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    1. Kit: , by (VIP/Sponsor) Old Busted Hotness is offline
      Builder Last Online: Nov 2018 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/8 Rating:  Thanks: 0
      Started: 02-19-11 Build Revisions: Never  
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      Hey, I like shiny as much as the next guy. But I like rusted & busted, too. And if you're building a rat rod, shiny ain't gonna cut it.

      The same technique I use for rust also works very well for adding surface texture to smooth parts. Cast iron and carpet look pretty similar when you get down to it. Your brain fills in the logical gaps based on context; a seat looks fluffy and a manifold looks hard even though they have exactly the same texture under the paint.

      This is my secret weapon:

      TowerHobbies.com | TOPR1090 Top Flite Microballoons Filler 8 oz

      First, mask off the area you want textured:



      Lay on a nice wet coat Textures & Weathering, not as hard as you think! , get out the Microballoons, and pour it on while the paint is wet.



      Then paint again, a light coat this time.



      And we've got a nice cast-iron manifold.



      For nice fluffy seats, don't re-paint after adding the Microballoons. The Microballoons are microscopic glass beads, so they'll pick up whatever color is underneath. Notice the "cloth" seats and "hard plastic" cover on the seat back; they were painted the same color, from the same can.

      Weathering Textures & Weathering, not as hard as you think! is a whole nother can of worms, but still uses Microballoons, mostly where you want heavy rust.



      The RaTbucket has a very rough surface texture. I used flat black from a spray can, first a heavy coat to get the color, then a mist coat, held far away, to throw a little surface on it. You'll have to experiment to get a technique; you don't want to take painting advice from me as my technique is terrible. I hold the paint too close to the surface and move it too fast, but I get decent results because I've been doing it that way for 40 years.

      There's also a very weak dark-gray wash applied. This makes the flat black look old.

      Now for heavy rust:



      It doesn't get much nastier than this. Make the actual holes from the back with a Dremel Textures & Weathering, not as hard as you think! sanding Textures & Weathering, not as hard as you think! drum. If you're working with styrene Textures & Weathering, not as hard as you think! , let it cool off every few seconds as you want to grind the plastic rather than melt it.

      Paint around the holes with red-brown and pour some Microballoons on while it's still wet. Then add flat red, flat black and flat orange. Don't let the paint dry between colors; you want them to bleed together.

      At the top of the photo you'll see some "peeling paint" which is actually .005 styrene Textures & Weathering, not as hard as you think! .



      This eggshell effect is achieved by painting over not-quite-cured epoxy Textures & Weathering, not as hard as you think! . Unpredictable.



      There's a lot of texture/weathering going on here. And all of it is necessary.

      Any questions?
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  1. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Fantastic! I had no solution for the rather coarse texture a wheelhouse should have. The Microbaloons are the answer! I just have no idea if this product is available in Switzerland; I will have to search.
    QUOTE QUOTE #2

  2. 3.Star's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Michael J.
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    Yepp, that's right. Forgot to thank you, OBH, that your RC builds and this thread encouraged me, to try some wheathering as well.
    Had only done antiseptic factory-new models until then and didn't dare to get one of the 1/8 projects messed up. Took up the challenge with an 1/9th scale Type 82 Kubelwagen by Revell Textures & Weathering, not as hard as you think! (not too pricey to kick it in the trash). All of your tricks and hints were working fine and made a realistic looking model.
    @Roger, will try to find some source for the microballs in CH.

    Yours
    Michael
    QUOTE QUOTE #3

  3. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Quote Originally Posted by 3.Star View Post
    @Roger, will try to find some source for the microballs in CH.
    Thank you Michael! Indeed, I toyed with the idea to use fine sand Textures & Weathering, not as hard as you think! or flour on wet paint; never did some test. Anyway, I was not too far away!
    I may also use the microballs on the engine castings as those parts are "glatt wie ein Bébé Füdli"! Sorry, I cannot translate that in English and I hope you understand some Swiss German expressions!
    QUOTE QUOTE #4

  4. 3.Star's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Hello Roger,
    after I've been working some time in Switzerland years ago, I am quite familiar with Swiss German and understand the phrase. It is not that easy to find some sources for the microballoons in Switzerland. Material seems to be treated like hazardous stuff by law and only sold for commercial use in large amounts.
    But we modellers never give up, so I found two dealers to fulfill your needs:
    suter swiss.composite group (Page 164 of the catalogue)
    Klebstoffe MICRO BALLOONS 250 ccn - Küng-Modellbau AG eShop
    Tried the flour method already and wasn't too happy with the results. Think I am not that talented. The use of flocking Textures & Weathering, not as hard as you think! material was more promising for me. For the use of sand Textures & Weathering, not as hard as you think! ...I remember our unforgotten Mario Lucchini, who took some bird's sand Textures & Weathering, not as hard as you think! and airbrushed it mixed up with paint to get a casted surface on a 1/8 E-Type engine block. There must be still the thread somewhere in the Forum.

    gruezi
    Michael
    QUOTE QUOTE #5

  5. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Thank you Michael for the addresses. I know Suter Swiss, I bought there the "rubber" for the tires.
    I don't know if there are different kind of flour (OK, there is the white one and the dark one), but I did not try.
    Airbrushing Textures & Weathering, not as hard as you think! with sand Textures & Weathering, not as hard as you think! ? Poor airbrush Textures & Weathering, not as hard as you think! , even if the sand Textures & Weathering, not as hard as you think! is mixed with paint!
    Nice week-end!
    QUOTE QUOTE #6

  6. strevo's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Roger,
    I don't know if you can get it in Switzerland, but Semolina flour is usually coarser than regular flour and might work well to create a grainy surface. It might be easier to get and cheaper than microballons.
    Semolina - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    "Success and failure are the same choice; only attitude determines the difference." Ross A. Halliday
    QUOTE QUOTE #7

  7. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Quote Originally Posted by strevo View Post
    Roger,
    I don't know if you can get it in Switzerland, but Semolina flour is usually coarser than regular flour and might work well to create a grainy surface. It might be easier to get and cheaper than microballons.
    Semolina - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Well, Steve, thank you for your contribution at my education! As I'm not responsible for the food department, I have no idea if this flour is available, I will have to ask at the kitchen boss. I imagine that some coarser or finer flours are available. However, I'm far, far away to try: the paint will be done just prior the final assembly; the body is not yet done...
    Edit: It's never too late to look at the dictionary: of course we have that! it's "semoule" in French...Certainly cheaper than the microballs!
    Last edited by Roger Zimmermann; 02-08-13 at 12:38 PM. Reason: Comment added
    QUOTE QUOTE #8

  8. strevo's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Roger, I haven't tried it myself, so I can't say for sure whether it will work well, but I thought it was worth trying considering how cheap flour is. Good luck!
    "Success and failure are the same choice; only attitude determines the difference." Ross A. Halliday
    QUOTE QUOTE #9

  9. You could probably use granulated sugar, too. Just avoid water-based paint with it.


    Textures & Weathering, not as hard as you think!
    This don't look like no expressway to me! - Jake Blues
    QUOTE QUOTE #10

  10. Egon's Avatar Moderator
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    egon
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    We have an excellent tut to do rust here:
    http://www.scalemotorcars.com/forum/...rustmarks.html
    QUOTE QUOTE #11

  11. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    This is an old topic, but this afternoon I tried the flour method. It's no good: when the paint is still wet, the flour should be spayed on the surface because by pouring the flour, it absorbs the paint most immediately and too much flour is staying. I tried to spray the floor; the only result was a dirty airbrush Textures & Weathering, not as hard as you think! !
    The microbaloons seems more promising.
    QUOTE QUOTE #12

  12. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Hello Roger!

    I have done a lot of experiments in these techniques and I do suggest that no ONE method is satisfactory, but that a broader approach, a buffet, is more satisfying! . . . -if you want to paint over and then dissolve the grit? salt is better than sugar, do not use flour as it does absorb pretty much any fluid, and remember that the salt can be made finer by simply crushing it under a spoon, or the head of a hammer, (ask the boss of the kitchen if you can play with your food!) -Also a nice texture can be made with baking soda! I have also used baking soda to reinforce "Super Glue" fillets. (Very strong!) -Public smoking is verboten in California, but back when it was allowed, public ash trays often had a very fine sand Textures & Weathering, not as hard as you think! ? -pet stores that specialize in reptiles sell several grades of sand Textures & Weathering, not as hard as you think! , and model train stores also sell "Ballast" sand Textures & Weathering, not as hard as you think! , as well as many grits and colours for making landscapes.

    If your interest is solely to create a "cast texture" this should give you lots to play with. -Do not forget to photograph some of what your doing as you work, not necessarily to post, but for you to be able to look at your own progress with a second "pair of eyes"! -I really do believe that it helps us to be more critical and objective. Painters often hold paintings up to a mirror to "look" at their work a new. Try to avoid getting too attached to any one technique, techniques are best thought of as tools. -If you want to explore painting? Don't ask me! I have done too much and I drive people crazy when they are sent to help me, because I am not a linear thinker, and I know, and will explore a dozen ways to paint, without ever actually making any progress!

    Thank you for all that you share!

    -Don
    Last edited by MODEL A MODEL; 02-17-18 at 01:46 PM.
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #13

  13. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Thank you Don to jump at this topic! It seems that you are the man to ask! (and get multiple answers...) My goal is to reproduce the underbody coating used in the wheel wells and, in case of the Mark II, under the entire body. I'm not yet over with the flour: I will make a new test by waiting till the paint is almost dry and see what happens with the flour.
    I did yesterday another experiment with flour mixed with cellulose thinner Textures & Weathering, not as hard as you think! . The flour is not staying in suspension as I saw later...But I spayed that over a previous unfortunate try. This time, the few flour which got out was mixed with the previous attempt and the result was much better. However, as it was an accident, I doubt that I can duplicate it for the entire underbody.
    More than 50 years ago, when I began the first version of the Avanti model, I sprayed the underbody even before the body was done and I had to glory idea to mix something to the black paint to make it harder. The result was not at all what I expected, but it was a nice matt black undercoating I was unable to duplicate later!
    QUOTE QUOTE #14

  14. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Hello Roger!

    I think that I did mention once, (twice?), that I became aware of you and your work while I was searching for information sources, for the Continental Mk II.
    I had purchased all the manuals, and was looking through the web for posted images, restorations, clubs, and forums. -I had also done the same for the Toronado!

    And! that is how we met!

    I also think that I have made it clear, that you have opened my eyes to what is really possible. -Which sounds sort of silly, after all, your just reproducing every atom, as you find them! -but still, I would not have realized much of what you must have seen as small but do-able.

    We share the same "philosophy" of model making, and to apply an under-body coating is the right thing to do. -on Manuel Olive Sans BMW 507, and on Mr. Baigent's Ferrari, both would have had something? -and both are incomplete for its lacking?

    But maybe? they were right to not hide all that detail?

    Under coating, is a feature of most cars, and its application is historically significant, in that it was not done from the beginning and so it is an indicator of where in the long line of automobiles does a certain car fall. -However its appearance, on a model, I would group with the techniques, of paint application. Similar to "weathering" and "distressing" -and like those techniques, it can too easily be over-done!

    You are an intelligent, patient, and methodical modeler. May I suggest that you forgo the use of flour / sand Textures & Weathering, not as hard as you think! / what ever, and use your airbrush Textures & Weathering, not as hard as you think! instead?
    -if you starve the airbrush Textures & Weathering, not as hard as you think! of air, drop the PSI, and hold it farther away from the model surfaces, you can achieve a spatter of paint, in a light pass, not wet, and not complete but intentionally "dry", and dusted on. Repeating until you are satisfied with the effect, will retain for you more control over the process, and not obscure the details that you have labored so long to create. Try this, apply a very dry and "misty" paint. Not wet, and not complete, but just a dusting, let it dry completely and then repeat. -I have done this many times, on 1:1 Textures & Weathering, not as hard as you think! models, to give sheet metal or smooth plexi-glass the "look" of plastic, like the texture of any modern appliance.

    -I think that you have stated that you are not really comfortable working with your airbrush Textures & Weathering, not as hard as you think! ? WELL! this technique should be right up your alley!

    Experiment of course, the variables are paint thickness, (you do want it thicker so it does not level out), air pressure, (you want the air pressure low, so that the paint does not form fine particles)(However you do not want giants blobs, either!) -and- (keep you airbrush Textures & Weathering, not as hard as you think! clean, clean up after each session so the airbrush Textures & Weathering, not as hard as you think! will perform repeatedly "bad"), distance from the surface to be painted,(hold the airbrush Textures & Weathering, not as hard as you think! farther back than usual so the paint particles can actually start to dry while still in the air), and the speed in which you make your passes, (apply the paint in a wide "dusting" fashion, -do not stop moving, and remember that you will only have complete coverage after repeating this whole process, many times) Let the paint dry completely between coats, you can let it go for days if you like. And review your progress. If there are areas that have details that you want to coat with the under-painting color but not the texture, paint those as normal, and the adjacent textures will suggest a complete underpainting. (I'm recommending that you can be selective in the application of the under-painting with-out total coverage) And patience! of course! too many people rush through this part of the model making process and do not know how to maintain control of the process.

    You probably know all this, so I hope I have not offended.

    Please take this for a friendly suggestion, from one of your students.

    -Don
    Last edited by MODEL A MODEL; 02-19-18 at 12:23 AM.
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #15

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