PDA

View Full Version : Article: 1/12 Scale 1869 Allerton Steam Pumper



Pages : 1 [2]

gbritnell
08-28-13, 07:25 AM
Hi Ken,
Although I'm mostly an automotive model fan I would have to say that this surpasses the T by quite a bit. It looks like your machining skills have improved immensely, that's not to say that your fabrication work hasn't. I kind of pity the poor fellow that has to take it apart to make all the masters from it.
gbritnell

xken
08-28-13, 09:15 AM
George, Thank you for your comments; in many respects this subject is more of a challenge being 1/12th scale rather than 1/8th. Yes the skills are improving but the credit really goes to Sherline's lathe and its precision tolerance; I am able to machine parts now I never could on the Central 8 x 10.

That poor SOB will be me; once built I will then have to completely disassemble and package up the parts and document for casting and photo etching and laser cutting. Then once parts are received back from the caster develop the assembly instructions which is almost as challenging as the build.

Talked with Walt this morning and the new show at Stan Hywet is in the works and they are interested in having the Model Show there much like Glenmoor Gathering was. Hopefully I will know more next week. Sounds like they want top quality models and will be by invitation only. Stay tuned.

Have a great day!

Ken 1gramps1

xken
08-28-13, 11:00 AM
George, here is one reason I like the Sherline lathe. I can set up three cutting tools at the same time for doing the small multiple items like this valve knob. I know you are an extremely talented machinist; but this is more for the benefit of the less experienced builders like myself still in the learning process of using the machines and their capabilities.

Here is the three way set up I am using right now to make the small knobs and petcocks.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/ASP_Valve_Knob_02.jpg

Here is a closer look.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/ASP_Valve_Knob_01.jpg

Here is the finished knob parted off and ready to install.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/ASP_Valve_Knob_03.jpg

Now to make more.

Ken 1gramps1

GusSMHDV
08-28-13, 06:39 PM
Ken1thumbup1.......besides the thanks for taking the time to photo and document your methods and techniques and post them for our enjoyment and education, I would like to thank you for the very detailed instructions on how you built the light and the torches. Absolutely astounding work.

Thanks1clap1......Gus

xken
08-29-13, 11:35 AM
Gus, thank you for your feedback! Knowledge not shared is a waste of one's efforts. I am glad to hear you are enjoying the build.

Here I have finished up the valve knobs (4) the top one is a different design than the bottom three which are similar; but all are the same size diameter. I am sure that there must have been a good reason to make the top one different than the rest; it has a squared edge versus a beveled/rounded edge.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/ASP_Valve_Knob_04.jpg

Next I moved on to the boiler pressure gauge. First I turned the gauge to the needed shape, then drilled a 1/32" hole in the bottom to receive the connecting pipe works. Once drilled the gauge back was filed to fit the contour of the boiler.

Next I used a 1/8" hex bar and turned the plumbing connection pipe works. The round ball shape is a petcock and the two step hex is a union joint. The pipe part is 1 inch in length and still attached to the parent hex rod for additional drilling and soldering operations.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/ASP_Boiler_gauge_01.jpg

Here the ball petcock was drilled 1/32" hole to receive the petcock handle. The handle started with a 3/32" rod and was turned down to a 1/32" shaft to be inserted into the ball hole. The turned shaft was then annealed and the finger grip end hammered to a flat shape using a small drift punch and then filed to the finished shape. It was inserted into the hole and a small tube section added for the opposite side detail and all soldered in place. Once cleaned it was cut from the parent hex rod; which up to this point was used as a holding handle.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/ASP_Boiler_gauge_02.jpg

Here the finished gauge was added to the boiler.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/ASP_Boiler_gauge_03.jpg


Now for more ball valves and petcocks and handles.

Ken 1gramps1

5thwheel
08-29-13, 04:57 PM
Ken, as usual beautiful work. 1clap1 I don't see any nozzles on the valves. These valves are for checking the water/steam level in the boiler. The same use as the sight glass. However these petcocks would be used in case of glass breakage. These are more reliable than the sight glass. The glass shows the liquid of water but does not show the steam saturation of the water. If the valve is opened and it sprays out a stream of water, OK, but if it sprays out in a fan shape it indicates steam saturation and the water level is too low. I am surprised they have metal handles as even the wooden and fiber handles get almost too hot to handle.

Bill

spinellid82
08-29-13, 08:46 PM
"Now for more ball valves and petcocks and handles."


OH MY!

xken
08-30-13, 01:25 PM
William, thank you for the explanation of their use. Now some things make sense like the petcocks at the top and bottom of the sight gauge.
As for the nozzles I think you are referring to this. One of the challenges I have in documenting is knowing how many pictures to include without getting carried away or boring people.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/ASP_Valve_Knob_06.jpg

Here is another view from the rear; the "nozzles" are angled down and to the rear and they are all metal.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/ASP_Valve_Knob_07.jpg

There are another couple of "mystery valves" and once I add them please feel free to comment on their use. I think they have to do with venting when adding water and to drain the water from the boiler.

Again thanks for the explanation. 1thumbup1

Ken 1gramps1

5thwheel
08-30-13, 05:42 PM
Spot on Kenneth, The two valves on the glass are to isolate the glass and the petcock on it is for bleeding the glass. Beautiful valves, that is what makes scale modeling a challenge and satisfying. Especially in 1/12th.

Bill

KURTVD19
08-31-13, 11:10 AM
Ken:
Regarding the top valve on the boiler to the left of the sight glass having a different profile on the handale than the other 3 - I am retired from the fire department and until 1984 I was an Engineer and drove the vehicle and operated the pump. We had different types of handles on some valves so that we could operate them by feel - a sort of safety in case you meant to operate a different valve and were distracted by seeing something that took your focus away from the pump. My actual firefighting days ended in August of 84 when I was crushed under a falling industrial garage door - after 2 years of therapy I was able to resume working for the FD but as Chief of Fire Prevention, retiring in 1997. So, after 29 years I don't quite remember which valves we had the different handles on but that's what I think they might have been doing here. Or else, the original handle was damaged and this was the replacement handle they used.
I am working on my first model in 1/12th scale and I like it a lot due to the detail I am able to incorporate. The other day I made up the porthole for the cabin of the sailboat I am working on and used your lamination technique from your book to make up the different thicknesses of the porthole. Until I read your book I was at a loss as to how I was going to mill out the porthole being oval rather than round. I am by no means a machinist but your layering technique showed me a way to do this that worked quite well.
Here is a photo of the porthole and the clock and barometer on the front bulkhead of the cabin before being installed into the model.
24467

Here it is in place inside the model before the cabin roof is made up and put in place. Once the roof is on the only way to see this bulkhead and the porthole will be through the rear hatchway and there will be little lighting as the model will be cased and on display in the WI Maritime Museum in Manitowoc, WI.
24468
Thanks for writing the book - it has helped me already.
Kurt

xken
08-31-13, 01:09 PM
Power finally back on; we were without power for four hours this morning perhaps another suicide squirrel in a transformer again.

Kurt, thanks for the explanation. I guessed that the profile was different for that reason of tactile difference in working at night. The top one is squared while the lower three are the same. Glad to hear the book is helping and the work is looking great.

Here I have added a section of pipe with a valve knob and two 90 degree elbows. It just comes out of the boiler above the gauge and then returns back in above the first band into the flat area. I thought that this might be for venting air when filling the boiler with water.
Perhaps William knows the real purpose for it.

The elbows were formed from annealed rod with slip rings soldered in place for the flanges. The straights and ball valve were turned from hex bar as well as the shoulder for the valve knob. Just small fussy stuff that makes the difference in quality.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/ASP_Pipe_01.jpg

Ken 1gramps1

5thwheel
08-31-13, 01:52 PM
It is new to me Ken, only a guess. It for sure comes out in the high steam area of the boiler. My guess is that it goes back in above the top boiler plate and flues. May have something to do with the air draft out the stack. On steam donkeys and locomotives the exhaust steam was piped to the smoke stack to aid in the draft and to dilute the smoke. That is why you see the engine smoke puffing rather than a steady stream of smoke. This pipe is too small for that and it only comes from the top of the steam chamber to the stack. Or it could be to stop the live cinders exiting the flues when coal is added to the furnace. A coal fire has a tendency to form a crust on top and has to be broken up often with a poker. When that is done, live cinders exit the stack. One of the problems with steam operated fire engines was that they sometimes started more fires than they put out. The live cinders would land on adjacent roofs. It was a real problem with logging donkeys in the woods. Many of them had to have elaborate screens to catch the cinders. Those are the fun details that make a model. They could be left out and very few people would know they were missing.

Bill

xken
08-31-13, 05:11 PM
William, I can only imagine the sight these must have been coming at you at full gallop with smoke and sparks trailing behind. This will have a domed screen inside the stack which was the spark arrester you mentioned.

Here is what I think is the boiler water drain valve based upon its size and location at the bottom. First I turned the main body out of hex rod with the standoff and locating pin included. Then I turned the handle stem and left it attached to the parent rod so I could hold it in the locating hole during soldering. This shows it soldered in place but not yet cut from the main hex bar. The turned handle will index and be soldered to the stem once cut off.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/ASP_Drain_Valve_01.jpg

Here the handle is soldered in place and ready for installation. Note the hex nut was also soldered on the stem and then filed down to the proper size.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/ASP_Drain_Valve_02.jpg

Here it is installed on the boiler. The rear wheel was removed to install.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/ASP_Drain_Valve_03.jpg

While the rear wheel was off I took advantage of it's removal and took a picture of the right side with all the parts in place. This must have been the main operating side with the gauges and knobs all on this side.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/ASP_Drain_Valve_04.jpg

Back to making more ball valves; at least two more.

Ken 1gramps1

spinellid82
09-02-13, 11:43 AM
Well, here I go again...WOW!

xken
09-03-13, 05:42 PM
Here is the water drain valve mounted on the rear of the water pump box. It has a bit of a bend in it to avoid the pump arm travel.
Again started with hex rod and turned accordingly.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/ASP_Water_pump_valve_01.jpg

Here it is mounted in place.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/ASP_Water_pump_valve_02.jpg

Here is a lower steam drain (?) mounted on the lower center of the boiler. There is a small petcock on the lower elbow. Here you can get an idea of how I made it with various bits of brass and it was a bit tricky soldering. There is an offset to avoid the left chain attachment point when in place.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/ASP_Boiler_Drain_Valve_01.jpg

Here it is in place.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/ASP_Boiler_Drain_Valve_02.jpg

Here is the brass ball that is the travel limit stop for the shock absorber. These were added once the shock was assembled though the support bracket.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/ASP_Rear_Shock_01.jpg

Back to more pieces parts.

Ken 1gramps1

spinellid82
09-04-13, 07:48 AM
1nworthy11nworthy11nworthy1

xken
09-04-13, 03:18 PM
I moved on to the boiler grab bar at the back of the boiler which the boiler man held onto while on the way to the fire. I started by annealing a 3/32" rod and forming it to match the curvature of the boiler then bent the ends as needed. I then set the ends on the steel plate edge and hammered each flat using the hammer first and then a drift punch.

I then adjusted the flattened ends to conform to the boiler surface using needle nose pliers. I then soldered a 00-90 washer in place then drilled and taped the holes to receive 00-90 bolts. I then sawed off the excess flattened area and filed to match the washer; then soldered the bolts in place and trimmed the bolt ends shorter.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/ASP_Boiler_Grab_Bar_01.jpg

Here is the grab bar in place.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/ASP_Boiler_Grab_Bar_02.jpg

Next I turned down the acrylic rod and cut the front beveled lens for the carbide lamps. Then continued turning the rod to the diameter needed for the side lenses to match the brass frame. Here is the setup getting ready to part off to the length needed to press fit in the lamp. I polished the front and side surfaces will still in the lathe using a Q-tip (cotton bud) soaked in water with polishing compound. Acrylic rod is great for making headlights or gauge lens for instruments; but a lathe is needed.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/ASP_Light_Lens_01.jpg

Here is the milling machine set up to saw the desired side lenses; 1/8" down from the top surface.. Note the parting cut was cut to the depth of the saw cut. I am using a .025" x 3" diameter saw blade in the mill. Even at a slow speed you can see the plastic build up from the heat generated by the blade.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/ASP_Light_Lens_02.jpg

Here are the lenses press fit in place on the lamp.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/ASP_Light_Lens_03.jpg

Now to cut the second set of side lenses.

Ken 1gramps1

Giovanni
09-05-13, 12:24 AM
Aren't there supposed to be LED lighting inside?

xken
09-05-13, 07:08 AM
Giovanni, that would have been nice except these are hand held and removable. Good idea! 1thumbup1

Ken

spinellid82
09-05-13, 10:10 AM
Ken, it is very tricky put works great...flame polishing. The Guy who use to run my local Tap Plastics store taught me how to use a torch to polish acrylic years ago. Get it as good as you can with abrasives then use a small, concentrated flame to bring it to perfection. Use the very tip of the flame and move quickly...on a few pieces of scrap first.

xken
09-05-13, 12:47 PM
David, Thanks I am also familiar with flame polishing as well, the challenge is the size of the parts and how to hold them since both sides have to be clear and they are only 1/16" thick. The lenses I have will probably be used as masters to make molds to produce the parts for the kit.

Thanks again for thinking of it. 1thumbup1

Ken

xken
09-08-13, 07:21 AM
The list keeps getting shorter of parts to build. Here are the drain petcocks for the steam and water boxes.
This one is the steam box and I still have to make 4 more of a different design than this that will go to the front and rear of each cylinder in this unit.
http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/ASP_Steam_Box_Drain_01.jpg

Here is the water box drain; made using four different parts soldered together.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/ASP_Water_Box_Drain_01.jpg

Here it is in place.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/ASP_Water_Box_Drain_02.jpg

I think that all the variations were for tactical recognition at night so one could feel for the correct valve by touch. I did not know that there were so many different ways to do petcocks and knobs.

Ken 1gramps1

spinellid82
09-08-13, 02:08 PM
Absolutely beautiful Ken! Your attention to detail is spectacular.

xken
09-10-13, 07:21 AM
The picture upload is not working this morning.

Ken

KURTVD19
09-10-13, 08:31 PM
And here I was looking for my daily fix for my brass building addiction! I missed it Ken. Thanks for the postings.
Kurt

xken
09-11-13, 08:54 AM
Kurt it looks like it is working again; here is your fix. he1he

These are the coal bin buckets that I am told is where tools and live coals to start the boiler went. Coals were brought from the fire house stove to start the boiler fire.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/ASP_Buckets.jpg

Here are the last of the petcocks that are located at the bottom of the steam box to drain in front and behind the steam cylinders. The location holes for these will be drilled once the unit is disassembled. This shows the 4 parts that comprise each petcock.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/ASP_Petcocks_01.jpg

Here is a view of the completed petcock ready to install. Since this will be a static model the handle does not turn as I have done on other models. The conical shape is the drain outlet.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/ASP_Petcocks_03.jpg

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/ASP_Petcocks_02.jpg

I am now moving on to the hose nozzles of which there will be eight in total 4 male and 4 female. Due to the casting constraints the females will not be threaded internally. For the hoses I am trying to track down some 5/16" or 3/8" flat athletic shoe laces with a fine weave. So far most that I have found are 1/4" or 1/2" and some what of a course weave.

Glad to see the image loader is working again. 1thumbup1

Ken

5thwheel
09-11-13, 10:42 AM
Beautiful work Ken, I keep repeating my self it seems yet there isn't that many words that mean the same but be assured the appreciation is still as strong.

These petcocks are a nice touch, probably most people would not notice it if they were left off. The petcocks on the cylinder heads are for draining the water as you say. These engines are double acting which means the steam alternates from one end of the piston to the other via a valve. When a steam engine is cold at start up the steam condenses in the cylinder forming a cushion rather than exhausting which puts pressure on the piston preventing it from moving its complete stroke. The petcocks are opened until the engine is running well and good steam comes out of the petcock.

spinellid82
09-11-13, 11:09 AM
Like William said, I feel like I repeat myself a lot responding to your posts Ken but all I can think to say is "WOW!"

xken
09-12-13, 10:34 AM
Here are the 8 hose nozzles for each end of the 4 hoses. These will not be threaded due to casting constraints of the internal threading. I am going to see if I can locate a 1/4 -32 die to cut the threads on the male ends. I have 1/4 - 28 but still a little course.
http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/ASP_Nozzles_01.jpg

Here is an experimental test to make the hose out of brass if I cannot find a suitable alternative material like a shoe lace. This is a section of 5/16" brass that was very slowly turned on the lathe with a sharp pointed tool and fast turning of the lead screw to achieve the texture. I may not be able to do this the entire 10" needed consistently.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/ASP_Nozzles_02.jpg

Here is the test in place on the front support bracket. The other challenge is that after turning the tube was annealed and the hammer forming damages the now softened texture. AHHH... the joys of scratch building.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/ASP_Nozzles_03.jpg

A second hose would also have to rest up on the first one as well.

Ken 1gramps1

Egon
09-12-13, 05:06 PM
An idea, You must go to the library and find a book on how to make rope/thread braid on a tube, and a varnish coating to seal it.
Search web for: Polyester Expandable braided insulated sleeve/hose/tube, in many collors

KURTVD19
09-12-13, 05:11 PM
Ken:
The nozzles and couplings look great. The fire hose looks great too.

However, this type of hose would not be carried on the brackets of the pumper. Rather, hard suction hose would be carried on the pumper with the fire hose being carried on the hose cart/wagon. Your lead photo of the series shows hard suction hoses on the pumper.

The hose used by the pumper to supply the fire pump with water from a pond, cistern or low pressure hydrant of the day had to be hard to resist the suction from the pump collapsing the hose.

Forgive me if you just draped the hose on the bracket for illustration purposes.

Kurt

xken
09-12-13, 06:15 PM
Kurt,
The lead photo is from the museum and I have since learned that the suction hoses are incorrect and are there for props only. They are 5" and the correct ones should have been 3" per the valves on the water box and nozzle mounted behind the boiler. Since this was a city pumper it must have carried the hoses in the brackets and hooked up to hydrants in town. Here is a period photo showing the hoses in place as I am building it now. The hard suction hose would have been much easier to model.

Here is the period photo I am using now for reference. I also have found another period photo that shows a whip holder mounted on the right side of the driver seat which is also missing from the museum example.

Thanks for sharing your knowledge on these machines, I am learning quite a bit myself and I have been asked to be a guest speaker with the model on the 21st for a group in town. I am apparently now more knowledgeable about it than anyone at the museum.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/Pumper_Photo_01.jpg

By the way I have found some shoe laces that will work and may post pictures of hoses tomorrow.

Thanks again! Ken 1gramps1

xken
09-12-13, 06:23 PM
Egon,

Thanks for the idea however, I have found Kiwi classic flat shoe laces that I am using. I am gluing open the cut ends so as not fray,n will explain tomorrow with pictures.

Thanks again! 1thumbup1

Ken 1gramps1

xken
09-13-13, 12:05 PM
Here is the sequence for the hoses. I did find some shoe laces that would do for the build that I mentioned above. I learned far more than I ever wanted to about shoe laces and the different types that are available.

First I rough cut the laces 1/2" longer than I needed and then mixed up a mixture of 2/3 white glue and 1/3 water and mixed thoroughly. Then using a Q-tip (cotton bud) I soaked about 1/4" of the cut ends with the mixture and then opened up the soaked end while still wet with the end of a paint brush so the two surfaces would not glue together and set all aside and allowed to dry. Once dry; and you will notice that the solution wicks down the lace about another 1/2" from when solution was applied, using sharp scissors I cut the ends off. The solution prevents the ends from fraying and distorting. This step is very critical to do first.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/ASP_Hoses_001.jpg

Once the ends were dry and cut I used the end of the brush again to slowing open the ends to receive the tapered end of the nozzles and CA'ed them in place.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/ASP_Hoses_02.jpg

Once all the nozzles dried in place I then laid the hoses flat on wax paper and soaked both sides of the hose the full length and tamped off the excess solution using a paper towel. Then using large spring clips on both end nozzles hung them off the bench to dry vertically. This enabled the weight of the spring clip hanging down to stretch the weave and make it a little less course appearing and the solution stiffened the hose when dry.

Then once the hoses were dry and stiff they were re-soaked again and the ends formed approximately at the bracket sizes with the nozzles ends resting on a flat surface and the center of the hose resting on a plastic bag so the glue solution would not stick to it. These were allowed to dry overnight.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/ASP_Hoses_01.jpg

Once completely dry the hoses were then carefully formed using just fingers to fit over the brackets and shape the sag. This will be done a couple of times since the stiff hoses still retain a little memory from resting on the plastic. Patience is needed here. I first formed the lower ones and then the top ones and they will be fussed with more over the next couple of days to overcome the memory issue.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/ASP_Hoses_03.jpg

Here is an overall view of the unit nearly completed at this point. I need to make the rear boiler shield name plate, seat cushion, whip holder with whip and a few acorn nuts. But for all practical purposes this is how the completed model will appear minus the painted parts. The metal masters for casting cannot be painted.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/ASP_Hoses_04.jpg

Now back to work.

Ken 1gramps1

Giovanni
09-13-13, 12:33 PM
Brilliant method for making the hoses!

xken
09-14-13, 11:37 AM
While looking for laces I saw some crochet thread that I thought would be good for the non-slip grip for the nozzles. Here is a test wrap on one for now. This is what will be done for the cast parts when I get them for the proof of production build. It was also good that I remembered my Boy Scout knotting skills to use a lashing slip knot to minimize the appearance.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/ASP_Nozzles_04.jpg

Here is the nozzle in place as well as the nameplate shield on the rear of the boiler. This will be a photo etched part with the text on it.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/ASP_Nozzles_05.jpg

Now back to more pieces parts.

Ken 1gramps1

KURTVD19
09-14-13, 05:02 PM
Ken:
The hoses and nozzles look great.
Kurt

BrassBuilder
09-14-13, 11:29 PM
Here is an overall view of the unit nearly completed at this point.
Ken 1gramps1

What project is next for the workbench? The Jag? Been enjoying this build, but looking forward to the Jag again too.

Mike

xken
09-15-13, 07:42 AM
Mike, yes the jag is on hold and Model expo wants me to do a series of Fire Fighting apparatus. Next will be a Ladder Wagon and then a Hose Cart to compliment the Allerton, both of which are also at the Wayne County Historical Society here in Wooster, Ohio.

Here are the whip holder and whip which were attached to the right side of the driver's seat and angled out and to the rear so as not to interfere with arms holding the reins and the whip in its holder. The holder was bored and turned with the bracket and rivet heads soldered on.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/ASP_Whip_Holder_01.jpg

Here is an overall with the whip in the holder as well as the seat cushion which was cut and shaped from a 1/4" thick piece of brass.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/ASP_Whip_Holder_02.jpg

Here is a close up of the seat cushion. Not very fancy at all, but considering no front suspension I am sure was helpful on rough roads. This will be painted leather color in the kit.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/ASP_Seat_Cushion_01.jpg

Now I have to make the 4 retaining straps for the hose support brackets and few acorn nuts and the prototype will be completed. I have ordered the gasket material for the tires on the wheels and fine screen mesh for the smoke stack spark arrestor.

Ken 1gramps1

xken
09-16-13, 01:53 PM
Here is the first of the hose retaining straps I will have to make three more now that I sorted the first one out. Had to do a little research in the fire engine book I have with a magnifying glass on the old black and white photos and this is what they had; short leather straps.

I started with 1/8" wide strips annealed for forming and used 1/32" rod for the buckle and tang. These are indexed on the pins on the bracket. Here is a close up.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/ASP_Hose_Straps_01.jpg

Here is an overall.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/ASP_Hose_Straps_02.jpg

I also finished up the needed acorn nuts and these straps are the last parts needed to finish up the build then the documentation and CAD drawing starts.

Ken 1gramps1

keramh
09-16-13, 03:37 PM
even the leather straps of brass? Why did you not also braided hoses made ​​of brass wire?
I do not always praise, why such senseless thoughts from me. 1what11wthe1he1hegringrin

xken
09-17-13, 02:18 PM
Marek, I did not weave them because they have to be reproduced by casting for a kit. I did look at a brass alternative but it was not practical or effective.

Here are what I think are now the last parts to be fabricated. They are the caps for the water intake and outlet valves. These are not on the sample at the museum but can be seen in the period photo that I posted earlier.

Here are the intake ones on the front that the hose (s) to the hydrant would have been hooked up to.
http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/ASP_Caps_01.jpg

Here are the ones on the outlet valve to the hose that the fireman would use. Then is another on the left side.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/ASP_Caps_02.jpg

Next I will start to draw up the graphics for the various gauges and nameplate shield and then onto part drawings and plans in CAD.

Ken 1gramps1

jfonticobal
09-17-13, 02:40 PM
I love this masterpiece

spinellid82
09-17-13, 05:07 PM
Stunning Ken!

xken
09-18-13, 09:08 AM
The 1869 Allerton Steam Pumper prototype is completed. gringrin

Here is a sequence of various views.

Right side view.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/ASP_Finished_Right_Side.jpg

Upper right.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/ASP_Finished_Right_Upper.jpg

Right rear.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/ASP_Finished_Right_Rear.jpg

Left side.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/ASP_Finished_Left_Side.jpg

Left side upper.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/ASP_Finished_Left_Upper.jpg

I have finished the graphics for the nameplate and gauges as well; now to size and get reproduced.

245172451824519

Now back to the documentation and CAD drawing. No more pictures for awhile.

Ken 1gramps1

KURTVD19
09-18-13, 12:06 PM
Ken:
Magnificent model. If the kit turns out half as good Model Expo has a winner. Thanks for sharing your work with us. It is truly inspiring to see such good work and it makes me put extra effort into my efforts after seeing your work.
Thanks,
Kurt

Giovanni
09-18-13, 01:41 PM
Ken,Great work!What will become of your model?Will it be reassembled after it is used to make molds and displayed?

xken
09-18-13, 02:09 PM
Kurt thank you for your kind words; now you need to post your work.

Giovanni, the caster keeps all the original masters to make additional molds as needed since the rubber molds breakdown over time and use.

Ken 1gramps1

Egon
09-18-13, 02:11 PM
What can I say, super, fantastic, beautiful 1clap1 What next ?

BrassBuilder
09-19-13, 01:53 AM
This makes me want to get back to my own project and get to documenting it....alas...I am in Afghanistan for a few more months....

Mike

GusSMHDV
09-19-13, 11:11 AM
Absolutely stunning work Ken. Congratulations on a superb build.1thumbup1

Cheers - Gus

xken
09-19-13, 11:17 AM
Mike, I don't think you are there on vacation; military or contract?

I am finalizing some build issues and logistics. Here is the result of using the Krylon Gold Foil Paint to simulate the brass components for the kit. This is the same paint used for the copper on the expansion tanks.

I took the spare large expansion tank and sanded it to accept paint them primed and painted with the Gold paint. Here it is compared to the brass seat cushion. No wet sanding or smoothing just prime and paint.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/Paint_test.jpg

Here I set the tank in place go get a feel of the finish in place with real brass.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/DSCN2367_edited-1.jpg

Here are the copper and gold side by side for comparison. They have a chrome as well that I will try and get for the stainless finish needed for the funnel.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/Paint_test_02.jpg

This works for me and will make the painting of parts much easier than I thought it would be when I started this build. Just thought I would share for those interested in metallic finishes.

Ken 1gramps1

VintageModMan
09-19-13, 05:03 PM
Thanks Ken thats great info on the Krylon metalic paints. I've done this type of thing with Duplicolor chrome paint and wet sanding.
It sure does make the difference and love the way you show the surface treat ment and texture using same paint.

Gary K

5thwheel
09-20-13, 10:45 AM
Well! I don't know about any one else but now that the project is done I am having withdrawal symptoms with out my daily fix of the steam pumper build progress.1clap1 Well done Kenneth.

xken
09-20-13, 12:30 PM
William, thank you and thank you to all others that have followed along so far. Once I get the CAD drawings done enough; I will tear the model down and do the final clean up and touch ups needed prior to sending all the masters off to the caster. While he is making the molds I will continue on the CAD drawings the best I can. One of these days I may even get good at it. 1confused1

Once I get parts back from the caster it starts all over again but I will be writing the assembly instructions, cleaning and painting parts etc. All that said there will be more postings down the road.

Thanks again to all! 1thumbup1

Ken

xken
09-20-13, 09:16 PM
It took awhile to figure out how to load this up but I finally sorted it out. Here is an in progress of my CAD file so far. At least I am stumbling through the process and learning as I go; but it is starting to look like the model now.

I am sure all you CAD experts will get a good chuckle out of this; but advice and tips are always helpful. The color lines are just my reference construction lines. I still have a great deal of drawing ahead yet. The actual drawing size is 24" x 36" D size. I had to export as a PDF; opened in Photoshop CS4, reduced the size to 11 x 15 and saved as a jpg.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/1869_Allerton_Sheet_2_9.jpg

Ken 1gramps1

spinellid82
09-20-13, 09:17 PM
Bravo!

BrassBuilder
09-20-13, 10:35 PM
Mike, I don't think you are there on vacation; military or contract?
Ken 1gramps1

Military. I'm here compliments of the US Army although when the Army isn't sending me off to exotic places, I work full time for the South Dakota National Guard as a computer tech. Here, I'm helping to manage a warehouse operation.

But on the good side....during downtime, I'm trying to spend some time on the CAD program that I use and attempting to get somewhat proficient in it.

The pumper looks great.

Mike

xken
09-21-13, 09:14 AM
Mike, back in 1967-68 the Marines offered me an all expenses paid 13 month tour to South Vietnam. I was in helicopter maintenance and ammo distribution. In other words a helicopter mechanic and machine gunner on CH-46's and UH- 34's. I enlisted in 1965 to get the G.I. Bill to pay for college. Coming down from Canada I nearly got trampled to death at the border by Americans heading north to avoid the draft.

I am teaching myself Corel CAD and it is a bit of a challenge hence my "stumbling" though it. I pretty much have the 2D some what understood and when I have nothing else to do I will entertain the learning of the 3D aspect of the program. At 66 who says old dogs cannot learn new tricks.

Keep your head down and stay safe my friend we want to see your projects when you get back. Thank you for your service! 1thumbup1

Ken 1gramps1

strevo
09-21-13, 11:04 AM
Looks like you're off to a good start on the CAD Ken.1thumbup1 I'm not sure how Corel works, but in Pro/E I usually just model the parts in 3D first, then create the drawings from that. The software lays out the drawing, and all I have to do is pick what views I want and add dimensions.

xken
09-21-13, 12:19 PM
Steve, I am familiar with Pro-E in fact back in my Rubbermaid days we worked with the developers to add plastic parts design stress analysis and mold flow. Many of the designers that worked for me were trained in it and it has a pretty steep learning curve. Being an executive I was not offered training in it at that time; I just got to authorize the checks for the designers. I usually took a designer about a year to get really good at using it.

I have not tried the 3D feature yet but I am sure there are some major features that are not included in a $600 package versus Pro-E.

However, one of these days I will have to sit down and plow through it, I see they now offer a manual so I will purchase one which I hope will help the 3D side.

Thanks for the heads up! 1thumbup1

Ken

BrassBuilder
09-22-13, 10:24 AM
Mike, back in 1967-68 the Marines offered me an all expenses paid 13 month tour to South Vietnam. I was in helicopter maintenance and ammo distribution. In other words a helicopter mechanic and machine gunner on CH-46's and UH- 34's. I enlisted in 1965 to get the G.I. Bill to pay for college. Coming down from Canada I nearly got trampled to death at the border by Americans heading north to avoid the draft.

I am teaching myself Corel CAD and it is a bit of a challenge hence my "stumbling" though it. I pretty much have the 2D some what understood and when I have nothing else to do I will entertain the learning of the 3D aspect of the program. At 66 who says old dogs cannot learn new tricks.

Keep your head down and stay safe my friend we want to see your projects when you get back. Thank you for your service! 1thumbup1

Ken 1gramps1


And thank you for your service too!

I'm using Bob-CAD for my parts because then I can output the file to G-Code for my CNC mill and lathe. It is not a regular CAD program like Corel or Turbo CAD. I have Turbo CAD and I'd like to try to get somewhat proficient in that too. I've messed around in Alibre, but just have not caught on to it. I'd really like to switch over to SolidWorks but the cost is too much for me right now.

Looking forward to your next projects.

Mike

gbritnell
09-22-13, 09:10 PM
Ken,
I don't know what to say that hasn't already been said. At some point all the superlatives get used up. I can only speak for myself but when I get finished with a project if it meets my standards then that's all that matters. Eadh of us in the business of building replicas has seen enough other work and knows where our work falls into the 'scale'. There's no denying that yours my friend is at the top of the scale. Thanks for the documentation. I know how much extra work it entails and thanks for taking us along on the journey.
gbritnell

xken
09-23-13, 08:37 AM
George,

Thank you for your kind words; and as to the "scale" your work is at the top as well. As builders we all wander down the road and we just take different forks in the road based upon our interests and skill sets. None are right or wrong; just different and it is the difference and diversity to be appreciated and learned from. Personally, I hope I never stop learning and I enjoy sharing what I have learned with others as a form of repayment for what I have learned from others over the years. Knowledge not shared is a real waste.

Have a great day and thanks again!

Ken 1gramps1

5thwheel
09-23-13, 10:53 AM
George,

Thank you for your kind words; and as to the "scale" your work is at the top as well. As builders we all wander down the road and we just take different forks in the road based upon our interests and skill sets. None are right or wrong; just different and it is the difference and diversity to be appreciated and learned from. Personally, I hope I never stop learning and I enjoy sharing what I have learned with others as a form of repayment for what I have learned from others over the years. Knowledge not shared is a real waste.

Have a great day and thanks again!

Ken 1gramps1



I agree with Ken....1clap1

spinellid82
09-27-13, 12:21 AM
Okay Ken, it is about time to get to the ladder wagon or hose cart...we're starting to twitch. he1hehe1hehe1he

xken
09-27-13, 07:34 AM
David, I have to finish up this project first before moving onto the next. Right now I am working on CAD drawings before dis assembling the model. Then I will drill a few needed holes for petcocks once apart; then send off the master parts to be cast. While waiting for the cast parts to come back I will clean up the CAD drawings needed for the plans.

Once I get the cast parts then it is build the final "proof of production" model while also writing the assembly instructions, taking pictures with the painted cast parts and necessary sub assembly drawings. Still plenty of work yet.

In the CAD drawing below, the various colors are different layers that I can turn on/off as needed. The drawing is 1/12th scale just as the model so I am working on "D size" 22" x 36". I am still learning CAD at the same time; I have ordered a Corel CAD instruction manual which I hope will help with the transition to 3D drawing. Nothing like a 66 year old fart teaching himself CAD. he1he

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/1869_Allerton_Sheet_3_9.jpg

Once all the above is done then onto the next which will be the ladder wagon.

Ken 1gramps1

strevo
09-27-13, 12:19 PM
Ken,
Will you be making the assembly instructions, or will they take care of that? Or does that happen after the first set of parts are cast?

Nevermind, just saw that in the above post. Lookin' good!1thumbup1

xken
10-07-13, 06:45 PM
The basic views of all the parts on various layers are finally done to the point where I can now start the dis-assembly process and final clean up of parts prior to sending off to the caster. I have had a few challenges in learning this CAD program bur am getting through it by trial and error. The manual came a I was disappointed with it since I had already "learned" most of what was in it and the tutorial focus is targeted at architectural drawing rather than part drawing. The solid modelling section looks a little thin and sparse at first glance. Maybe I will find some pearls of wisdom in there.

Here is the right side views page with all the parts in different colors on different layers. Next I will verify all the individual parts as I take them apart on the parts page so I have good reference to do the ISO views for the plans.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/1869_Allerton_Sheet_3_107.jpg

Ken 1gramps1

spinellid82
10-08-13, 11:05 AM
You could do it the way I did Ken, ITT Tech and about $18k. Then I ended up using it for a couple of years, left the scene and by the time I got back it was so different I considered going back to ITT.

I decided to do it the way you did, stumble, bumble and a bit of cursing.

Those drawings are a lot of work but they look great. Keep on keeping on.

Semper Fi brother!

xken
10-10-13, 12:17 PM
The prototype is now disassembled and all the parts cleaned ready for casting. But before I can send them off I have to do some additional parts drawings and photographing of parts. So it will be back to the CAD drawing.

Here is an overview of the parts laid out with no attempt to organize at this point.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/Master_Parts_01.jpg

Before I took it apart my wife wanted a picture of me holding it; so here is my modeling mug shot.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/Ken_Allerton_02.jpg

Ken 1gramps1

Don Garrett
10-10-13, 04:21 PM
I've been setting aside a portion of my hobby allowance for awhile now.........
I've got a feeling that this is going to be one of those "must have" kits when Model Expo releases them. 1clap11clap11clap1

keramh
10-10-13, 04:23 PM
hello Ken,

two beautiful pictures, the items, a good overview.
And that's great of you with the model.
Now you can see the size for the first time right!

What's that feeling when you actually completely disassembled a finished model again ...

Egon
10-10-13, 05:08 PM
Nice mug shot Ken gringrin have you calculate on your hourly salary 1bigmoney1 on that beautiful model 1thumbup1

Giovanni
10-10-13, 05:36 PM
Ken,How much does it weigh?Nice to see you finally holding this gorgeous model!

spinellid82
10-10-13, 10:52 PM
Absolutely gorgeous...the model you egotistical Jarhead! he1he I can't even begin to estimate what this kit will cost. Starting with the investment of your time and talent all the way through delivery into the hands of eager (and lucky) modelers. I might be able to buy a Pocher 50T Suprofile first.

chassisdude
10-11-13, 06:33 AM
Absolutely a work of art Ken..Fantastic model...

xken
10-11-13, 09:53 AM
Thank you all for your kinds words. No I have not weighed the model, but that would be a good thing to remember once I have the cast parts to build the proof of production model.

This will be a challenging model to manufacture with all the cast metal parts with related shrink rates and various materials. For sure an advanced level kit and not for the weak of wallet. The final model cost will come from Model Expo and I have no idea of what that will be at this point. Keep in mind that this will be the first time a horse drawn steam pumper has been kitted at this level of detail and scale.

My challenge moving forward will be the assembly instructions once I get the cast parts back. It is one thing to scratch build for yourself and another to describe to someone else how to build it from a box of parts.

As for the mug shot; I use to have more hair before starting to scratch build models. But I do love the challenge and problem solving; that keeps the brain cells moving.

Ken 1gramps1

5thwheel
10-11-13, 10:45 AM
Very beautiful model, Ken. I imagine the mold makers will not have any hair either. That will be one mold making challenge.I have not built a kit since the late 60s but this is one I would be tempted to try. I do not envy you in writing the assembly instructions but this should be a good and challenging kit. Bravo.

Bill (aka William)

KURTVD19
10-11-13, 08:44 PM
WOW! It's bigger than I thought even with looking at the drawings. Impressive and a true work of art.
Instructions have to be the hardest part because you know how you did it but have to constantly remember that the reader can't reaad your mind. I always find myself having to go back and insert stuff that I "assumed the reader knew because I sure did" but that's because I built it already and they haven't.
Thanks for sharing the completed model with you holding it and the disassembled model photo too.
Take care,
Kurt

spinellid82
10-20-13, 02:31 PM
Just stopped in for another looksee, nothing more fitting to say then, OORAH!

chassisdude
10-20-13, 03:42 PM
I saw your mug on the Model Expo site...Great promo...

xken
10-21-13, 01:53 PM
David, Glad to have you stop by; Michael yes they have been posting updates on their blog about the build.

Here is a sample of the Parts page I have been working one in CAD. I want to verify and document the individual parts before sending the parts off to be cast.

The photo etched files are sent off to be completed in brass (spark arrestor) and stainless(boiler walls and shield).

Now back to drawing.

Ken 1gramps1http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/Parts_Master_sheet.jpg

spinellid82
10-23-13, 01:54 AM
And now the fun begins...not. I would imagine that this is the hardest part of the formation of a kit.

xken
10-23-13, 04:10 PM
The Allerton parts are shipped to the caster as of 5 pm today. He should have them Friday morning. 151 parts and sub assemblies to be cast.; in total 5 lbs. of brass master parts. Now to start on plans and instructions while waiting for the cast parts, laser cut parts, photo etched parts and decals to arrive. Hopefully, in November it will be like an early Christmas.

Here they are in plastic bags the larger parts were wrapped in bubble wrap. In total the kit will have over 200 parts. The decals are in the works for the two gauges; and all the photo etched parts are approved for production.gringrin

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/parts_packed.jpg

Back to the CAD drawing and story booking for the instructions.
Ken 1gramps1

spinellid82
10-24-13, 08:53 AM
That is one serious pile of parts! It will surely be an exceptional kit.1thumbup1

xken
11-25-13, 10:45 AM
Just thought I would touch base. The parts are still at the caster and I have no ETA as of yet. In the meantime I have been working on all the necessary drawings for the plans and instructions. I am glad I have a background and education in industrial design so that I could do perspective drawing versus true Isometric drawing. I am sure I am using CAD not the way it was intended but exploded perspective drawings are more helpful in the long run. The green lines lead to vanishing points and what is great in CAD is that these lines can be adjusted to draw each individual part as needed. As you can see I am having fun with this drawing which is still a work in progress. Exploded views are always a challenge.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/Allerton_ISO_02.jpg

I am getting very comfortable at the 2D CAD drawing mode. Many more parts still need to be added to this drawing.

Ken 1gramps1

KURTVD19
11-25-13, 11:34 AM
Ken:
Fabulous drawing.
The first kit I came across with isometric views was the Chaperon by Model Shipways designed by Bob Crane. At first I thought that it was a big mistake until I sat and looked at it closely. This type of drawing is so much more helpful to the average modeler than the standard 3 view mechanical drawing to show the way something goes togeteher and how the parts relate to one another. Especially for the modeler w/o a background in drafting, engineering or a like field. Bob Crane has followed the use of isometrics in subsequent kits - Pickect Boat #1 and Philadelphia. When I have shown the kits and plans at model clubs the members have said how much they like the isometrics.
Your exploded drawing goes to the next step. Truly a very helpful tool for the modeler.
Someday I will find the time to try to finally learn CAD. To date every time I need a drawing the time isn't there so I resort to the drawing board that I have kept all these years.
Thanks for sharing your latest.
Kurt

xken
11-26-13, 10:53 AM
Kurt, Thanks for your comment which just reinforces my decision to do the perspective drawings. During my years of product development at Rubbermaid I had to interact with many non technical disciplines that were conceptually impaired and could not carry a creative thought even in a bucket. I learned that the most effective communication tool was the ability to draw in three dimensions impromptu during business meetings which saved endless hours and short cutted the development process. I still remember the most back handed compliment I received while sketching an idea for a mechanical mechanism to a bunch of engineers one of whom said " He draws like a CAD program."

I would encourage you learning CAD; I just wish I had learned it years ago. The only draw back is that it is designed for those who cannot draw offhand versus those that can and is very disciplined and math based. I am sure I break every rule there is in CAD drawing, but it works for me.

Besides, I am an old fart teaching myself so I have a very poor teacher. he1he

Ken 1gramps1

spinellid82
11-27-13, 10:29 PM
Looks darn good for a novice Ken! I sure couldn't do those drawings...not even close!

xken
12-05-13, 02:53 PM
Nearly finished with this perspective drawing of the exploded view with a couple of enlarged detail views. I am starting to feel real comfortable with the 2D aspects of this program. I am still waiting for cast parts to show up.


http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/Perspective_View_12.jpg
Ken 1gramps1

KURTVD19
12-09-13, 12:54 PM
Ken:
This is great. Thanks for sharing it.
Kurt

xken
12-10-13, 10:06 AM
Kurt, Thanks I think I am finally done with this perspective view. I has been a fun learning experience; especially teaching myself. Who says old dogs cannot learn new tricks! he1he

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/Perspective_View_12_10.jpeg

Ken 1gramps1

KURTVD19
12-11-13, 03:44 PM
Ken:
Looks great - could be framed for the shop wall.
I have been inspired to dust off the CAD program - installed it and will be practicing.
Thanks
Kurt

xken
12-11-13, 04:49 PM
Kurt,

That's great! What program are you using?

Ken gringrin

KURTVD19
12-12-13, 05:20 PM
Ken:
Turbo Cad Designer 2D.
I have received some great discount offers recently for the newest versions of Turbo Cad - the 3D and others but I figure I had better at least try this and then if needed I can upgrade once I know it will be worthwhile.
I am primarily a ship modeler and some time ago I purchased a program called ShipWright Software that enables one to scan a plan and then import it to this program and then do a full set of plans with lines, etc. Heard some real good things about it, bought it and haven't had the time to sit down with it either. I am just going to set aside some time and work on the basic Turbo Cad and then see if a basic bit of working knowledge will let me also work with this ShipWright stuff.
Time will tell.
Kurt

xken
01-30-14, 06:23 AM
While the site was down the cast parts came and I am starting to clean and paint them. Here are some quick pictures.

This shows some of the parts on the parts color reference drawing.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/DSCN2457_edited-1.jpg

Here is the upper half of the water box painted using the Gold Foil paint.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/Allerton_Upper_water_box.jpg

Here is a view of the lower water box with the front axle shaft sticking up. Note the cast threads that 1-72 nut threads onto. This foil paint is very effective for a metallic finish.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/Allerton_Lower_Water_box.jpg

Here is a top view looking down the boiler stack with the spark arrestor in place.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/Allerton_Painted_stack_01.jpg

Here is a side view of the stack showing the separate parts in their various finishes. The silver is the polished cast metal part. Copper and Gold Foil Krylon spray paint.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/Allerton_Painted_stack_03.jpg

Back to the parts pile. gringrin

Ken 1gramps1

KURTVD19
01-30-14, 12:27 PM
Ken:
Fantastic finish on the parts. Did they require a lot of polishing clean up or just the usual cleaning to get oils, etc. off the pieces?
Did you spray these parts with the Krylon rattle can or did you decant them and use an airbrush? If the finish came right out of a rattle can it is great stuff.
Kurt

xken
01-30-14, 12:41 PM
Kurt,

There was the usual filing and sanding to match the parting lines which is kind of normal for metal castings using this process of vulcanized rubber molds. the parts really incredible considering some of the tiny details involved.

Paint is right out of the rattle cans no airbrushing. These foil paints are great for metallic finishes as needed for this model and a cost effective alternative to plating. Will be posting more as I go.

Ken 1gramps1

ScaleMotorcars
01-30-14, 01:51 PM
Great detail on the paint, especially the brass. gringrin

xken
01-31-14, 07:44 AM
More parts cleaned and painted. Here they are being staged on the color reference drawing.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/Allerton_Expansion_tank_and_lamp.jpg

Here is the front axle assembly the hitch pin was used to align the the holes to glue the brace in place. The axle shafts where the wheels attach is unpainted.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/Allerton_Front_axle_assembly.jpg

This is the steam cylinder and note the casting detail on the petcock which is a separate cast part.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/Allerton_Steam_Cylinder_Box_bottom_view.jpg

This is the start of valve assembly.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/Allerton_Steam_Valve_unit.jpg

This shows the finished water box. All that is needed for this unit is the gauge decal.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/Allerton_Upper_Water_Box_right_view.jpg

Time and patience is what is needed for this build....clean parts....prime parts...paint parts...wait for paint to dry while cleaning more parts. I will be at this for a while given the number of parts. Some of these pictures will be used for the assembly instructions as well.

Ken 1gramps1

keramh
01-31-14, 02:47 PM
The surfaces of the parts look so wonderfully beautiful.
Each of these items is an eye catcher and should be kept under a glass dome.

xken
01-31-14, 03:37 PM
Keramh, thanks. I just fitted these together while waiting for primer to dry. Just could not resist seeing how they would look.

Here is a side view of the seat assembly press fit onto the water box.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/Allerton_seat_Side_View.jpg

Then I got up the nerve to stack the expansion tank with the lamp on top of the water box.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/Allerton_Expansion_tank_and_lamp_01.jpg

Here is a closeup of the lamp.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/Allerton_Expansion_tank_and_lamp_Closeup.jpg

Now back to work.

xken
02-03-14, 10:29 AM
Just cleaning up more parts and painting as needed the appropriate color.
Here is the crankshaft in place; some of these pictures will be used in the assembly instructions that I have to write for the kit.
In this case the crankshaft can be put in place backwards; the challenge in writing instructions is to make them idiot proof. 1confused1

Here also you can see the smallest cast parts; the acorn nuts that index into the front wall of the steam cylinder box.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/Allerton_Crankshaft_orientation_06.jpg

Here is the support arm for the crankshaft and another part that can be assembled backwards. The vertical arm link with the bolts goes to the rear.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/Allerton_Crankshaft_Support_bracket.jpg

Here is the rear shock absorber assembly painted and ready to go; also a couple more tint cast parts the brass balls on top. Also note that the wheel shafts are not painted.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/Allerton_Left_Shock_absorber.jpg

Now back to more parts.

keramh
02-03-14, 02:28 PM
Hi Ken,

I know nicth if you mentioned it or if I've read it.
What a gold paint you use, the color and the gloss of polished brass come very close.

xken
02-03-14, 04:14 PM
Her is a link to the paint for the Gold, Copper and Silver

Premium Metallic - | Krylon (http://www.krylon.com/products/premium-metallic/)

This is about as close to a plated finish that you will find in a spray can.

chassisdude
02-03-14, 07:40 PM
Her is a link to the paint for the Gold, Copper and Silver

Premium Metallic - | Krylon (http://www.krylon.com/products/premium-metallic/)

This is about as close to a plated finish that you will find in a spray can.

It is a good quality paint..The sheen is outstanding when used on metals..The effects are not as dramatic on plastics...At least in my experience...Excellent paint non the less...

xken
02-03-14, 07:52 PM
Chassidude, the one thing I have observed is that it has a much more dramatic finish when painted over white primer rather than gray primer or another color. Kind of like the same effect that a candy paint has over it's base color. The one thing I am recommending in the instructions is the use of white primer.

chassisdude
02-03-14, 08:07 PM
Chassidude, the one thing I have observed is that it has a much more dramatic finish when painted over white primer rather than gray primer or another color. Kind of like the same effect that a candy paint has over it's base color. The one thing I am recommending in the instructions is the use of white primer.

Ive actually just stated using white primer.. better color ..Havent tried it with the metalics yet..makes sense though..Thanks...

xken
02-04-14, 08:00 AM
Here is the front half with some parts just set in place for now. Next I will work on the brake linkage and support arms.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/Allerton_Front_Left_Half_04.jpg

Here is a close up showing the lamp and expansion tank copper finish.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/Allerton_Front_Left_Half_closeup.jpg

Here is another close up, the key to working with these Foil paints is to use white primer on a smooth finish. The smoother the finish the better the results. With this model many of the parts were cast so a super smooth surface is not really needed.
This spray can paint is the best I have found that comes the closest to realistic metallic finishes.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/Allerton_Front_Left_Half_closeup_01.jpg

Back to cleaning parts.

keramh
02-05-14, 06:19 AM
white primer, that's interesting, I have so far, had the best experience with gloss black as a primer.

xken
02-05-14, 08:11 AM
Keramh, I believe that is true when using metalizer type paints; however this Krylon Foil Paint is just regular spray can paint, no buffing or polishing and clear coating. The only challenge is letting it set over night before handling; otherwise you run the chance of finger prints in the surface. It is slow drying which allows the plate like finish.

xken
02-05-14, 04:45 PM
The caster has done a fantastic job on all the parts.Where the rubber really hits the road is the detail maintained on the small parts. Here is a picture of a random sampling ready to be primed. What is truly impressive is the 00-90 threads on some of the linkage rods that a nut can be threaded onto. You have had to try casting small parts to really appreciate the quality of these in white metal.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/Allerton_small_cast_parts.jpg

Jo NZ
02-06-14, 12:31 AM
[QUOTE=xken;143460]
In this case the crankshaft can be put in place backwards; the challenge in writing instructions is to make them idiot proof./QUOTE]

Ken, making instructions idiot proof is the hardest thing in the world. Whatever you write, the world will always find a better idiot. I have bitter experience from writing military manuals!

Just do your best and hope for a tiny amount of common sense...1confused1

xken
02-06-14, 12:45 PM
Jo Nz,

You are absolutely correct; every time I think I have seen a new level of stupidity established someone always steps up to better it. I all I can do is my best and hope I am successful. Thank goodness most parts will only fit one way.

Thanks for you encouragement!

xken
02-07-14, 10:55 AM
Well all parts are now filed, sanded, primed and painted. Here are a few pictures. I am now waiting for the Photo etched boiler walls to show up before I can build any further since most of the balance of the parts will connect with them once they are glued in place.

Here is a bottom view of the drive mechanism. With out the front axle in place.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/Allerton_Drive_Mechanism_Bottom_View.jpg

I mentioned above about the quality of the castings, here is a picture showing the 0-80 threaded rod on the boiler brace.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/Allerton_Boiler_Brace_Chain_connection.jpg

Here is the brake linkage over view. Also note the threads on the link rod.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/Allerton_Brake_linkage_01.jpg

This shows the brake pedal rod and how it indexes into the pivot point in the lower water box.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/Allerton_Brake_Pedal_Link_Arm.jpg

Here is the rear axle with the two shock absorbers and linkage that indexes into the boiler walls.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/Allerton_Rear_Axle_02.jpg

Now to work on some preliminary assembly instructions until more parts show up.

KURTVD19
02-10-14, 11:32 AM
Ken:
Wow, the quality of the cast parts is outstanding. Being able to thread a 0-90 nut onto cast threads is amazing.

On a bit different subject - I reviewed your book for the Spring 2014 issue of the Nautical Research Journal - it is currently at the printer. If you can respond to me privately with your mailing address I will have a copy sent as soon as it's printed. My email is kurt at modelshipyard dot com (hope that confuses the robots - and maybe the NSA).

Take care,
Kurt

xken
02-11-14, 08:32 AM
Kurt,

Thanks! Did you get my PM with my address?

Ken

KURTVD19
02-11-14, 11:25 AM
Ken:
Yes I did. The Journal is at the printer now and will ship by the end of the month. When you get the Journal let me know what you think of it. I know you will like the book review, but I would be interested in what you think of the Journal as a modeler who appreciates doing things right. It's a step above the usual model magazine IMHO.
Take care,
Kurt

Auréance
02-22-14, 02:31 PM
To xKen:
Can we say that a model is too much? I think so.
Congratulations, you have talents watchmaker, boilermaker, mechanic and artist. Bravo.

xken
03-08-14, 02:14 PM
Photo etched Stainless Steel parts finally came and they are perfect.
Here is an image of the nameplate shield that will go on the back of the upper boiler wall. Paint filled with satin black paint and then sanded to show the text.
http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/Allerton_Shield_02.jpg

Here are some pictures of the Stainless Steel boiler walls and painted cast parts.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/Overall_01.jpg

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/Overall_02.jpg

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/Overall_03.jpg
http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/Overall_04.jpg

I am still plugging away at the assembly instruction and am about 2/3's complete. But now with the boiler walls I can finish up all the little detailing.

KURTVD19
03-10-14, 11:45 AM
Ken:
Fantastic! Looking great. The nameplate is just beautiful. Seeing it coming together is making me drool over the future kit's release.
You mentioned that the SS pieces arrived and that the boiler was SS. Is it a photo etch wrap or plating?
Take care,
Kurt

xken
03-10-14, 01:25 PM
Kurt,
Thanks! The upper and lower boiler walls are Photo etched .010" Stainless Steel sheets with the rivet pattern half etched and all the hole locations etched completely. I then scrubbed the sheets horizontally with a Scotchbrite pad for the brushed finish.

Tage
03-10-14, 08:43 PM
Love the photo etched plate!
How many were in the production run? Might be fun to do some Rolls Royce photo etched parts on the steering column.
Did you do multiples to reduce the cost? Who did the etching?
Beautiful work.

xken
03-10-14, 09:10 PM
Tage,

I just them files and they do the layout and Model Expo sends me the parts. I know that 500 nameplates were done on one sheet. I have no idea of the cost. I work with Ida Connolly; the business info is below.

PHOTOFABRICATION ENGINEERING
500 FORTUNE DR PH 508-478-2025
Milford, MA 01757 Fax 508-478-3582

xken
03-11-14, 10:07 AM
Working away adding more of the components and writing the assembly instructions as I go.

Here is the pictures of where I am at as of today. Getting closer......
http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/Overall_06_Left_side.jpg

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/Overall_07_Right_side.jpg

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/Overall_08_Right_side_works.jpg

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/Overall_09_Rear_view.jpg
I am not sure which is more difficult; building the model or writing the assembly instructions.

KURTVD19
03-12-14, 12:07 PM
Ken:
I have just as much satisfaction from my writing as the building recently. I used to work daily with a guy who built at a much faster pace then me and I sometimes think that if he was still around I would photograph his work and write articles about the process rather than building. Without Bill here though I do both and enjoy both aspects about equally.

When writing instructions I always used the "Grandmother Rule". I wrote so my Grandmother could understand it and if she could understand it, being a sharp old gal but not a modeler in any manner, then I figured any modelers should be able to understand the writing. I found way too many times with my stuff as well as others that too much is assumed on the part of the writer. We built it once, from scratch, so we know all the little steps that aren't even thought about much but might have been the single point that was omitted that would have made the writing clear to the kit builder.

Sometimes when building a kit, no, actually every time, I wish that kit manufacturers would have an independent builder build each model from the prototype parts before the instructions were finalized and printed and it was too late to make changes. Most times the parts are just fine - with a few exceptions - but the instructions left out information or the steps were out of order. I have had the opportunity to be the first to build several kits and have found all of the above as well as one kit with a significant part that was laser cut at 1/2 the length needed. There was space on the wood fret for the correct length - called the designer's attention to this, the correction was made and only about 6 kits waiting to be packaged had to have parts replaced. Saved some poor buyer getting his hands on the kit with the short piece trying to figure out what he had done wrong, having to call the manufacturer, and probably being mad at them about the whole situation.
Take care,
Kurt

xken
03-14-14, 10:38 AM
Kurt,
My standard is a 10 year old with plans and photographs. More can be said in a picture than text. I also get all the preproduction parts and build a "Proof of Production" model pictured below using actual parts from suppliers and write the instructions and take photos as I build. This way I know all the parts are correct and fit the way they are supposed to and Model Expo will delivery a quality kit.

Here is the preproduction "Proof of Production" model pictures all using production parts to this point. I am still waiting for the decals to come for the two gauges and that is why the Boiler Pressure gauge is missing in this pictures, and that the water pressure gauge has no instrument face. That is also why the Hose Retaining Belts are not glued in place; the hoses on the right side will be removed to install the boiler gauge.

I like how the Krylon Foil paints replicate the plated finishes.



http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/Allerton_Final_Right_side.jpg

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/Allerton_Final_Right_works_Close.jpg

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/922/Allerton_Final_Upper_Front_Right.jpg

Now to finish up the plans, assembly instructions and materials list. I will add the pressure gauge to the instructions once received.

Josef
04-19-14, 04:32 PM
Beautiful job! I like your attention to detail.

xken
05-07-14, 10:10 AM
The decals finally arrived and were applied to the gauges. Here is an overall view of them in place before adding the hoses to the right side.


http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/941/ASP_Gauges_Final.jpg

Here is a view with the hoses in place. An the model is now complete. 1yeah1

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/941/ASP_Gauges_Final_Hose.jpg

Here is a close up of the Water Box pressure gauge. This is 3/16" in diameter.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/941/ASP_Gauges_Final_Water_box.jpg

Here is a close up of the Boiler pressure gauge, and it is 5/15" in diameter.

http://www.scalemotorcars.com/gallery/data/941/ASP_Gauges_Final_Boiler.jpg

Everything is now in the hands of Model Expo Inc. and watch for the kit later this summer. Buy it and have as much fun building it as I did. gringrin

Ton
05-07-14, 12:56 PM
Amazing! ...and a joy to look

KURTVD19
05-10-14, 11:44 AM
Ken:
The pieces from the "Kit" look as good as your masters. This will be a great kit. Job well done.
Kurt

xken
05-10-14, 05:39 PM
Kurt,

The cast parts are very good. They even pick up the threads on 00-90 and 0-80 to the point of screwing nuts on them.
Of course some of the larger slender pieces need straightening out form transport; but then again the parts I got were not in a kit box.
Some flash and parting line need to be cleaned which is normal for this kind of casting.

Ken

spinellid82
05-13-14, 01:06 PM
Absolutely beautiful Ken!

marcos1201
06-02-14, 11:00 PM
question for KEN


JUST CANT STOP LOOKING THIS BEAUTY

I AM THINKING IT IS A GREAT OPORUNITY FOR MANY OF US TO GET INTO SCRATCH BUILDING SINCE WE
HAVE THE CHANCE TO BUY THE KIT AND THEN SUBSTITUTE SOME PICES BY SCRATCH BUILDING THEM
WITH THE HELP OF THIS UNVALUABLE GIDE SO WE HAVE A MASTER FROM THE KIT IF FOR ANY REASON WE FAIL REPRODUCING ANY PICE WE JUST USE THE ONE PRVIDED THERE WITHOUT THE FRUSTRATION OF FAILING WITH THE
GREAT PROJET

WHAT DO YOU THINK?gringrin

xken
06-16-14, 09:28 PM
marcos1201, That would be a great way to get started by using the kit parts as patterns. Of course you will need at least a tabletop lathe for many of the parts. This concept would be learning by replicating which is often used in certain trade schools. The real skill to be learned is problem solving by having to figuire out how to make the part.

Ken

marcos1201
07-10-14, 01:03 PM
just cant wait to buy it any idea when is goeing to be available?

xken
07-10-14, 02:33 PM
Marcos, no I have no idea of when it will be ready; but I am sure Model Expo will have it as soon as they can.

Ken

xken
10-04-14, 12:32 PM
Here at last. This is the sell sheet from their site. It is being introduced at 40% off online only and must use sale code at $419.00.

http://www.modelexpo-online.com/product.asp?ITEMNO=MS6006

xken
10-04-14, 12:36 PM
Here at last. It is being introduced with postcard mailer at 40% at $419.00

http://www.modelexpo-online.com/product.asp?ITEMNO=MS6006

KURTVD19
11-14-14, 07:47 PM
Ken:
I have the kit in hand. Clean up is going well and applied some paint already to the main chassis and rear coal bin/boiler ring piece. It's as good as we all thought it would be. I see it's scheduled for regular distribution later this month (though they are often late with meeting self-announced release dates). Weighed the box before opening it and it was 6.5 pounds - except for the wheels and rear step (of boxwood) and the hose (shoelace) it is all metal. Quality castings and the deformation of the small pieces was minor and easily corrected - such as the seat braces.
Good job.
Kurt

xken
11-16-14, 10:07 AM
Kurt, glad to hear all is well with the kit. The real credit goes to Model Expo for its production, I am just the designer and the execution is out of my hands. They say this is the most complicated kit they have ever produced and hopefully it will be a success for them.

KURTVD19
12-11-14, 08:59 PM
I have the kit in hand and I am very impressed with the whole thing. First thing to notice is the weight of the box - over 6 pounds!
27406

The entire kit is cast metal with the exception of the laser cut wheel rims and spokes, and the rear step - from basswood. Two shoelaces for the hoses and the string that wraps the playpipe hose nozzles - just like the real things were wrapped with.
There is the usual clean up of cast parts to take care of but for the number of parts and the complexity of this kit the cleanup is actually much less than normal.
Some of the parts that I have cleaned up and painted are below;
2740727408

The foil paints Ken recommends are absolutely amazing. I am an airbrush purist but these actually go on great and the bother of decanting the spray to use in the airbrush just isn't worth it in this case.

The only problem I have encountered is in bending the Stainless Steel boiler shells. They are photo etched Stainless Steel and while I got the lower shell done by hand it was a real chore and I was unable to do the top one by hand and had to resort to my little sheet metal roller. Ken tells me that the production kits will have a thinner SS shell material as he too was unable to form the kit pieces and the manufacturer has made a change. The shells - top piece on the left - are ready for assembly onto the model. The roller I used is also shown.
27409
27410

I will post photos of the kit build as I go along.

Kurt

xken
12-11-14, 11:15 PM
Kurt,
Great to see the pictures and the box. I never get to see the finished product packed out. Yes the Foil paints are the best I have found so far to replicate a plated finish. One tip to try is to warm the paint can with hot water and shake until you cannot tell the temprature change. This creates a little more pressure in the can and atomizes the paint as well.

Keep posting when you can it will be interesting to watch thia build.

KURTVD19
12-12-14, 04:19 PM
Here is a photo of the left Slide Guide Assembly. Those are 00.90 nuts (the brass ones) on the threaded cast pieces - as cast - no touch up or anything. Amazing castings.
Kurt
27419

xken
12-14-14, 11:57 AM
Kurt, yes the castings are really excellent and I hope that they can maintain the level of quality through out the production cycle. Just do not over tighten the nuts or you will strip them.
Have a great day!

KURTVD19
12-25-14, 01:53 PM
Almost all of the kit pieces are now painted and the assembly will commence. Already have the main chassis with the crankshaft, flywheels and associated pieces assembled. Have been holding off on doing the wheels as I am not a great carver and getting 48 spokes to all be carved to the same profile is daunting. I might just do one of each size up really nice and then cast them.

xken
12-26-14, 12:36 PM
Kurt,
Cutting them is fairly easy; the real key is using a really sharp Xacto Blade and carving them once assembled into the hub and rim. Prime them to use the primer as a refernce guide. Start on the inside to get use to the cutting process. Blend with needle file. Work slow and pay attention to the wood grain orientation and use a slicing action with the Xacto blade. Consider building one of each and then cast the entire wheels, save the molds for future wheel builds.

KURTVD19
01-03-15, 11:48 AM
Here are a couple of progress shots. Had to put it aside to work on another model (wooden boat) but will get back to it ASAP.

27500
The assembly from the right side
27501
The top view

The next step is to attach the boiler shell pieces. They are made up and almost every part is painted with just a few of the last items to go on needing paint. The wheel assembly is the only actual fabrication needed and I will start them very soon.
Kurt

Egon
01-03-15, 07:36 PM
Ken I can't see your name on the kitbox, is it on the back ?

xken
01-03-15, 08:36 PM
Egon, you need to borrow my glasseshe1he there is a tag line under the rear wheel that I did it. White type on the black background.

KURTVD19
01-04-15, 11:32 AM
Credit is also shown on the front of the instruction manual

Egon
01-04-15, 06:54 PM
Got it 1thumbup1

marcos1201
04-13-15, 07:24 PM
hi

just to let you all know the kit is now available

josebrito
07-28-15, 02:52 PM
Hey Kurt. great job to follow with great interest. I'll see José progress.

Script
12-18-15, 03:42 PM
Ken or Kurt,

I am just in the process of finishing the Allerton Steam Pumper and I was told by Model-Expo to contact you, Ken, about a couple issues. They gave me your phone number but I elected not to call and interrupt your holidays...not to mention it seems kind of wrong since i bought the kit from them. I wont bore you with my issues except to inquire as to where or what you used for the hoses. The shoelace that came in my kit was just a simple woven lace, no tubular area to open up. I never shop shoelaces anymore so i wonder if you used something else....it looks kind of like a woven cable shield or something?
The instructions I received did not match some of the parts or castings. That is no great issue but it did result in my having to do some major drilling that tested my equipment1dknow1.i
There were no bolts included in the parts list that were long enough for the brake u-joint connection. When I inquired, they said that since it wasn't on the parts list and no on else brought it up, I should call you........I bought the right bolts at the local hobby store....

Anyway, a great kit representing a unique period....and my wife loves it! More than I can say about my 'sticks and string' wood ship models!

And I guess I did bore you with some of my other issues....sorry...

Merry Christmas!

Thanks,

Jim

xken
01-02-16, 11:11 AM
Jim, Sorry to hear about the issues you had. I as the kit designer can only recommend certain sourced material like the laces and what is supplied with the kit is beyond my control. What I used for the "proof of build" was a tubular athletic shoe lace. The bolt issue was identified and addressed and they should have been 3/8" long not the 1/4" supplied. I do not get to see the final package that Model Expo sells to the public only cast and laser cut parts supplied for the "proof of build" so I do not know of the differences between the parts and instructions. I was able to build with no issues on the parts I received; however the one major change before production was to change the stainless steel boiler sheets from .010" to .005" for easier forming. Even they admit that this is the most complicated kit they have ever done. The follow on kit is the ladder wagon that they have everything to take to production when they decide to do it.

I am glad to hear that your wife enjoys it. 1yeah1

Script
01-04-16, 07:19 AM
Jim, Sorry to hear about the issues you had. I as the kit designer can only recommend certain sourced material like the laces and what is supplied with the kit is beyond my control. What I used for the "proof of build" was a tubular athletic shoe lace. The bolt issue was identified and addressed and they should have been 3/8" long not the 1/4" supplied. I do not get to see the final package that Model Expo sells to the public only cast and laser cut parts supplied for the "proof of build" so I do not know of the differences between the parts and instructions. I was able to build with no issues on the parts I received; however the one major change before production was to change the stainless steel boiler sheets from .010" to .005" for easier forming. Even they admit that this is the most complicated kit they have ever done. The follow on kit is the ladder wagon that they have everything to take to production when they decide to do it.

I am glad to hear that your wife enjoys it. 1yeah1

Thanks for following up! To further update......Model-expo did contact me and we discussed my issues with the kit. They were willing to send me replacement parts based on what I had communicated but by then I had already finished the kit with my own adaptations. I did have a very early release kit so some things had already been changed and they are going to change a few other things like the too small chain provided and the hose material, I guess. Model-expo is a good outfit and I am glad they responded as they always have. It may be that with their move and the Holidays things were a bit hectic.
On anther note, one of my MSW friends was very complimentary of your willingness to help via phone call or whatever....perhaps on my next build of one of your designs!

Cheers!

Jim

Gentlegiant
08-15-17, 09:46 AM
I use Krylon metal paint in spray for brass and copper , but for the very little part can i use spray paint on a small brush ? for obtain the same color or i really did to paint very all parts with spray?