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    1. Kit: , by (Active Member) protarguy is offline
      Builder Last Online: Jul 2018 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/8 Rating:  (1 votes - 5.00 average) Thanks: 0
      Started: 04-11-08 Build Revisions: Never  
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      Hello folks,
      this is my method for lacing up wheels:
      First I remove the drum brakes or wheel centers.



      Next thing to do is to drill the holes for the new spokes:



      The old plastic spokes show the way and angle..

      To center the rim and in this case drum brake I make a jig out of sheet with a
      center axle:





      Now to the fun part: the spoking process. The spoke ends are made of brass tube with a diameter of 0.8mm outside and 0.5mm inside. I use another jig for cutting the tube in the right lenght.
      Spokes for 1/8 or 1/9 scale are made of 0.45 mm stainless steel insect pins.
      For smaller scales like 1/12 or even 1/16 I use 0.3mm stainless steel rod and spoke ends out of vinyl tube.




      Here´s a finished wheel for a 1/16 scale Harley Davidson Model F from Aoshima My way of lacing wheels /Entex



      And Yes !the wheel is perfectly centered, it is just the camera angle that makes it look like this..

      Here´s the finished bike:

      My way of lacing wheels-40-jpg

      Hope it looks convincing!

      Try It!

      Uli
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  1. Don Garrett's Avatar Asst. Administrator
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    Don
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    Great tutorial Uli....Thank You.
    Grandpa McGurk.....Steppin' Large and Livin' easy.
    TDRinnovations.com
    QUOTE QUOTE #2

  2. hot ford coupe's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Jeffrey
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    Uli, this is a fantastic tutorial and very much appreciated. Thanks so much for sharing this info. It's what we really needed.
    Sometimes a handful of patience is worth more than a truck load of brains. Have the courage to trust your own beliefs. Don't be swayed by those with louder voices. W.S. Maugham :)
    QUOTE QUOTE #3

  3. Nortley's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Hi Uli, Thank you for posting this article. I have a set of Norton rims and hubs that I machined years ago and never got them spoked. A couple of questions, please. Are the spokes glued in, and with what kind of glue? Are the hub ends of the spokes bent or anything to catch the hub spoke holes? Do you do anything to represent the mushroom head at the hub end of a real spoke? That's a fine looking Harley.
    Scorpio - Builds models the way the prototype should have been built.
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  4. protarguy's Avatar Active Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nortley View Post
    Hi Uli, Thank you for posting this article. I have a set of Norton rims and hubs that I machined years ago and never got them spoked. A couple of questions, please. Are the spokes glued in, and with what kind of glue? Are the hub ends of the spokes bent or anything to catch the hub spoke holes? Do you do anything to represent the mushroom head at the hub end of a real spoke? That's a fine looking Harley.
    Hi Nortley,
    the spokes are glued with cyano glue. You can also use epoxy glue, but I like to work fast.. The hub ends are bent to catch the holes just like a 1:1 spoke. I do not do anything to represent the mushroom head , at least up to now.
    First I insert the spoke with the brass
    "nipple" into the rim and then I slip the other end into the hub ( and fix it with super glue).
    If you want to represent the mushroom head you have to buy insect pins with a flat end and you have to work the other way round. First into the hub, then into the rim. In my eyes a more complicated way.
    You have to cut the spokes slightly shorter than normal, slip the brass rod over it then insert the brass rod into the rim. A fellow modeler used this method spoking a MZ racer wheel:
    http://www.wettringer-modellbauforum...tuser=0&page=2
    You need three hands to handle those 20 spokes per side..
    But you´re right it looks more like the real thing..

    Here is my Norton Manx from Revell My way of lacing wheels /Italeri the reissue of the Protar kit:



    Okay, those brass rod ends should be a little shorter but way much better looking than plastic spokes..

    Hey and if you can stuff a Harley motor into a Norton frame you can also lace those d...n wheels!!

    Uli


    My way of lacing wheels
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  5. Nortley's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Uli, thanks for the information. You're right about the real bike and the model wheels - know where I can get a large block of time? I just had an idea for spoke heads - a micro dab of plastic steel applied with a pin point after assembly and painting. Now I just have to find those rims and hubs, rebuild the snow blower, fix the neighbors snowplow, get in next winter's firewood,... and then spoke the wheels.
    Scorpio - Builds models the way the prototype should have been built.
    QUOTE QUOTE #6

  6. protarguy's Avatar Active Member
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    Hi Nortley,
    what is "plastic steel" ?
    Uli


    My way of lacing wheels
    QUOTE QUOTE #7

  7. Nortley's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Hi Protarguy, Plastic Steel is a name brand for goop in a tube that is used for superficial repairs around the home. It is about the consistency of cold molasses and dries to a fairly impervious, hard mass that firmly sticks to whatever clean surface that it dries upon. Because of its consistency, it levels to a smooth, rounded surface as it settles and dries. It is slow drying. There are actually other metallic My way of lacing wheels colors in the same resin My way of lacing wheels goop, I've seen Plastic Aluminum and Plastic Brass. Definitely do not use this stuff as a filler for general model work - the solvents in it will cause plastic parts to mutate. Which brings us to - I honestly don't know if a similar product under another brand name is available in Germany, but a hardware or auto parts store may be a good start. I suppose that because of the aforementioned solvents, this may be a restricted product within the EU.
    Scorpio - Builds models the way the prototype should have been built.
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  8. hot ford coupe's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Danke sehr, Uli. Ich habe viel hier gelernt.
    Sometimes a handful of patience is worth more than a truck load of brains. Have the courage to trust your own beliefs. Don't be swayed by those with louder voices. W.S. Maugham :)
    QUOTE QUOTE #9

  9. protarguy's Avatar Active Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nortley View Post
    Hi Protarguy, Plastic Steel is a name brand for goop in a tube that is used for superficial repairs around the home........ I suppose that because of the aforementioned solvents, this may be a restricted product within the EU.
    You´re right Nortley,
    if you can´t eat it it will be restricted..

    The man from the local hobby shop even told me that Tamiya My way of lacing wheels paints will be available only until this year´s end because of some dangerous ingredients other than water.

    But I will look for a similar product like plastic steel.
    Thanks!

    Uli


    My way of lacing wheels
    QUOTE QUOTE #10

  10. Tage's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Last edited by Tage; 03-03-09 at 09:12 PM.
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  11. hot ford coupe's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Oooooh! That looks like some great stuff. I gotta try that and see how it polishes up. If that's a metal that can be shaped easily like plastic, I think we've found a cheaper way to cast metal parts for a better look.
    Sometimes a handful of patience is worth more than a truck load of brains. Have the courage to trust your own beliefs. Don't be swayed by those with louder voices. W.S. Maugham :)
    QUOTE QUOTE #12

  12. Bob Cline's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nortley View Post
    Uli, thanks for the information. You're right about the real bike and the model wheels - know where I can get a large block of time? I just had an idea for spoke heads - a micro dab of plastic steel applied with a pin point after assembly and painting. Now I just have to find those rims and hubs, rebuild the snow blower, fix the neighbors snowplow, get in next winter's firewood,... and then spoke the wheels.
    I've used small drops of 5 min. epoxy My way of lacing wheels on short pieces of styrene My way of lacing wheels hex rod to simulate acorn nuts. I think the epoxy My way of lacing wheels might be viscous enough to work as a spoke head.
    No Lathe, No Mill, No CNC
    QUOTE QUOTE #13

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