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    1. Kit: , by (VIP/Sponsor) hot ford coupe is offline
      Builder Last Online: Feb 2021 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/8 Rating:  Thanks: 0
      Started: 02-06-07 Build Revisions: Never  
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      As promised, I wll add this addendum to the installment #2. We'll talk about using filler so you won't have to stop building.

      People are always asking, and for good reason, which filler to use, which one is the best and how to make it work correctly. For my 2 cents, as long as your filler does what you want it to do, works well providing invisible seams, isn't too expensive and is stable, i.e. it doesn't change shape over time, handling or temperature; you can use any filler available. What works fantastic in one person's hand can be garbage in someone else's. In addition, many fillers Installment #2-a  Using Filler and techniques have a significant learning curve and require some practice for it to work correctly. So, again, if you get the results you want, then that's the final aim. Just make sure you do not wind up getting trapped by the "Holy Grail" syndrome, meaning that if you use this particular material, you just apply it, the material will smooth itself and your models will forever be perfect. That used to happen to me all the time. I'd read in a model magazine that everyone swears that this material, "Ultracrap" is the only thing you should ever use. The only place you could get the stuff was about 50 miles away from your house and my dad wouldn't take me there. Finally, I'd somehow get ahold of some and it's the worst stuff I could ever have used. Why? Because it was a bad material? A resounding NO. I never took the time to learn how to work with it. Always remember that you never let the material do what it wants to do. You make it do what [U]you[/U] want it to do and that's where I made my mistake.


      Personally, I use several materials for fillers Installment #2-a  Using Filler depending on the situation. For broad, mildly deep defects, I like to use a two part system like Evercoat glazing putty Installment #2-a  Using Filler , because it doesn't shrink, it sets fast and very hard and sands really smooth. Make sure you use an organic respirator with this stuff because it's toxic. For really shallow and small defects, I may use a smooth model putty Installment #2-a  Using Filler like Squadron Installment #2-a  Using Filler Green or White. I've even been known to use a hard dental wax for really fine defects. For really deep defects or seams that are wide open, I'll first glue in some scrap styrene Installment #2-a  Using Filler to make up the largest part of the bulk and then over coat with the two part putty Installment #2-a  Using Filler . You never want to try and span a gap with your putty Installment #2-a  Using Filler because it will make a weaker repair which may crack while you're handling the part somewhere down the road. Your strongest filled area is one which is completely backed up by your structural material whether it's styrene Installment #2-a  Using Filler , resin Installment #2-a  Using Filler or metal. It would be like trying to solder a wide defect. It just doesn't work well. You also don't want to build up a modification like fins. You want to make a "framework" for the fins in styrene Installment #2-a  Using Filler and then use the putty Installment #2-a  Using Filler for the final shape. That's the way it's done in the 1:1 Installment #2-a  Using Filler lead slinging world.

      Where a lot of inexperieced modelers go wrong is in the preparation of the defect and shaping of the putty Installment #2-a  Using Filler . I do not apply the putty Installment #2-a  Using Filler to an unsanded surface. It's like paint prep. Paint and putty Installment #2-a  Using Filler won't stick to a slick, dirty or oily surface. When it's being shaped, many builders don't wait long enough for a good set. No matter what it says on the can, I usually let the part sit overnight after the filler is applied. BTW, it takes about that long for me to get the smell out of the hobby room so I can get to the next step. Dh
      Another thing is that I start with gross removal tools like the Dremel Installment #2-a  Using Filler , knife or files but I do not go to final contour. I switch to a coarse sand Installment #2-a  Using Filler stick, sanding Installment #2-a  Using Filler wet and switching to finer sticks as I get close to contour. The final work is always done with the finest abrasives like 400 -600 grit wet paper backed up by a small block to contour and then finished to about 800 or 1000 grit. The edges should be feathered out leaving no seams. You check your results by spraying on your primer Installment #2-a  Using Filler to "magnify" the defect. Then correct the same way. It takes time to get good results, So don't rush.

      One thing I mentioned is that I sand Installment #2-a  Using Filler wet. This is better for several reasons.

      1) Sanding Installment #2-a  Using Filler creates a lot of friction and thus a lot of heat. This can actually melt your surface and make the smoothing process impossible. Your surface can get gummy and tear. The water acts as a lubricant and coolant to reduce some of the friction and also the heat.

      2) Dry sanding Installment #2-a  Using Filler always clogs up your abrasive paper and makes it harder for it to cut efficiently increasing your work, the friction and the heat. So you're working against yourself. You'll see that between sanding Installment #2-a  Using Filler and trying to keep your abrasive clean, you spend much more time sanding Installment #2-a  Using Filler .

      3) When the sanding Installment #2-a  Using Filler debris starts to clog the abrasive, those areas then can pack down hard and become coarser abrasive areas and scratch, no! gouge the daylight out of your surface. You'll sit there and wonder why you can't get the stuff smooth. The water washes Installment #2-a  Using Filler away the debris and keeps the cutting surface fresh. It extends the life of the abrasive paper.

      Here is a quick repair of a sink hole on the front surface of the engine.



      The first thing I do is take a round bur and slightly deepen and roughen the defect. I also round the edges so the material can feather out much easier.



      I then wash the area well and let dry. I add my filler making sure I have good contact between my material and the plastic. In this case I'm using a hard dental wax for the sake of time. The handling principles are the same.



      The part is allowed to set and is trimmed. In this case with wax, my abrasive is different "grits" of nylon fabric and silk.

      Here are the results.



      Next, we finish our prep and start to lay down some paint.
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  1. robjos32's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    robert
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    I'm really hooked on this tutorial, as it provides the information and answers in easy to understand language.

    I cant't wait for the next installment.
    You can have any color you want, as long as it's black. Henry Ford
    QUOTE QUOTE #2

  2. hot ford coupe's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Jeffrey
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    Thanks Rob. Next, we're going to paint the block and learn to use metalizer Installment #2-a  Using Filler .


    Installment #2-a  Using Filler
    Sometimes a handful of patience is worth more than a truck load of brains. Have the courage to trust your own beliefs. Don't be swayed by those with louder voices. W.S. Maugham :)
    QUOTE QUOTE #3

  3. Deuces-wild's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    l:l:l:
    Be nice or else ~1~**
    QUOTE QUOTE #4

  4. slingshot's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Just going through these and these are some great tutorials, excellent work!

    I ran across this tip on another site, it’s for applying modeling putty Installment #2-a  Using Filler and ending up with almost no shaping, sanding Installment #2-a  Using Filler , or cleanup afterwards.
    http://www.aircraftresourcecenter.co...ing/tnt029.htm
    QUOTE QUOTE #5

  5. Rick's Avatar Member
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    Rick
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    Wow, thats great information!
    QUOTE QUOTE #6

  6. Deuces-wild's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Guido
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    Great stuff Slingshot!! I saved that one in my files.
    Be nice or else ~1~**
    QUOTE QUOTE #7

  7. hot ford coupe's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Jeffrey
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    Thanks Slingshot. That's a really great tip for tight areas where a lot of sanding Installment #2-a  Using Filler can destroy your fine detail. Keep the suggestions coming. The more info we can get, the better we can become as modelers and the better the models get. Don't hesitate to jump in wherever you want. You never need to ask anyone for permission.


    Installment #2-a  Using Filler
    Sometimes a handful of patience is worth more than a truck load of brains. Have the courage to trust your own beliefs. Don't be swayed by those with louder voices. W.S. Maugham :)
    QUOTE QUOTE #8

  8. Don Garrett's Avatar Asst. Administrator
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    Don
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    I'm gonna' have to try this one myself......if it works as well as it's described, someone deserves a cookie. emot16
    Grandpa McGurk.....Steppin' Large and Livin' easy.
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    QUOTE QUOTE #9

  9. EstebanLoco's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Steve
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    great stuff Jeff. I use regular automotive Bondo just because I am comfortable mixing and applying it. Of course I only use filler after I have exhausted all other means - that is, I try and file or sand Installment #2-a  Using Filler a seam or depression to where it requires no filler. Most of the deuce parts are made from very (overly) thick plastic which allows you some room for shaping.

    Keep up the great tutorials.

    Stevie
    [I]I'm just a soul whose intentions are good . . .

    "A picture is worth a thousand words, but a model is worth a thousand pictures." Harley Earl[/I]
    QUOTE QUOTE #10

  10. ScaleMotorcars's Avatar Administrator
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    Daniel
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    Now this looks like an easy video tut. Anyone up for it? emot2
    QUOTE QUOTE #11

  11. hot ford coupe's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Jeffrey
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    I'll start working on it. I think I get out of the hopital on Friday. Let me see how mobile I am the first week and then I should know when I can put it out.


    Installment #2-a  Using Filler
    Sometimes a handful of patience is worth more than a truck load of brains. Have the courage to trust your own beliefs. Don't be swayed by those with louder voices. W.S. Maugham :)
    QUOTE QUOTE #12

  12. slingshot's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Quote Originally Posted by hot ford coupe View Post
    I'll start working on it. I think I get out of the hopital on Friday. Let me see how mobile I am the first week and then I should know when I can put it out.
    Hope everything goes good at the hospital and after you get home! I just had surgery 1 ˝ months ago that didn’t go very good. Laid up a lot but unfortunately in to much pain to work on the models much.
    QUOTE QUOTE #13

  13. hot ford coupe's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Jeffrey
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    I know that feeling slingshot. My last surgery was 9 weeks ago and I couldn't do more than about 30 minutes work without having to get up. Lots of pain. This time, it went a little better.


    Installment #2-a  Using Filler
    Sometimes a handful of patience is worth more than a truck load of brains. Have the courage to trust your own beliefs. Don't be swayed by those with louder voices. W.S. Maugham :)
    QUOTE QUOTE #14

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