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    1. Kit: , by (VIP/Sponsor) hot ford coupe is offline
      Builder Last Online: Mar 2021 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/8 Rating:  Thanks: 0
      Started: 02-05-07 Build Revisions: Never  
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      Here's your second installment for the box stock Installment #2 - Part Preparation deuce which from now on we'll call the B-deuce. I must make a correction from the last installment where I made a booboo. I said that you could start adding other parts while the main glue joint was setting so you wouldn't have to stop building, As of right now, you can't add any other parts until the block is painted, so I hope I haven't messed up anyone's work. If you have already glued parts to the unpainted block, don't worry. With some creative masking Installment #2 - Part Preparation , it can be easily corrected. If you want to do something else while the glue sets, just start preparing your next parts for the nexts steps. This installment lets you know how.

      Many of the parts that we'll need to add to the engine like the tranny, the oil pan, the exhaust and the cover that goes under the intake manifold must go through its own preparation before they can be added to the block which in many cases will involve dechroming so you don't have to worry about repairing the kit chrome. Rechroming and metal finishing will be discussed when we get to the painting step. As I was pa\reparing my own parts for painting, I discovered a large number of negative factors staring me in the face which if I neglected this whole tutorial would be a waste of good band width. In the last thread, we mentioned the defects we get when we tried to put the raw pieces together, but we also don't want to forget the defects that come with the individual parts themselves. Believe me, there are tons of them and they all significantly detract from our quality.

      Many builders usually ask "what's the big deal? You'll never see it anyway". The main problems with that philosophy are 1) you'll never know you won't see it until you hae this glaring defect right in front of your eyes and then it's too late to correct it; 2)speaking for myself, if I become too selective with the defects,i.e. I'll fix this one but I'll ignore that one, I'll have a greater tendency to rush the work, get lazy and become sloppy missing other critical problems down the road; and 3) many of these uncorrected defects, when the parts are painted and polished or they're chrome parts, will give your model that unmistakable toy quality look that's the kiss of death to a museum quality model. The trouble is, you'll never know why. Don't forget that being incredibly picky with all these so called minor defects in the beginning will sharpen your eye along your progress as a modeler. After a while, you'll be able to pick up and correct the defects much more easily. You simply won't be able to leave them uncorrected.

      The most common defects we all know are 1) the mold lines Installment #2 - Part Preparation , 2) the round raised cirlcles from mold marks, and of course 3) flash Installment #2 - Part Preparation . We all have seen the correction methods for these defects on other model sites and that is to remove them and smooth out the part either with sandpaper, files or scraping Installment #2 - Part Preparation with a knife blade, also called adzing used for gross material removal before finishing. Those however are not the only details we need to pay attention to and I'm finding all of them as I try to get through this build.

      First is the sink mark or sink hole as I like to call it. These are usually found where the plastic changes from thin to thick and back to thin again. You can see this around where the locator pegs are, for example.



      Here's the underside.



      The reason for the sinking or better described as shrinkage is because hot Installment #2 - Part Preparation plastic shrinks as it cools and it always shrinks toward the area of greatest bulk or thickness. This is good to know also when you master parts for casting Installment #2 - Part Preparation because casting Installment #2 - Part Preparation resin Installment #2 - Part Preparation will do the same thing. hThere are two ways to correct this defect. One is to sand Installment #2 - Part Preparation it out if it's relatively shallow and won't ruin your part. To see this defect better, take a plat rigid file or sand Installment #2 - Part Preparation stick and lightly sand Installment #2 - Part Preparation the area around the defect. If you have a sink hole, you'll see a shiny spot. When the shine is gone, so is your defect. The second method is used when you know you can't sand Installment #2 - Part Preparation out the defect because it is too extensive or deep. Here, you fill it with your favorite material of choice. In my case, I use a two part putty Installment #2 - Part Preparation because it doesn't shrink, it sets pretty quick and hard and is very smooth when you get done with it. Depending on the defect, I may even glue in pieces of styrene Installment #2 - Part Preparation as a filler, but it has to set for a much longer time. I'll talk a bit more on fillers Installment #2 - Part Preparation in an added post after this main part has been posted. Hang it there.

      Our second defect is the distortion of the flat surfaces like we see with the Pontiac's oil pan. It comes from the same mechanism, plastic shrinking towards the corner edges of the part which are actually thicker. I removed the chrome from the pan and purposely left the yellow undercoating. I then took my rigid file and worked the entire surface. This is what I saw.



      You can see where the high spots are and where the file never touched. If you don't correct this, your part won't reflect light like the real part giving it the toy look and worse, if you're polishing your part, you'll run a greater risk of sanding Installment #2 - Part Preparation right through the paint on the high spots leaving thin areas, exposed primer Installment #2 - Part Preparation or worse, exposed plastic. This is particularly murder when you've just set down a gorgeous candy or transluscent pearl Installment #2 - Part Preparation finish on the part or the body and your high spots show up much lighter than the rest of your part or you wind up with dark blotches. Just ask the guys who shoot candy finishes on real cars how this makes you feel. The correction for this defect is the same as the sink hole. Sand Installment #2 - Part Preparation and/or fill the area. Then paint or metalize.

      The third defect involves the edges of the parts Frequently they have a thin, sharp raised edge like this





      This little stinker along with defect #2 really toys up the look. The edges are easily corrected by filing, sanding Installment #2 - Part Preparation or careful adzing and smoothing.

      The fourth defect will be encountered later on in the build but will just briefly be mentioned here. One thing that can really throw off the eye is to have door, hood and trunk lines that are too wide.


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  1. hot ford coupe's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Jeffrey
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    Continued---

    Gluing Installment #2 - Part Preparation on strip styrene Installment #2 - Part Preparation and careful fitting does the trick. I'll be describing this in more detail when we get to opening the doors and trunk.

    The fifth defect, and this is one reason why you do such careful research is where the parts are either too big or too small or just plain wrong. This requires careful part trimming with files and sand Installment #2 - Part Preparation sticks, a Dremel Installment #2 - Part Preparation and maybe even minor scratchbuilding. We'll tackle this one together when we get to it.

    The last defect we'll discuss at this time are the minute surface defects that result from scratches, gouges and other imperfections in the mold surfaces thameselves. They show up as raised lines, bumps and circles. You can really see them when you hold the part up to the light and turn it so you get different reflections off the surface . This is especially important when you go to lay down your perfect paint layers. Nothing ruins a paint job worse than a poorly or unprepared surface especially if you're trying to get a chrome like finish. In fact, most problems builders experience when they do paint, comes not from the paint but from what's under it. As paint dries, it also shrinks and it shrinks right down into all the defects and magnifies them. You can try all you want to get rid of them but all you do is ruin your work. The solution here is to sand Installment #2 - Part Preparation each critical part before painting from about 400 grit down to about 800 or 1000 grit wet dry paper. That you can easily get at Wal-Mart. Now you guys know why it takes me so long to complete a model. With all this gloom and doom, you'd think that the quality of the R/M deuce is not good. In fact it's a really great quality model. If you want a really wild time, try a Pocher kit which has the reputation of poor fitting parts.

    You must remember that a manufactured model kit is like a suit you buy off the rack. The suit is well made and it fits o.k. but although it costs an arm and a leg, it hangs on you like the proverbial cheap suit. What does the fitter do? If he really knows his business and is very quality minded, he alters the jacket and the pants according to the individual shapes of the customers. You stand on a little step looking like a moron getting stuck in the legs with little pins. There's chalk dust everywhere. The fitting process takes up half your day and a bunch of seemingly useless measurements. Then you'll have to wait at least for 3 weeks to get your suit back. However when you put that suit on, it looks totally custom made and like a million dollar suit. You look great. It then becomes well worth the price. You as the kit builder are the fitter. You can either take that raw suit and make a master piece out of it or not. The reasons and the choice are only up to the builder. A bit later tonight under this same thread, we'll talk about fillers Installment #2 - Part Preparation .


    Installment #2 - Part Preparation
    Sometimes a handful of patience is worth more than a truck load of brains. Have the courage to trust your own beliefs. Don't be swayed by those with louder voices. W.S. Maugham :)
    QUOTE QUOTE #2

  2. robjos32's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    I eagerly await the next installment.
    You can have any color you want, as long as it's black. Henry Ford
    QUOTE QUOTE #3

  3. j_nigrelli's Avatar Active Member
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    proving that good modelling skills have no scale, i am thoroughly enjoying this series of posts - thread.

    while i haven't quite mustered the wherewithal to jump into yet another scale [i build 1/24-25, 1/48 model rr & HO] nor have the financial acumen to support said vice, i am getting a great deal of information and eagerly await the next installment.
    QUOTE QUOTE #4

  4. hot ford coupe's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Thanks guys. Your absolutely right, j. Scale really doesn't matter at this point. Which model we're doing doesn't even matter as well. The same principles apply to all scalesall kits and, even other materials. It's not so much the handling of each individual part, but it's the approach to each subject that is the point. In other words, these so called lessons aren't meant to show "this is what you do for the deuce engine, this is what you do for the deuce oil pan and so on". You apply each principle to each part for each subject you model. No one will need a tutorial for the box stock Installment #2 - Part Preparation T because the approach is exactly the same.


    Installment #2 - Part Preparation
    Sometimes a handful of patience is worth more than a truck load of brains. Have the courage to trust your own beliefs. Don't be swayed by those with louder voices. W.S. Maugham :)
    QUOTE QUOTE #5

  5. Rick's Avatar Member
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    Rick
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    Jeff, this is GOOD stuff. We can ALL learn from this tutorial and its greatly appreciated.

    Rick
    QUOTE QUOTE #6

  6. hot ford coupe's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Thanks guys. It's all to promote the best models we could make.


    Installment #2 - Part Preparation
    Sometimes a handful of patience is worth more than a truck load of brains. Have the courage to trust your own beliefs. Don't be swayed by those with louder voices. W.S. Maugham :)
    QUOTE QUOTE #7

  7. Deuces-wild's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    l:l:l:l:
    Be nice or else ~1~**
    QUOTE QUOTE #8

  8. robjos32's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    The next installment of this tutorial is eagerly awaited.
    You can have any color you want, as long as it's black. Henry Ford
    QUOTE QUOTE #9

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