1.2mm aluminium! That's the real hot Article: Narrow 1/8th Scale Aluminium Rims rod on the right!





    Article: Narrow 1/8th Scale Aluminium Rims
    Last edited by whodaky; 08-30-08 at 10:06 PM.
    QUOTE QUOTE #30

  15. whodaky's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Here's one I forgot I had on the go. 1/18th Pontiac diecast. Didn't like the shape of the roof, needed to lower it's profile a touch; so I decided to reskin it. Speaking of English Wheels, the first shaping I did on this piece before trimming and other shaping was done on a full size English Wheel. Just had to be real careful where my fingers were, working on such a small piece.
    Geoff aka whodaky






    Article: Narrow 1/8th Scale Aluminium Rims
    Last edited by whodaky; 08-30-08 at 11:17 PM.
    QUOTE QUOTE #31

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