Close

Results 1 to 10 of 10
    1. Kit: , by (VIP/Sponsor) hot ford coupe is offline
      Builder Last Online: Feb 2021 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/8 Rating:  Thanks: 0
      Started: 03-02-07 Build Revisions: Never  
      Not Supported

      So far, we've been sticking pretty close to the kit and our result is looking pretty good. However, box stock Chapter #4 - Simple Superdetailing status doesn't mean that we can't do a few things to spice up our model. There are a lot of simple "tricks" we can do and a number of materials we can easily find that can really add to the model without destroying its box stock Chapter #4 - Simple Superdetailing status or without resorting to scratchbuilding. We've all done these things when we wired up the engine bays and fuel systems of our box stock Chapter #4 - Simple Superdetailing 1/25 models. Therefore, this chape\ter of the tutorial is dedicated to some simple superdetailing techniques for the engine and other assemblies that will really make your work sparkle. Fortunately, the manufacturer has seen fit to include spark plugs, wiring and plumbing Chapter #4 - Simple Superdetailing which we mormally have to add with the smaller scale kits. Our chapter will be presented in two sections. First, we'll review our techniques and then we'll apply them to the model. You'll see in later stages of the build how you'll use these same tachniques for other parts.

      One great way to make our engine look more three dimansional and more realistic is to add a series of washes Chapter #4 - Simple Superdetailing . A wash is nothing more than the addition of a very diluted solution of paint to a part to shade the deeper portions of that part. A painted scale model part, even those as large as 1/8 can still tend to look a bit flat and a bit too clean to look real. Usually, the wash is some shade of black or dark gray but may be different depending on the color of the surface to be treated. A silver, blue or gray finish would take a black, gray or darker blue wash. A white surface may need a gray wash while a yellow surface may need a dark orange or brown wash. When the wash is applied, it usually runs into the "cracks" and ridges of the part.

      Similar to a wash is dry brushing Chapter #4 - Simple Superdetailing color onto a part. Instead of adding shadows to the recesses, you add lighter paint to the high areas or in other words, highlighting. For example, you might want to paint a part a dark or medium metallic Chapter #4 - Simple Superdetailing base coat Chapter #4 - Simple Superdetailing and hit the high areas with a lighter metallic Chapter #4 - Simple Superdetailing . Also, some painted parts may have lost little "chips" of paint if hit with a tool or road debris. You add these areas with a silver or aluminum paint. Other parts may have been splashed with mud or dirt or have rusted areas. Your imagination is your limit.

      Another add-on, that helps the realism is label decals. These can be made with the hilp of the computer and either decal Chapter #4 - Simple Superdetailing paper or other media which can be glued to a part. I believe that a sheet of product decals is already in the making on the site.

      Texture is also a great way to treat a part. We've already done this to our engine block to maki it look like cast metal. There are also a number of other parts which would do well with this same treatment. The tranny, exhaust and intake manifolds and running gear parts are some good examples.

      Aded wiring and plumbing Chapter #4 - Simple Superdetailing definitely adds to the realism of your engine. While some of the wiring and plumbing Chapter #4 - Simple Superdetailing have been included with your kit, there are no wires for the starter, the generator and horn. You can also find plumbing Chapter #4 - Simple Superdetailing lines that are not included.

      One method we can't forget is color variation. When you think about what metal parts you've been given in the kit, most of it is chrome. Personally, I don't like a lot of chrome on my models because as we said before, kit chrome can look a bit plastic and toy like. Also, a lot of chrome on a car to me is way overdone. Less is more and the final product is more elegant. I don't however mind a number of different shades for my metal parts. The way I handle this is with the use of metalizers. I like to use Modoelmasters metalizers in the rattle cans because they come in a good assorment of shades from aluminum plate down to the dark gunmetal. They're also very easy to use. Poloshing some of the parts and leaving other metal parts dull also accomplishes good shade variation. We also can add to the model by using a number of colors as well. As you can see in my engine pics, I've used orange, dark blue, light blue, red and white. This adds a lot of interest for the eye to pick up.



      Now on to the "how to".
      Show Complete First Post

      Show Your Support

      • This build may not be copied, reproduced or published elsewhere without author's permission.
        Please note: The first post will be displayed at the top of every page.
    JOIN THE SMC ALLIANCE NOW

  1. sydeem's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Sydney
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    1,188
    That Is Really Beautiful!
    Syd
    QUOTE QUOTE #2

  2. hot ford coupe's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Jeffrey
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    7,833
    The "How To" :

    [B][U]The Wash[/U][/B]

    The big problem with this technique is not to overdo it. Remember that with washes Chapter #4 - Simple Superdetailing , less is more and that if you overdo it, it's worse than if you didn't do it at all. You can use lacquer Chapter #4 - Simple Superdetailing , enamel Chapter #4 - Simple Superdetailing , oils, acrylic Chapter #4 - Simple Superdetailing , water colors and even chalk. My own personal preference is to use water colors because they clean up easy with water and can be easily removed if I mak a mistake. They also can be adjusted after they dry to remove unwanted layers. Acrylic Chapter #4 - Simple Superdetailing is a bit more difficult because once it has a chance to dry, it becomes insoluble in water and you can't remove booboos so easily. The same holds true with lacquer Chapter #4 - Simple Superdetailing and enamel Chapter #4 - Simple Superdetailing . I usually start with an 8:1 mixture of water to paint. I mix that with a small brushful or two of dishwashing liquid to reduce the surface tension or ele the wash will bead up. I then apply a small bit and lit it run into the deepest portion of my part. Depending how strong the effect is, I ether add paint or water until the mix looks about right. Then, I go to work. After the paint dries, you'll see a telltale "dry Line" that looks out of place.



    You simply remove the line with a damp piece of paper towel rolled up into a point leaving the deeper wash in place.

    [B][U]Dry Brushing[/U][/B]

    This technique can be used when you want to highlight a part or simulate wear, dirt, grease and paint chipping on parts. Using a metallic Chapter #4 - Simple Superdetailing paint, load your brush and wipe off most of the paint on a paper towel. Then rub the brush over the area you want worn until you get what you want. this wlll take some practice so don't worry if it doesn't come out the first time. For chips, don't remove as much paint and dab the area so you get a small jagged chip.



    An offshoot of dry brushing Chapter #4 - Simple Superdetailing is dry misting. The difference is that dry misting uses the rattle cans instead of the brush. I used this technique for the exhaust manifolds for the Pontiac engine. I first sprayed the whole piece iwth Tamiya Chapter #4 - Simple Superdetailing white primer Chapter #4 - Simple Superdetailing , After that was dry, I masked off the pipe and sprayed the manifold with Modelmaster's buffing gun metal in the usual way. After that, I misted the surface with gun metal with the can about 2 1/2 feet from the part giving it a grainy, cast metal texture. I call it dry misting because the mist is almost dry when it hits the part. After that was dry, I misted the surface with Modelmaster's buffing magnesium with the can also about 2 1/2 feet from the part but with a lighter mist so I get the grainy mist just on the highest spots and not in the recesses. The result looks like a wash but in reverse like a highlight. For added detail, I'll dry brush some stainless steel over the very high spots like the bolts. I also lightly buff the hig spots. Remember not to overdo this.



    Here's a closer view.




    [B][U]Brand lLabels and Metal Plates[/U][/B]

    For this technique, you need a computer program that will resize a scanned label down to size. I won't go into that now because each resizing program has its own protocol. I first print out the labels on thin paper, cut them out and stick then on with white glue. I'll then spray the part or brush on a little clear coat Chapter #4 - Simple Superdetailing to make the label look painted on. Check out Mario Lucchini's gallery and look at his engine. This is what things should look like. Also, Syd Deem has graciously printed up a set of labels for us in one of the posts.

    [U][B]Additional Engine Wiring[/B][/U]

    Preparation for adding this kind of detail is usually done before the parts are completely painted with final details being added afterward. The tools you'll need are a pin vise Chapter #4 - Simple Superdetailing with small twist drills, some thin wire hopefully in scale for the job, come CA adhesive, possibly some thin styrene Chapter #4 - Simple Superdetailing rod both round and hexagonal and some really good research pictures of how things are wired up. The key to this is not the technique itself but knowing where the wires go.
    After a part has been prepared, locat the spots where the wires will be placed. Choose a twist drill about the diameter of the wire and carefully drill your holes. Finish painting the parts and carefully clean out the holes. With a little CA at the tip of the wire, insert it into the hole and you're done. Sometimes a wire will exit a 1:1 Chapter #4 - Simple Superdetailing part with a plastic collar around it. First, glue a small slice of styrene Chapter #4 - Simple Superdetailing rod a bit bigger than the wire to your part, drill your hole, paint the part and insert wire. You may also need to add a terminal to that part. That's done by adding a lsice of hex rod to simulate the nut and a piece of round rod to simulate the bolt. Drill your hole and go from there.

    [B][U]Color Variation[/U][/B]

    Our final technique really adds a lot of interest for the eye to pick up. As you can see from my engine, what used to be the chrome parts, althoug still bare metal are painted in defferent shades of Modelmaster's buffing metalizers.



    The rocker covers and intake are aluminum plate and polished over a bit with SNJ polishing powders, the carbs are stainless steel with just the highlights polished, the valley coner is magnesium and the exhaust manifold is gun metal. I decided to leave some parts still in chrom because the parts really weren't too bad. I repaired the cut areas where the sprue Chapter #4 - Simple Superdetailing was removed with a bit of BMF Chapter #4 - Simple Superdetailing , not the ultra chrome but the regular type. You may need some magnification to get these pieces down. You can also use the BMF Chapter #4 - Simple Superdetailing in other areas to dress up your engine.



    Hopefully, this tutorial has helped to increase your understanding of some of the simple optical "tricks" to add realism and interest to your build. Later on, we'll do more detailing as we progress through the rest of the build.

    Next tutorial will be the body and opening the doors and trunk. l:


    Chapter #4 - Simple Superdetailing
    Sometimes a handful of patience is worth more than a truck load of brains. Have the courage to trust your own beliefs. Don't be swayed by those with louder voices. W.S. Maugham :)
    QUOTE QUOTE #3

  3. hot ford coupe's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Jeffrey
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    7,833
    Thanks Syd. Looks like you got the comment in just before I finished the second part.


    Chapter #4 - Simple Superdetailing
    Sometimes a handful of patience is worth more than a truck load of brains. Have the courage to trust your own beliefs. Don't be swayed by those with louder voices. W.S. Maugham :)
    QUOTE QUOTE #4

  4. Mike1981's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    358
    Great stuff Jeff, ive learnt alot from this latest chapter and the previous chapters have reinforced what i already know, its never too late to learn something newl:
    QUOTE QUOTE #5

  5. robjos32's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    robert
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    697
    Thanks again for this tutorial, your engine looks beautiful. As usual I eagerly await the next installment of this build. I cannot wait to start on my version of this build.
    You can have any color you want, as long as it's black. Henry Ford
    QUOTE QUOTE #6

  6. hot ford coupe's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Jeffrey
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    7,833
    I'm glad you guys are getting out of these tutorials what I intended. They're meant to teach beginners the basics and refresh the minds of the more experienced. I know that going through this myself, I've reminded myself of countless things I've forgotten from my younger modeling days, and learned to see and deal with what I never could before. When I was a kid just starting in superdetailing, no one really taught the basics. It was usually the advanced stuff that you found in the magazines and many of us had to shovel through a lot of stuff and spend a lot of cash on supposed junk we couldn't make work only because there was no one around to show us the basics to make them work. There were never any good builders in the neighborhood to learn from and the guy who ran the local hobby shop was a miserable old fart (about as old as I am now, hee hee) who only sold the models and never built any. Besides, he used to have a nasty flatulence problem especially if he wanted you out of the store. Many other "expert" builders and hobby shop owners were kind of arrogant and rude and wanted to keep their techniques secret. I've always wanted to change that kind of thing so modelers didn't have to struggle blindly anymore to learn what to do to get really good results. It makes the hobby so much more enjoyable and so much less frustrating. It's a way to give back. So thanks all you guys for the kind words. Fortunately, we're not done yet and there's a lot more to learn.


    Chapter #4 - Simple Superdetailing
    Sometimes a handful of patience is worth more than a truck load of brains. Have the courage to trust your own beliefs. Don't be swayed by those with louder voices. W.S. Maugham :)
    QUOTE QUOTE #7

  7. j_nigrelli's Avatar Active Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    33
    this is great!

    any chance of divulging the url of this "Syd Deem has graciously printed up a set of labels for us in one of the posts. "

    thanks for the work of putting this all together.
    QUOTE QUOTE #8

  8. sydeem's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Sydney
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    1,188
    Check my gallery. If anyone wants different sizes and does not have a graphics program let me know.
    Syd
    QUOTE QUOTE #9

  9. hot ford coupe's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Jeffrey
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    7,833
    Thanks Syd. I don't want that great set of labels to get lost.


    Chapter #4 - Simple Superdetailing
    Sometimes a handful of patience is worth more than a truck load of brains. Have the courage to trust your own beliefs. Don't be swayed by those with louder voices. W.S. Maugham :)
    QUOTE QUOTE #10

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Quick Scale Calculator

 
Scale Calculator   Scale Factor   Real Size:     + Deluxe Scale Calculator
  1: th   Which equals Convert measurement: Reset or clear:  
  Any Scale   Scale Size:     + Deluxe Metric Calculator
 
Top