Close

Results 1 to 12 of 12
    1. Kit: , by (VIP/Sponsor) hot ford coupe is offline
      Builder Last Online: Mar 2021 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/8 Rating:  Thanks: 0
      Started: 03-08-07 Build Revisions: Never  
      Not Supported

      The next big step in our instruction booklet is the initial stages of body construction. I'll be posting this chapter in 4 or 5 subchapters so you'll be able to work on some earlier steps while I complete the later ones. This will be a long tutorial and will take more time to complete the entire the whole process. So Here goes.

      Subchapter 1 Opening doors

      Ath this point we have a huge decision to make. Do we or do we not open the doors and trunk (boot for you guys over the big pond)? This decision is based on two main factors. Factor 1 is that the deuce is big enough that it demands these kind of working features and factor 2 is whether or not you think by opening the doors you'll get in over your head. For those that have no interest in opening doors, then keep an eye on this tutorial when it gets to the painting stage. If you feel up to the challenge which is not hard at all, then don't worry. I'll walk you through each step so your results will come out like they're supposed to. I suggest you read all the way through the subchapter before you start so you'll know what will come down the road and maybe change your minds to attemp these techniques.

      The big challenge here is the clean up and corrections you'll need to do after you've separated the doors and trunk lid from the body. If you take a good look at the body, you'll notice that the panel lines on the inside of the body are about twice the width of the ones on the outside. When you cut them, you'll have jagged edges to clean up on both sides of your cut, which means that after you're done, your doors and lid may be significantly smaller than their cut out openings . That results in panel lines that are too wide and out of scale. In other words, your model will appear more toy like which is what we've been trying to avoid all along. We've mentioned this in a previous chapter and as promised, we'll take care of that problem in this chapter.

      The door jamb detail is also all wrong. That means we'll need to make some relatively minor corrections with styrene Chapter #5 Subchapter #1-Opening Doors strips. The good thing is that the corrections won't compromise the box stock Chapter #5 Subchapter #1-Opening Doors status of so it's not considered scratch building. The mods are pretty easy. Therefore, this tutorial is designed to introduce you to akking not just minor detailing like wires and labels, but the more advanced detail correction with some of the raw materials used in more advanced construction. Don't let this intimidate you or keep from trying these techniques. They're easy and if you make a boo boo, it's still correctible without having to get a new kit. Like I said before, ou won't get in over your head on this. Say goodbye to the world of kit building and say hello to the world of scale automotive replica engineering. After learning the techniques in this tutorial, you'll have come up to a new level of building.

      The bery first thing I did was to get a number of pictures of what the doors and dor jambs look like on the real thing. You can't do what you don't know or haven't seen. Here are a few pics of the real deal.





      Notice how the surfaces are stepped. We need to duplicate that. The next thing I did was to sand Chapter #5 Subchapter #1-Opening Doors the body and make sure there were no sink marks or defects especially around the panel lines.



      That way, after the parts are cut, cleaned, modified and put back together later on, the parts will line up again evenly like the real thing. You'll be able to use your surfaces as positioning guides. I then used a razor was to cut along the panel lines to separate the parts but under no circumstance do I remove the sprue Chapter #5 Subchapter #1-Opening Doors down the center of the interior opening. Without that critical support, you'll run a huge risk of the bottom door bead distorting, bending and breaking in two. It's still a correctible situation but why look for trouble when you can avoid it. It will be removed later on.



      I try to make my cut as close to the body side of the line so I get a better gluing Chapter #5 Subchapter #1-Opening Doors surface to add my modifications. I'll do the same thing when we cut out the trunk lid. As you can see from the research pic, the door edge has a stepped appearance. Also, you can see that the upholstered panel is much narrower than kit panel. The corresponding body door jamb actually comes out past the door opening so you have a better door stop. This is what your rear door edge looks like after it's just been cut away from the body.





      Mark the edge of the door like in the next photo



      and with a real sharp knife blade and light pressure, score into the pencil line over and over again until you get a definite edge.

      Show Complete First Post

      Show Your Support

      • This build may not be copied, reproduced or published elsewhere without author's permission.
        Please note: The first post will be displayed at the top of every page.
    JOIN THE SMC ALLIANCE NOW

  1. hot ford coupe's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Jeffrey
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    7,833
    Continued--------

    If you rush this last step and use too much pressure, you run the risk of running your blade off the pencil line and damaging your door edge or slashing your digits. Use a lighter pressure with more strokes than a heavier pressure with fewer strokes. If the job takes a bit longer, no problem. Remember, you may be able to fix the door but slashing the digits causes bleeding Chapter #5 Subchapter #1-Opening Doors and screaming. Next, you turn your blade horizontally and create the first stair step by removing plastic down to the depth of your cut (about 3/32 inch or just short of a millimeter), smoothing it out as you go along.



    I use the blade in an adzing motion and sanding Chapter #5 Subchapter #1-Opening Doors sticks. Once that's done, fit the interior panel as shown until it fits well and sand Chapter #5 Subchapter #1-Opening Doors the sides of the white panel until you've created the second step.



    At this point, once the panel fits well, we need to fit the door handle, adjust the inner black part until it rotates freely (do not overdo), and make sure the panel fits all the way down without the inner catch binding or interfering with the full seating of the panel. Once that's done, you'll need to make your upholstery panel thickness correction. Draw a line on the panel, take your hobby knife Chapter #5 Subchapter #1-Opening Doors and score a line into the plastic just short of 1 mm deep like shown in the photo.



    Round out the sides of the groove like in the next photo and sand Chapter #5 Subchapter #1-Opening Doors .



    Do this all around the sides and the bottom but not at the top. This amount of work should keep you guys busy for a while so I can complete the next few steps in our build. Next, we'll do the final door corrections, our body door jambs and start some of the painting.


    Chapter #5 Subchapter #1-Opening Doors
    Sometimes a handful of patience is worth more than a truck load of brains. Have the courage to trust your own beliefs. Don't be swayed by those with louder voices. W.S. Maugham :)
    QUOTE QUOTE #2

  2. Rick's Avatar Member
    Name
    Rick
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    1,699
    Wow, what a great job you're doing on this tutorial Jeff. I know its still early in the build, but we're learning so much from you. Its really appreciated!

    Rick
    QUOTE QUOTE #3

  3. Don Garrett's Avatar Asst. Administrator
    Name
    Don
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    5,953
    Ditto that.....just a year or so ago this guy was intimadated by scratch building and detailing, no stoppin' him now. Hat's off to you Jeff! l: l: l: l: l:
    Grandpa McGurk.....Steppin' Large and Livin' easy.
    TDRinnovations.com
    QUOTE QUOTE #4

  4. hot ford coupe's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Jeffrey
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    7,833
    Thanks guys, I have you to thank Don for pushing me as well as a number of you other guys on SMC and SA.

    I honestly never realized how dog gone long it takes to get a museum quality model done. After carefully watching and following what some of the real pros on this site and some others do, I figured out what the real secret for good work was. I found out there was no secret. It was just attention to detail along with careful planning and problem solving that makes things work. Every so often I see posts here where someone says "I can never do it that well" or "I'll never be able to do that" or "I'll never be that good". Granted some folks have more talent than others but to me that only means someone can master a technique faster than some others. Given the desire, the patience and especially and adequate amount of time specifically for that individual, anyone can produce really great stuff if only they could be convinced that they really could do it. Just read my signature and have confidence in yourself. Like many of you guys did for me, I'd like to do the same for others who love this hobby and who want to improve their skills. I don't even care if someone learns something from me and then winds up doing it way better than I can. I'll still be happy as heck that I had something to do with that. I'll be right up front in their cheering section. And now, I think I've had a long enough day so I'll say goodnight and then doi
    kfuuid oaiudf odh88u d------Dh


    Chapter #5 Subchapter #1-Opening Doors
    Sometimes a handful of patience is worth more than a truck load of brains. Have the courage to trust your own beliefs. Don't be swayed by those with louder voices. W.S. Maugham :)
    QUOTE QUOTE #5

  5. Mario Lucchini's Avatar Super Moderator
    Name
    Mario
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    790
    HFC:
    Congratulations for this BIG job you are doing.Even The Shadow was impressed!
    Jokes apart, everyone in this forum should be so grateful for your initiative, keep on this please.
    As soon as I free myself up, I'll be joining you in this effort with whatever I can do for the cause...
    Best regards
    Mario
    QUOTE QUOTE #6

  6. Mike1981's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    358
    Wonderful work Jeff, this really is the ultimate guide to the monogram Deucel:
    QUOTE QUOTE #7

  7. robjos32's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    robert
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    697
    Yet another well explained tutorial. Awesome work Jeff.
    You can have any color you want, as long as it's black. Henry Ford
    QUOTE QUOTE #8

  8. hot ford coupe's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Jeffrey
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    7,833
    Thanks again. I'm not sure when the next part will come out but it will be soon. The trunk lid is about half done. After that, we prime the doors and pick out our color schemes. Then we add the doors and trunk lid and the stock firewall and we start the body painting.


    Chapter #5 Subchapter #1-Opening Doors
    Sometimes a handful of patience is worth more than a truck load of brains. Have the courage to trust your own beliefs. Don't be swayed by those with louder voices. W.S. Maugham :)
    QUOTE QUOTE #9

  9. Deuces-wild's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Guido
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    2,209
    l:l:l: :D l:l:l:
    Be nice or else ~1~**
    QUOTE QUOTE #10

  10. slingshot's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    530
    Great tutorial on opening the doors and making the door jams, seems like a lot of modelers don’t go the extra step to make an accurate doorjamb.

    I haven’t tried this technique yet but I might the next time I try to open a door, it’s for cutting open a door (or any other part you want to cut) using thread.

    http://www.bonediggers.com/2-3/doors/doors.html
    QUOTE QUOTE #11

  11. hot ford coupe's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Jeffrey
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    7,833
    Hey slingshot. The trouble with 1/8 scale is that some of the detail is so big, you can easily tell what's accurate and what's not. That's one reason I work so slow. It's not really difficult but it's just really time consuming. I did try the string trick and it works pretty well. I usually use it on smaller projects because the plastic is a lot thinner Chapter #5 Subchapter #1-Opening Doors than on the deuce. Plus, to get the doors cut, you really just need to push a sharp edge into the line and the door literally falls off after you cut the little straps.


    Chapter #5 Subchapter #1-Opening Doors
    Sometimes a handful of patience is worth more than a truck load of brains. Have the courage to trust your own beliefs. Don't be swayed by those with louder voices. W.S. Maugham :)
    QUOTE QUOTE #12

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Quick Scale Calculator

 
Scale Calculator   Scale Factor   Real Size:     + Deluxe Scale Calculator
  1: th   Which equals Convert measurement: Reset or clear:  
  Any Scale   Scale Size:     + Deluxe Metric Calculator
 
Top